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  • So next week I'll be running a semi regular game of Dungeon Crawl Classics for some of my co-workers. A one shot funnel got enough buzz to keep it going.

    I'm pretty excited to dive back into some low level fantasy gaming. Got my hex map made, I've created several points of interest for them. Are there any cool dungeon, temple, or adventures you guys have done that you'd be willing to share?

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    • Originally posted by geeklord1 View Post
      So next week I'll be running a semi regular game of Dungeon Crawl Classics for some of my co-workers. A one shot funnel got enough buzz to keep it going.

      I'm pretty excited to dive back into some low level fantasy gaming. Got my hex map made, I've created several points of interest for them. Are there any cool dungeon, temple, or adventures you guys have done that you'd be willing to share?
      I've personally only run one adventure thus far, Matt Colville's Delian Tomb. It's a linear dungeon full of goblins, a bugbear, one trap, and one puzzle that leads to some treasure and optional skeletons. Might not be a hugely exciting place, but you could have the players go there for any number of reasons - rescue the blacksmith's daughter, uncover ancient artifact, clear out a place on order from the local baron, etc. - and that just assumes the tomb itself isn't just a generic "place of interest" that the party could find and be curious about.

      While we're on the subject of Matt Colville, I'll echo his recommendation of an AD&D 1 adventure module, N1 - Against the Cult of the Reptile God. Has a fair amount of intrigue - the party enters a down suffering from some kind of misfortune that the residents don't understand - and has a couple dungeons in it (tunnels beneath a tavern, a temple, and the swampy cave of the eponymous Reptile God). All surrounding a Cult of a Reptile God, and also the Reptile God.

      I've also been reading a lot of old issues of DUNGEON Magazine, that could be of use if you can find the pdfs. I'd recommend "Assault on Eddiestone Point" and "Guardians of the Tomb" (Issue #1), "The Titan's Dream" (Issue #2), "Kingdom in the Swamp" (Issue #4), and "The Shrine of Ilsidahur" and "The Artisan's Tomb" (Issue #10). You'll obviously need some mechanical and narrative reworkings, but many of these could be plopped down around the landscape. Or you could just pillage the adventures for maps and encounter ideas, and completely jettison the plots.


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      • [QUOTE=Bluecho;n1264343]
        While we're on the subject of Matt Colville, I'll echo his recommendation of an AD&D 1 adventure module, N1 - Against the Cult of the Reptile God. Has a fair amount of intrigue - the party enters a down suffering from some kind of misfortune that the residents don't understand - and has a couple dungeons in it (tunnels beneath a tavern, a temple, and the swampy cave of the eponymous Reptile God). All surrounding a Cult of a Reptile God, and also the Reptile God.



        Love this adventure. It'll take some real tweaking for DCC since I'll have to invent a Naga since DCC doesn't have them by default.

        Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
        I've also been reading a lot of old issues of DUNGEON Magazine, that could be of use if you can find the pdfs. I'd recommend "Assault on Eddiestone Point" and "Guardians of the Tomb" (Issue #1), "The Titan's Dream" (Issue #2), "Kingdom in the Swamp" (Issue #4), and "The Shrine of Ilsidahur" and "The Artisan's Tomb" (Issue #10). You'll obviously need some mechanical and narrative reworkings, but many of these could be plopped down around the landscape. Or you could just pillage the adventures for maps and encounter ideas, and completely jettison the plots.
        Where did you grab those Dungeon Magazines? I've heard nothing but good things.

        Currently I've taken some DCC adventures and just dropped them in. In addition I stole an adventure idea from Kull with the temple of silence (added a nice shitty pun too!).

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        • Originally posted by geeklord1 View Post
          Love this adventure. It'll take some real tweaking for DCC since I'll have to invent a Naga since DCC doesn't have them by default.
          Indeed. Were it 5e, I'd suggest adapting the Bone Naga stats from the DMG (the Spirit Naga stat block is a bit much for the intended 1-3 level range the adventure is intended for), with a modified spell list.

          Whatever you end up doing, I would advise against requiring the party to have a Globe of Invulnerability (or the edition equivalent) just to survive the encounter. Seems kind of mean, if you ask me. Explictica Defilus should be hard enough on her own, without being able to wipe the lower level party in a single hit. Plus, there's no telling if you'll even use Ramne, or that the party will manage to get his old ass all the way to her lair.


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          • What happens if a Fiend Pact Warlock who made a deal with a Devil later decides to multiclass into becoming a Cleric for a Demon Lord?

            Who ends up getting their soul?

            Somehow, I don't see a Demon Lord as the kind of person who gives a flying crap about the legal ramifications of breaking an iron clad contract, especially one that's associated with their ancient rivals!
            Last edited by Nyrufa; 11-09-2018, 03:58 PM.

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            • Shouldn't it be that the 2nd invited owner won't take on already a legally owned soul, or if it does, the battle starts pretty quick, certainly the moment a spell or ability is used and a different beings power is channeled through the vessel

              And another thing, why would a new patron let someone channel any of their energy if their ownership is in question?

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              • Originally posted by Willowfang View Post
                Shouldn't it be that the 2nd invited owner won't take on already a legally owned soul, or if it does, the battle starts pretty quick, certainly the moment a spell or ability is used and a different beings power is channeled through the vessel

                And another thing, why would a new patron let someone channel any of their energy if their ownership is in question?

                As I said, the second patron is a Demon.

                A creature devoted to chaos, anarchy and utter selfishness.

                A creature who has been feuding with Devils since the dawn of time.

                I don't think they care if a Devil has a legal contract, because Demons have no regard for the law in the first place.

                If anything, the Demon would probably find the affair entertaining, as it provides an excuse to stir up some chaos!

                As for the Devil, I believe their authority to revoke the Warlock's powers would depend upon the nature of the contract. Evil or not, they are still creatures of Order, who are bound by their word. So long as the Warlock isn't doing anything explicitly forbidden within their contract, they can't retaliate against them for it.
                Last edited by Nyrufa; 11-10-2018, 08:37 AM.

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                • Right, the the upper, or lower players were all lawful, maybe, but a being of Chaos wouldn't worry too much maybe about other contracts unless they were much weaker, or if they though the contract might not be honored since the person made one with evil

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                  • Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
                    What happens if a Fiend Pact Warlock who made a deal with a Devil later decides to multiclass into becoming a Cleric for a Demon Lord?

                    Who ends up getting their soul?
                    There are lots of variables. First, I don't see anything under the Fiend Pact that requires you to sell your soul to the power you made a deal with. You make a deal which seems to be based on pretty much anything, of which selling your soul is one possibility. So in that case the Warlock's soul would be his own and he could later end up choosing to follow a Demon Lord (who would end up getting his soul).

                    If a Warlock did sell his soul to a Devil, then it's possible that no Demon Lord (or anyone else) would bother with the Warlock because they just plain couldn't get his soul. On the other hand, maybe the Demon Lord doesn't care about what happens after the Warlock dies, but is very interested in providing the Warlock power right now, and so allows the Warlock to become a cleric and then cedes the soul to the Devil on the Warlock's death.

                    It would also depend on the particular Devil and Demon Lord. For example, there might be a big difference in how important Juiblex and Orcus view the souls of worshipers and Juiblex might not care or even notice if the soul of a worshiper ends up going to a devil instead, whereas for Orcus that might be really important. Or in the Pathfinder universe, if you had a Warlock who sold his soul to Asmodeus, the Demon Lord Baphomet (who has a deep, abiding hatred for Asmodeus) might be willing to make all kinds of deals or take on all kinds of extra burdens in order to get the soul of someone who had sold himself to his archrival.

                    Finally, in most D&D settings there's a fair amount of soul commerce that goes on in the lower planes, with powerful demons, devils, night hags, etc bartering souls like currency. Even a demon lord and archdevil who utterly detest one another might engage in some low level soul exchanges and might be willing to come up with some kind of an economic solution to the soul in question.

                    I guess it would depend on what kind of game you're running and what kind of mood, tone and theme you were going for.

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                    • I don’t see Demons engaging in Warlock patronage by way of contracts. That’s a Devil thing. No self-respecting Demon would (willingly) allow themselves to be bound by the terms of contract, and no would-be Warlock with half a brain would trust a Demon to honor the terms of a contract. Either the warlock needs to use some extremely powerful binding magic to force the Demon to hold up its end of the bargain against its own will (which would be some extremely risky business), or the Demon needs to offer its patronage through other means, like a curse. Basically, I don’t see Demonic warlock pacts happening with mutual consent. One way or the other, someone is being forced into the arrangement.

                      EDIT: Oh, wait, you were talking about Demonic Clerics, not Warlocks. I don’t think Clerics owe their souls to their deities. I mean, granted, your alignment determines the fate of your soul after death and deities generally require their Clerics to be of the appropriate alignment. But I’m pretty sure a Warlock pact where the soul was the price would supersede alignment-based soul destinations. As Anubis observed, this would likely mean that a Demon wouldn’t be particularly interested in a prospective Cleric whose soul was already owed to a Devil, unless they wanted the Cleric’s service for reasons other than their soul.
                      Last edited by Charlaquin; 11-10-2018, 03:28 PM.


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                      • So during the last session with my players, I had a fun experience where I had to improvise an whole dungeon as one of my players got herself into a tight spot by barging into the local mayor's house and rolled an natural 20 on investigation (I didn't had plans for the house, and she was about the get captured and did got natural 20 so I said "why not?"). I was interesting, and I mostly used the experience in order to lay the foundations for their next adventure- but it also reminded me that I should always be prepared for my players doing the craziest things (seriously, anything less than natural 20 and she would have been captured. It was almost worst, for she got almost killed by the randomized traps, and as she was all alone she had no one to heal her- which would mean her dying all alone under the city due to her own sidequest).

                        As for who gets the soul of the Warlock/Cleric, I think it would greatly depend on the campaign in question. If in your setting worshiping a deity decides who takes the soul, it would be a different case than a setting where alignment decided your afterlife. Basically, I would say that in occult pact which directly takes your soul precedes any other conventional "afterlife method" (unless you make a number of pacts in the same time, of course, or get your soul eaten/stolen/undead/stuck in a jar/etc). It is basically all in the DM's territory, and would change with the nature and cosmology of the setting you use for the game.


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                        • Idea for a Trapped In Another World story:


                          -----------------------------------------


                          So, the main premise is that our protagonist "hero" likes to role play as non conventional characters, because he finds the idea more entertaining than rehashing the same stuff that everybody else has already done to death.

                          In this particular instance, he decides that he's going to make his character a Kobold Paladin, who's story revolves around becoming a celebrated hero to dragon kin everywhere. Unfortunately, his plan gets ruined when he's transported physically into the game and takes on the form of his avatar.

                          It is at this point where he realizes "Oh shit, platemail is super fucking heavy, and I've got the physical build of a chihuahua!"

                          Now being trapped in a body too physically weak to use any of the gear he picked for his character, our "hero" is forced to solve his problems in the same way that every other Kobold has to do: by getting creative with his methods!

                          He came in to this story expecting to be Ainz Oal Gown, and ends up being more like Goblin Slayer, who achieves his objective by not acting like an over confident moron.

                          After replacing his comparatively useless gear with stuff he can actually equip properly (fashioning armor out of cooking utensils, I guess), the "hero" finds himself a clan of Kobolds who are willing to take him in as one of their own. And this is where his story picks up, because with his out of universe knowledge about the world setting, he's able to construct plans and strategies that regular Kobolds wouldn't come up with.

                          This allows his adoptive clan to begin fighting back against enemies who would otherwise be too powerful to defeat, short of of the Zapp Brannigan tactic of throwing waves of soldiers at them. And this level of strategic brilliance causes his rise to fame among the other Kobolds, who gradually begin to spread tales of him to nearby allies, who eventually do the same.

                          By the end of the story, our "hero" fulfills his dream of becoming a legendary hero of dragon kin, not by being over leveled and having an unreasonable amount of willpower, but by being resourceful and taking the threat seriously!


                          -----------------------------------------


                          I like this story idea, because it's a different take on the usual Trapped in Another World story, in which the character finds themselves extremely under powered, while such stories usually feature an over powered protagonist.

                          I'm thinking of calling it... Knight of the Kobolds!
                          Last edited by Nyrufa; 11-10-2018, 11:40 PM.

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                          • I would like to point out that, at least in my reading of DnD 5e, Demons don't have much interest in souls in general.

                            Devils in 5e collect souls because those souls directly contribute soldiers to their war effort. It's why Asmodeus assigns quotas to the Archdevils. Demons, on the other hand, have no particular soul trade. The Abyss vomits forth a seemingly endless quantity of demonic life; the presence or absence of souls doesn't seem to affect the Abyss's cancerous growth. Demons just keep multiplying. Only their constant attrition against the Devils, mortals, planar entities, and each other serve to check their numbers. The only reason Demons bother with cults is because a particular Demon Lord's agenda can be furthered by mortal followers.

                            So if a Warlock made a pact with a Devil, and we assume the soul was the price paid for power, I doubt the Demon Lord would care. The real conflict would arise over whether the Warlock-Cleric was now serving two masters. If the Warlock pact includes an obligation to serve the Devil's interests, they'd be pissed that the mortal was now giving allegiance to the Devil's categorical enemies.


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                            • With how amazing the Eberron community has been, I’m really dying to see other settings go onto the Guild.

                              Dark Sun soon, please. I wanna play a trans Templar bride of Nibenay.


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                              • So, Mike Mearls is running a 5e D&D stream set in Nentir Vale

                                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjFz8IciRmQ&t=0s

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