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  • I now want to play an Oathbreaker Paladin.

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    • So this week, more than a half of the players are missing, so it felt wrong to continue with the campaign in the current state. As such, I proposed them that we'll run a one shot, and they agreed. It is done in the same homebrew setting, only in a different time frame (like, around 10,000 years back in time :P). More than that, as it is a time of the beginning of the "dark age" (all of the continent being conquered by evil races, etc), we have also decided that this is going to be an "evil campaign", with evil characters in an evil party fighting the decaying forces of good. We have a tiefling, fallen aasimar, dragonborn and a drow (as NPC, as the group is too small). That's going to be fun :P


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      "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

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      • Originally posted by LostLight View Post
        So this week, more than a half of the players are missing, so it felt wrong to continue with the campaign in the current state. As such, I proposed them that we'll run a one shot, and they agreed. It is done in the same homebrew setting, only in a different time frame (like, around 10,000 years back in time :P). More than that, as it is a time of the beginning of the "dark age" (all of the continent being conquered by evil races, etc), we have also decided that this is going to be an "evil campaign", with evil characters in an evil party fighting the decaying forces of good. We have a tiefling, fallen aasimar, dragonborn and a drow (as NPC, as the group is too small). That's going to be fun :P

        You call that a one shot, but if I could get my hands on the new edition books, and a group, I'd want to design an entire campaign around that concept!

        Always wanted to try a story from the evil monster's point of view. A desire which has only increased with the focus of this season's isekei anime genre.

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        • So we played the one shot, and near its end the party stumbled upon two couatls in the dungeon. The plan was that they would put all of the party members into sleep using their poison, and than bring them to the inner chamber where they will fight the boss fight. Three characters succumb to the poison by quickly failing the saving throw of DC 13 (which is not that high, especially as they were level 5, but still). The warlock is the only one left standing, before two, unharmed couatls. Then the player says few infamous words-

          "I cast Summon Lesser Demons"

          He rolled 6, and then, literally, all hell broke loose.

          We never reached the boss fight because of that, but it was fun. There was also a moment when both the warlock and the dragonborn fought bout a place to hide in the circle from the demons, which ended with the dragonborn trying to lift the warlock and put her on his head- only to fail and drop her outside. In exchange, the warlock sent her imp to try to push the dragonborn outside- the dragonborn got 8, and the imp natural 20. All of that while eight dretches claw their way through the poor coatles, only to get killed by the drow and aasimar. Later, when they discovered that it was not the boss fight (which their reaction to it was "WHAT?!"), they asked what I also planned for them- which was a beholder zombie, a young brass dragon and an druidic high priestess with the help of a guardian naga as the boss. I haven't told them that in the end, there was also a chance for a tarrasque to get awakened by the priestess. It was really fun :P


          My Homebrew Signature

          "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

          I now blog in here

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          • Originally posted by LostLight View Post
            "I cast Summon Lesser Demons"

            He rolled 6, and then, literally, all hell broke loose.

            Hey, it's not an evil campaign, unless the protagonists resort to an extremely reckless maneuver when things aren't going their way!

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            • So my work group finished the crashed spaceship adventure, were warned about something coming from the stars, jumped into some escape pods, and then got launched miles away into the mountains. Now they're going to have to find their way back to civilization (who's trade network is still getting choked out by goblin bandits). Working on some local barbarian tribes, a lost temple to touch on some of the world history, and figure out how the area they're from is suffering from the choked trade. A good busy weekend of planning.

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              • Been watching a few videos on how to design a magic system in games and stories. Personally, if I made one, it would be a hybridization of Hard and Soft magic. Taking heavy inspiration from the idea that reality is just an illusion, the concept behind the system would be that magic users are capable of doing quite literally anything they can imagine with the forces they wield.

                As for the restrictions placed upon their magic, it would come down to two things: first is the caster's imagination, and what they are trying to accomplish with the spells they wield. The second would be the strength of their willpower, and how it conflicts with the world around them.

                My explanation for why magic users aren't running around like unstoppable gods of reality is because all sapient beings are actually subconsciously using magic without realizing it. Those not trained in the art, or aware of the universe's illusionary status have convinced themselves that the universe is real and has rules to follow. So their collective mentality works to enforce such a reality upon the world. When a magic caster attempts to alter reality, they are pitting their own willpower against the rest of the world, and they need enough focus to overpower that collective mentality with their own will.

                As such, most magic users can only affect a limited area around themselves, and it becomes more difficult according to how many other people are with them at the time. Additionally, when two or more magic users battle each other, their magic engages in a clash of wills. Whoever has more focus and willpower than the other will end up overpowering the other in terms of magical capabilities. The duration of their spell's effects would also depend on how long the spell caster can maintain their focus before the collective perception of reality starts to overwrite their handiwork.

                Of course, this also means that when a magic user is ultimately destroyed somehow, the effects of their magic immediately begin to dissipate, as they can no longer generate the willpower needed to sustain the spell's effects. Particularly vindictive magic users, however, often learn ways to sustain their wills even after a physical death, allowing for spells to persist beyond their normal life spans. Other magic users take inspiration from the unenlightened masses and work together in cabals and covens. By combining their efforts during the casting process, they can assert more willpower and unleash stronger effects than a single magic user ever could. Unfortunately, getting everybody to agree to perform the same spell at once is a tricky process, and most groups require many years of team building exercises, before they are able to unleash their true potential.

                Finally, there would be the codified "schools" of magic, created by previous magic users in order to make the casting process easier. It's much more difficult for somebody to will a spell into existence, compared to somebody who believes they are following a step by step process to getting the job done. Due to the universe being an illusion, these "schools" don't actually exist, but the belief that they exist makes it easier for magic users to wrap their head around the process of using magic.

                -------------------------

                Sources of Inspiration:

                Mage: the Ascension

                The Warp (Warhammer 40k)

                Simulation Theory

                School of Alteration (Elder Scrolls)



                ------------------------------

                What do you guys, think? Sound like a good idea?
                Last edited by Nyrufa; 01-14-2019, 03:13 PM.

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                • You’re describing Mage: the Ascension.


                  Onyx Path Forum Moderator

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                  • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                    You’re describing Mage: the Ascension.

                    Yeah, pretty much. I did say it was inspired by such systems. But I've actually had this idea for a magic system before I even found out about M:tA.

                    I have never been a fan of the idea that magic was limited by any kind of hard rules. To me, the phrase "magic" is almost synonymous with "miraculous." It should allow people to do the impossible.

                    In the past, I've been willing to accept the idea that whatever rules govern magic were implemented eons ago by deific beings, but I don't accept that such rules are a fundamental aspect of the magical process. There's criminals for every kind of law, and it only makes sense that magic would have its own fair share of people who don't care what the gods have to say on the matter, and seek to bypass such restrictions.


                    Don't get me wrong, I completely understand why other people think magic should have a hard rule system. But I personally am not a fan of it, so I prefer a softer approach with only slightly hard guidelines.
                    Last edited by Nyrufa; 01-14-2019, 07:22 PM.

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                    • Is there any difference between it and Ascension, though?

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                      • Originally posted by nofather View Post
                        Is there any difference between it and Ascension, though?

                        Well, my system doesn't employ the use of paradox, for one.

                        But again, I didn't find out about M:tA until just a few years ago.

                        I'm glad to see there's an officially published game out there that uses such an approach to magic casting.

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                        • Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
                          Well, my system doesn't employ the use of paradox, for one.
                          It kind of does - you mention that magic gets more difficult the more people are around. That’s what Paradox does. I mean, there’s more to it than that, but that’s part of it.

                          Don’t get me wrong though. Ascension is cool, and there’s nothing wrong with using its magic system (or a very similar one) in other games if you like it. Just noting that the system you came up with independently does exist in a pretty well-known IP.


                          Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                          My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                          Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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                          • Originally posted by nofather View Post
                            Is there any difference between it and Ascension, though?
                            Rolling d20s

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                            • I just finished a fantastic D&D session. Making our way through Sunless Citadel, and my players came to a hall flanked bu three sets of slightly-ajar doors (four of them containing giant rats, which will attack if they hear the party coming down the hall. The rogue sneakily peers into each door one by one, closing each that she finds a rat in, making her Stealth check to close the door quietly each time, although one was a very close call. Once all the doors were securely shut, she carved "rat inside" on each rat-containing door. A little ways further in, my players spot a door thats scuffed on the top (damaged when installing a bell to alert the resident goblins when anyone opens the door.) Suspecting a trap but not knowing its nature, our Monk peers through the crack at the top and makes out a lever that will be set off by opening the door, but not what it will trigger, so she decides to use a dagger to slide through the crack and set off the trap with the door still closed - *ding-a-ling* goes the bell, and our rogue groans, "an alarm..." So, weapons drawn and ready for an ambush, they open the door to find a long hallway full of caltrops, and a crenelated wall on the far side. The goblins rolled well on their stealth, and beat even the Druid's sky-high passive Perception, so they got the drop on the party, but my players were smart. Rather than rushing down the hall, they got the melee fighters out of the way while the ranged fighters took on the goblins from our end of the hall and were able to defeat the goblins easily despite being at a disadvantage. Then the next door, they preemptively checked for another bell trap. Good sign, now I know foreshadowing traps will work well with this group, but there was none. Still, they opened the door slowly and cautiously, and were rewarded by getting the drop on the next group of goblins, again at the far end of a long hall with a crenelated cover wall. This time it was my players surprising the goblins though, and they took a moment to consider their plan of attack. Weighed the benefits and drawbacks of trying to go on the attack, or using magic to scare the goblins off, ended up deciding to go for the sneak attack, and took them down in one round. Brilliant stuff.

                              It may sound like a pretty run-of-the-mill D&D session, but that's the kind of shit I live for. My players interacted with the world by describing what their characters were doing rather than asking permission to make checks. They thought logically and tactically, they came up with excellent plans, and while it didn't work out for them every time, in the end they were fucking triumphant. They made excellent use of all of their resources, and got through a great deal of the dungeon with relatively little damage suffered. I'm so proud of my group right now!
                              Last edited by Charlaquin; 01-15-2019, 03:46 AM.


                              Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                              My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                              Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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                              • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                                It kind of does - you mention that magic gets more difficult the more people are around. That’s what Paradox does. I mean, there’s more to it than that, but that’s part of it.

                                Don’t get me wrong though. Ascension is cool, and there’s nothing wrong with using its magic system (or a very similar one) in other games if you like it. Just noting that the system you came up with independently does exist in a pretty well-known IP.

                                As I'm not an Ascension player, I don't know how accurate this is, but I was under the impression Paradox happened because the two conflicting versions of reality tried to exist at the same time and borked up the universe because of it.

                                In my system, it's either one or the other. The spell is either successful, as the caster desired, or it fizzles out, as they lack sufficient willpower to overwrite reality. In order for an unintended result to occur, the caster would have to be distracted when casting the spell, as the magic relies on them imagining the result and then willing it to happen. Let's say the caster wants to lob a fireball at a target, but they're worried about harming other people in the area. If they can't block out that fear, then there is a chance the spell could misinterpret their desire and either fly off course, or generate a much larger explosion than intended.

                                A duel between magic users would also involve a heavy use of counter magic, in order to block, deflect or nullify the enemy's magic, rather than straining your mental energy trying to overpower them the whole fight.

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