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  • After a stupidly long hiatus I can finally run Dungeon Crawl Classics this Friday with co-workers. They'll be in the heart of the forest, guarding an ancient fae lord to his home. They will be driven into a cave network with giant spiders that are tied to a mysterious artifact that is actually just hyper advanced super tech that went haywire and has been cursing this part of the forest for thousands of years

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    • Originally posted by geeklord1 View Post

      In DCC the cleric class can heal anyone, but if they heal the worshiper of a rival god or of an opposing alignment their chances for a critical failure regarding their casting (DCC is roll to cast)



      Actually, what I meant by restrictive healing would depend on what the deity expects from their followers. For example, a god of battle might command its priests to only use their spells to heal injuries earned in combat, or a god of nature might take issue with saving those who succumb to natural causes. A more evil or selfish deity might demand that the subject pay some kind of fee to the church, before they will agree to lend their support.

      According to the game's mechanics, such restrictions would be a work of pure fluff, but it emphasizes my point on how the table top version opens up new possibilities with how to role play a Cleric. These are not just some support caster you slap onto the party roster. They're religious devotees, and thinking up all the different ways you can portray that in game makes this class a lot more fun than I originally believed.


      Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
      Been curious about this one for years now (even more so after Baldur's Gate 2 Enhanced Edition), but how can you go about having a vampire as a PC character?

      Seems easy to find rules on how to play a Lycanthrope, but when I try looking for examples of a playable vampire, there are either no official details, or they're homebrewed content.
      Okay, so apparently there are no officially canonized rules for vampires as a Player Character. Every attempt at doing so is homebrewed content and is apparently over powered to the point of being game breaking.

      Meanwhile, Lycanthropes gain immunity to non magical weapons that aren't made from silver, and they can spread their disease like a plague by just biting a few people.

      That's disappointing...

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      • So, reflecting back on my idea of a pre-historic world setting, I decided to try expanding upon the idea of a world ruled by monsters.

        This is just the basic concept of what I came up with:


        ----------------------------------------------


        The World of Inverse: Deep within the recesses of the Far Realm, there exists a world similar to the one we know, and yet different from it as well. In this world, civilization developed in the opposite direction from ours, resulting in many savage and monstrous races evolving into highly civilized beings, while the civilized races of our own world regressed into primitive barbarism and decadence. To put it bluntly, it is a world in which monsters rule as the pillars of civilization, while elves, humans, dwarves and the like are seen as wild beasts, who threaten to destroy all that is good in the world.

        In the language of the Far Realm, this world would be called "Eht Dlrow fo Esrevni" but for the sake of simplicity, most people just call it "The World of Inverse!"

        ------------------------------------------

        Culture Swaps: (Half Orc remains largely unchanged)

        Humans = Orcs

        Halflings = Goblins

        Elves = Hobgoblins

        Dwarves = Bugbears

        Gnomes = Kobolds

        Dragonborn = Yuan-Ti Purebloods

        Half Elf = Lizardfolk

        Tiefling = Aasimar


        I'm still not 100% satisfied with the culture swaps, particularly regarding the Half Elf. If anybody has any better suggestion, feel free to say so!
        Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-15-2019, 04:42 PM.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
          So, reflecting back on my idea of a pre-historic world setting, I decided to try expanding upon the idea of a world ruled by monsters.

          This is just the basic concept of what I came up with:


          ----------------------------------------------


          The World of Inverse: Deep within the recesses of the Far Realm, there exists a world similar to the one we know, and yet different from it as well. In this world, civilization developed in the opposite direction from ours, resulting in many savage and monstrous races evolving into highly civilized beings, while the civilized races of our own world regressed into primitive barbarism and decadence. To put it bluntly, it is a world in which monsters rule as the pillars of civilization, while elves, humans, dwarves and the like are seen as wild beasts, who threaten to destroy all that is good in the world.

          In the language of the Far Realm, this world would be called "Eht Dlrow fo Esrevni" but for the sake of simplicity, most people just call it "The World of Inverse!"

          ------------------------------------------

          Culture Swaps: (Half Orc remains largely unchanged)

          Humans = Orcs

          Halflings = Goblins

          Elves = Hobgoblins

          Dwarves = Bugbears

          Gnomes = Kobolds

          Dragonborn = Yuan-Ti Purebloods

          Half Elf = Tibaxi

          Tiefling = Aasimar


          I'm still not 100% satisfied with the culture swaps, particularly regarding the Half Elf. If anybody has any better suggestion, feel free to say so!
          Dragonborn take the elf culture as the ancient race who are considered masters of magic. (They are also kind of monstrous)

          Hobgoblins as the dwarf swap as a martial race who are focused on crafting and have a love of treasure.

          Orcs/half orcs take up the half elf role as diplomats. Though they make deals more through intimidation than through persuasion.

          Tibaxi or Aasimar as human replacement

          Just some ideas
          Last edited by geeklord1; 03-15-2019, 01:33 PM.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by geeklord1 View Post

            Dragonborn take the elf culture as the ancient race who are considered masters of magic. (They are also kind of monstrous)

            Hobgoblins as the dwarf swap as a martial race who are focused on crafting and have a love of treasure.

            Orcs/half orcs take up the half elf role as diplomats. Though they make deals more through intimidation than through persuasion.

            Tibaxi or Aasimar as human replacement

            Just some ideas
            Well, I went with the Yuan-Ti for Dragonborn, based on their original incarnation. In which they were previously humans who underwent a magical ritual to transform into what they are now.

            Bugbears replaced the Dwarves, because I figured "hey, they're gruff and hairy, so why not?"

            In this universe, the Aasimar (and by extension the Celestials) would be portrayed as the very embodiment of evil and corruption, while Tieflings (and by extension the Fiends) would be the symbols of righteousness and purity. So my idea for swapping them out is that the birth of a Tiefling is celebrated as an omen of good fortune, while the birth of an Aasimar is a mark of shame and ridicule.


            I swapped out Orcs with Humans, because I thought it made the most sense in contrast to each other. Humans being highly sophisticated and advanced, while Orcs were more primitive and tribalistic. Now, it's the orcs living in cities and dressing in clean clothes, while humans garb themselves in bloodied pelts and take refuge inside of crudely fashioned tents.
            Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-15-2019, 02:22 PM.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post

              Well, I went with the Yuan-Ti for Dragonborn, based on their original incarnation. In which they were previously humans who underwent a magical ritual to transform into what they are now.

              Bugbears replaced the Dwarves, because I figured "hey, they're gruff and hairy, so why not?"

              In this universe, the Aasimar (and by extension the Celestials) would be portrayed as the very embodiment of evil and corruption, while Tieflings (and by extension the Fiends) would be the symbols of righteousness and purity. So my idea for swapping them out is that the birth of a Tiefling is celebrated as an omen of good fortune, while the birth of an Aasimar is a mark of shame and ridicule.


              I swapped out Orcs with Humans, because I thought it made the most sense in contrast to each other. Humans being highly sophisticated and advanced, while Orcs were more primitive and tribalistic. Now, it's the orcs living in cities and dressing in clean clothes, while humans garb themselves in bloodied pelts and take refuge inside of crudely fashioned tents.
              Ah ok. That makes sense to me. I get your reasoning. With that maybe the lizardfolk as the half elf replacement? The cold blooded cannibalistic race now the diplomats that see all sides of the issue?

              Comment


              • Originally posted by geeklord1 View Post

                Ah ok. That makes sense to me. I get your reasoning. With that maybe the lizardfolk as the half elf replacement? The cold blooded cannibalistic race now the diplomats that see all sides of the issue?

                Yeah, I was considering whether or not to implement them!

                Comment


                • Here's something funny that I thought up when brain storming ideas for Pathfinder: Kingmaker

                  1 - Create one of the halfbreed races (Orc, Elf, Tiefling or Aasimar).

                  2 - Make a Sorcerer, or Eldritch Scion, and pick a non-draconic magical bloodline. For Tieflings, don't pick Abyssal or Infernal. For Aasimar, don't pick Celestial.

                  3 - Become a Dragon Disciple. It will ask you to pick a draconic bloodline when you take the class, if you didn't already do so as a Sorcerer / Eldritch Scion.

                  4 - Have fun trying to explain your family tree!

                  EDIT: Nevermind, it seems they patched being able to stack magical bloodlines on top of each other.
                  Last edited by Nyrufa; 03-17-2019, 07:30 PM.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
                    Okay, so apparently there are no officially canonized rules for vampires as a Player Character. Every attempt at doing so is homebrewed content and is apparently over powered to the point of being game breaking.
                    There IS a kind of official material for Vampire PCs, if you're loose with the word "official". It's in the Plane Shift series of articles, converting Magic: The Gathering settings to DnD 5e. Plane Shift: Zendikar and Plane Shift: Ixalan both have PC racial options for Vampires, albeit stripped of much of the baggage that the monster comes packaged with. Neither of them are undead, for instance, nor do they die in sunlight. But they're also not any more durable or regenerative than a normal PC. It's literally just a regular PC, with some vampire elements bolted on.

                    Heck, they don't even explicitly need to drink blood (they merely gain benefits for doing so). Although that's just the crunch. They're clearly intended to need blood in the fluff, if the cards are any indication.

                    I'd also be remiss if I didn't mention how these articles didn't have, shall we say, the most robust race options. Plane Shift: Ixalan's rules for Goblins, for instance, are clearly inferior to the base Goblin rules in Volo's/Guildmaster's Guide. They lose their Fury of the Small, 5 ft of movement, AND a whole ability score increase (they don't get the boost to Con). The only thing they get in exchange is...a token climbing speed. I think the only reason they cut some of these races down so much in the articles is so they fit on one page each.

                    Which is weird, since half the page is taken up by reused card art. I mean it's lovely art, but they could have shrunk it down if they needed more space!
                    Last edited by Bluecho; 03-18-2019, 03:29 AM.


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                    • Someone new to D&D here.

                      How do wizards cast spells?

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                      • Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
                        Someone new to D&D here.

                        How do wizards cast spells?
                        By... declaring that they cast them and spending slots on them, just like any other spellcaster. That's kind of an amazingly vague question.

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                        • Originally posted by Morty View Post

                          By... declaring that they cast them and spending slots on them, just like any other spellcaster. That's kind of an amazingly vague question.
                          Ok. So in other words, there are a number of slots each wizards has, and each slot holds one spell. And the higher the level of wizard, the more spells?

                          So... they prepare spells first, and then set them off later?

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                          • Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
                            Ok. So in other words, there are a number of slots each wizards has, and each slot holds one spell. And the higher the level of wizard, the more spells?

                            So... they prepare spells first, and then set them off later?
                            Essentially, yes. Clerics and druids work the same way. The exact specifics depend on the edition of D&D. In 3E and older they're more rigid, in 5E they're more flexible and 4E works substantially differently.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Morty View Post

                              Essentially, yes. Clerics and druids work the same way. The exact specifics depend on the edition of D&D. In 3E and older they're more rigid, in 5E they're more flexible and 4E works substantially differently.
                              OK then. Are there any list of spells you give to newbies for wizards?

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Bluecho View Post
                                both have PC racial options for Vampires, albeit stripped of much of the baggage that the monster comes packaged with. Neither of them are undead, for instance, nor do they die in sunlight. But they're also not any more durable or regenerative than a normal PC. It's literally just a regular PC, with some vampire elements bolted on.

                                Heck, they don't even explicitly need to drink blood (they merely gain benefits for doing so).
                                Then what's the point of even playing one? All of that sounds terrible!

                                Guess the closest I can get to playing one is Pathfinder's Dhampirs... Unfortunately, I am a complete newbie when it comes to Pathfinder.

                                There was a vampire companion in Baldur's Gate 2 Enhanced Edition, and she wasn't too overpowered. Granted, that's probably because I had her equipped with a cloak that gave her massive attribute penalties in exchange for being able to walk in the sunlight...

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