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  • Now all that is left is the guide to the DM, I believe


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    "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

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    • Originally posted by LostLight View Post
      Now all that is left is the guide to the DM, I believe
      Well, there's always Matt Colville to tide us over.


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      • Ran Old School Essentials for my co-workers on Friday as a team building exercise (problem solving, pitfalls of over planning, ect) and ran B1 Into the Unknown. OSE is basically just a re printing of the B/X Rules of D&D and I have never actually run that edition before Friday. I thought the different kind of dice rolls aren't intuitive but they are kind of novel in that they keep you on your toes based on what you have to roll so people seemed more engaged than a d20 only (though this could have just been because they were new players) but I think it's kind of neat and fun. There are some cool stuff and I really like the flexibility to just create your own die rolling systems on the fly

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        • So now the internet seems to explode about the upcoming Tasha's Cauldron of Everything- I must say that most of the complains I see about it is because of the way they market the product. If they were to present it as a book of hacks and options (like how Unearthed Arcana was in the previous editions), with optional ways to reskin and personalize characters, both in terms of classes and races and offering both options to simplify 5e or to make it more complex for experienced players, it could have worked a lot better IMO than how it is presented as the "new way to make characters to remove racism from D&D" (which I am not sure it does). I also can't really get WHY they add tons of new subclasses in there, beside the fact that "we had to put them somewhere, right?". Sure, it can be folded under the book's theme of "OPTIONS!", but it does not revise the concept of subclasses in any fundmential way, I think (well, with the exception of adding the Artificer to the "core setting" and adding a psionic subsystem of some kind). It could be useful because that there seem to be this "Core +1" rule that some DMs follow, but as someone who don't use it it feels like a strange use for wordcount, especially in the case of reprinting subclasses.

          So yeah, overall it does seem like it could be useful, but there had to be a better way to market it without causing a fanwar in my facebook... right?


          Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

          "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

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          • Originally posted by LostLight View Post
            So now the internet seems to explode about the upcoming Tasha's Cauldron of Everything- I must say that most of the complains I see about it is because of the way they market the product. If they were to present it as a book of hacks and options (like how Unearthed Arcana was in the previous editions), with optional ways to reskin and personalize characters, both in terms of classes and races and offering both options to simplify 5e or to make it more complex for experienced players, it could have worked a lot better IMO than how it is presuented as the "new way to make characters to remove racism from D&D" (which I am not sure it does).
            I don’t think they are marketing it that way. Some fans have taken it that way, but the way WotC is pitching it very much “here’s a bunch of hacks and options.”

            Originally posted by LostLight View Post
            I also can't really get WHY they add tons of new subclasses in there, beside the fact that "we had to put them somewhere, right?". Sure, it can be folded under the book's theme of "OPTIONS!", but it does not revise the concept of subclasses in any fundmential way, I think (well, with the exception of adding the Artificer to the "core setting" and adding a psionic subsystem of some kind).
            This is the 5e publishing model. They’ve been doing it this way for pretty much the whole edition. 5e doesn’t do “player’s guide to whatever” or “the complete book of somesuch” or “monster manual 2.” It does Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, Volo’s Guide to Monsters, Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes... This is basically just Xanathar’s Guide 2: Even more subclasses, optional hacks, and magic items. That anyone is surprised by this is strange to me.

            Originally posted by LostLight View Post
            It could be useful because that there seem to be this "Core +1" rule that some DMs follow, but as someone who don't use it it feels like a strange use for wordcount, especially in the case of reprinting subclasses.
            That’s not a “some DMs” thing, it’s an organized play thing. “PHB +1” is the official rule for adventurer’s league. It’s also very pro-consumer to reprint options that have previously only appeared in setting-specific books in a generic book of options. This way, anyone who likes the idea of the Artificer but isn’t interested in Eberron can get access to the subclass without having to buy a book for a setting they don’t care about.

            Originally posted by LostLight View Post
            So yeah, overall it does seem like it could be useful, but there had to be a better way to market it without causing a fanwar in my facebook... right?
            I don’t think it’s WotC’s fault if an optional rule for customizing character origin that decouples ability score increases from race sets up Staus-Quo Warriors’ hackles.


            Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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            • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
              I don’t think they are marketing it that way. Some fans have taken it that way, but the way WotC is pitching it very much “here’s a bunch of hacks and options.”
              I've read an interview with Crawford where, while he stated it as optional, he also mentioned a number of times that it is meant to deal "with that problem". And when every review article that I see about the book talks about "how Tasha's Cauldron solves the race problem", it is very much a marketing problem- because if WOTC do not intend for it to be branded that way, they fail at their work. So yeah, not controlling how your product is being branded IS a marketing problem.


              This is the 5e publishing model. They’ve been doing it this way for pretty much the whole edition. 5e doesn’t do “player’s guide to whatever” or “the complete book of somesuch” or “monster manual 2.” It does Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, Volo’s Guide to Monsters, Mordenkainen’s Tome of Foes... This is basically just Xanathar’s Guide 2: Even more subclasses, optional hacks, and magic items. That anyone is surprised by this is strange to me.
              I'm not surprised, I just feel like it is a bit artifical. I think that books need to have a theme, and it is hard for me to see the theme here beyond "OPTIONS!"

              That’s not a “some DMs” thing, it’s an organized play thing. “PHB +1” is the official rule for adventurer’s league. It’s also very pro-consumer to reprint options that have previously only appeared in setting-specific books in a generic book of options. This way, anyone who likes the idea of the Artificer but isn’t interested in Eberron can get access to the subclass without having to buy a book for a setting they don’t care about.
              Ah- I do not play Adventurer's League and know nothing about it beside that it helps those people who can't find a group to play a game and that all of my friends who tried it felt it was very restirictive. I guess it makes sense for such a format.

              I don’t think it’s WotC’s fault if an optional rule for customizing character origin that decouples ability score increases from race sets up Staus-Quo Warriors’ hackles.
              Again, it is a problem if you mean your product to be branded as an optional hacking book and it is branded by the fandom as something else. Also, the way it looks like it seems to suggest a format to make an easy costumization of race traits- and not just the ability scores. I could only know how I feel towards it once I'll see it, so I am not judging anything up until now- but I really don't like how it was presented (again, from an interview with Crawford and the way that it is presented in the reviews). If they wanted to market it as "new and clean way to play D&D", it is a bad marketing which only causes conflict within the fandom. If they didn't than they don't have control over their own marketing, which is even worse.


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              • I mean, there is a "race" problem, but it's a more of a mechanical one and the way that race can become a block when making character creation (some races make for stronger character classes than others and players can sometimes feel compelled to make a character of one race as opposed to another because of those bonuses).

                However I think when some people saw Crawford said that there was a "race problem," in light of current political events they immediately looked at it more like racism as a problem, as opposed to a mechanical character customization problem. That like, when Crawford said that, he was suggesting that when the game says that Elves get a bonus to Dexterity, that that somehow correlates to or even props up real world racism and this book is supposed to "undo" that which is kind of dumb.

                And those people took that dumb interpretation and ran with it and then got mad about it, which is, again, dumb.

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                • I Just bought Denizens of Darkness. Halflings vampires are fun

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                  • Anyway, so with the news about WotC planning to update three classic settings to 5e, which ones would you like to see? I personally hope for Dragonlance, Dark Sun and an actual Ravenloft setting (with the later two being very likely, I think, and the first being an hopefull wish as according to some former Dragonlance team member WotC do not seem to be really into Dragonlance for reasons). I would also see Nentir Vale as a pleasent surprise (even though I must admit it more likely that we'll get almost any other setting than this one, as WotC seem to try their best to avoid controversy, which doesn't really work for them saying the truth), and I know that a lot of people also wish for Mystara (which I do like) or Greyhawk (which I honestly can't get why people are so frustrated about, as it is a pretty standard setting?).


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                    • Really, I just want them to open up the Guild to settings they aren't interested in but other people are.


                      He/His Pronouns | Currently writing: Tome of the Pentacle (OPP), Better Feared: Nosferatu (STV)

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                      • Yeah, that would be ideal- but honestly I think it is more likely that we'll get Nentir Vale before they would just "open all settings". Wizards seem to really like controlling their material- again, Dragonlance is a good example for it, as there were many disputes between them and the writers during the late 3e (I remember Margaret Wise claiming that Wizards hired a shadow author to write Dragons of Hourglass Mage instead of her under her name and I do tend to believe her, and I also remember claims that Wizards killed the Dragonlance novels because they wanted to control the setting and make sure things go as they see fitting- and tyhe game hasn't returned since this whole mess).


                        Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

                        "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

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                        • Originally posted by LostLight View Post
                          Anyway, so with the news about WotC planning to update three classic settings to 5e, which ones would you like to see? I personally hope for Dragonlance, Dark Sun and an actual Ravenloft setting (with the later two being very likely, I think, and the first being an hopefull wish as according to some former Dragonlance team member WotC do not seem to be really into Dragonlance for reasons). I would also see Nentir Vale as a pleasent surprise (even though I must admit it more likely that we'll get almost any other setting than this one, as WotC seem to try their best to avoid controversy, which doesn't really work for them saying the truth), and I know that a lot of people also wish for Mystara (which I do like) or Greyhawk (which I honestly can't get why people are so frustrated about, as it is a pretty standard setting?).

                          I'd love to see some Spelljammer.

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                          • So now it seems that Dragonlance's writers (Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman) are suing WotC because the company has ordered a new trilogy from them, and after they submitted the first draft in August they decided to break the contract without giving an official reason. Could be because of some public criticism that they made towards WotC. I can't say how annoyed I am, and it becomes really hard for me to enjoy D&D. It feels like WotC just don't like Margaret and Tracy or that they have some personal reason to do hate Dragonlance as they do such annoying things every time they touch it. Really, it pisses me off.


                            Check my STV content, Or My Homebrew

                            "And all our knowledge is, Ourselves to know"- An Essay on Man

                            I now blog in here

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                            • im doing a D&D game with the white wolf system, OWOD to be specific.

                              I have never played D&D , I literally started with vampire and never strayed far. I have done TONS of mage the ascension. like literally 20 years of playing and STing mage. I've also done a ton of stuff with my own rules hacks, like starwars, rifts, wheel of time; all with home-brew rules based on the spheres or disciplines (I ran Star Wars using the psi powers and paths from the mage revised sourcebook "Sorcerer" with some major rules changes)
                              \.
                              Now im doing DnD. I played Baldurs Gate 1 and 2, also Icewind dale. I know the setting, I know the basic gist of it all: rangers, paladins, gods of this or that, chromatic dragon; all the basic shit. I can whip up a class for each player on the fly, that's not the problem. its just that I'm seeking advice from those that know.

                              I'd like to hear what OTHERS HAVE TO SAY. is there any advice out there for me from those who have don it before and know they way? lol

                              anything like words of wisdom, caution and anecdotes of experience would help.
                              Last edited by Zennis; 10-26-2020, 05:12 AM.

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                              • So it seems like an awkward time to bring this up - what with a WotC exec behaving with such "Contract Breeching" levels of childish petulance when it comes to Weis and Hickman - but they dropped another UA subclasses article.

                                This one is all about dragons. I was instantly curious. Then I found out Rangers would be getting a dragon companion, and now they have my attention.


                                The first is the Ascendant Dragon Monk, which is so solid and built around elemental attacks, I daresay it does that kind of thing better than the Four Elements Monk ever did. Or at least it seems more usable. The ability to make Unarmed Strikes do elemental damage instead of physical - FOR FREE - is pretty sick. As is the ability to breath [Element], without burning Ki to do it (though you can get extra uses by spending Ki). It also does that thing many subclass playtests are doing, which is having a feature that benefits the whole party, not just the character. I like it.

                                The second is the Drakewarden Ranger, which turns you into the protagonist from How To Train Your Dragon. You summon a "drake", a small draconic creature (that grows to Large at level 15) that can be commanded in battle. Unfortunately, it's a summon with a limited duration per day, so you can't have it hang around at all times. Alas, no snuggling with the baby dragon during long rests.

                                Many people will no doubt be heartbroken. Including me.

                                On the plus side, as stated before, it gets Large eventually, allowing you to eventually ride it as a mount. Which is exactly what we've always wanted out of a dragon companion. Additionally, the Drakewarden gets a lot of that elemental damage dealing/resistance that other draconic subclasses get.


                                For a while, I've been toying with a handful of high concept campaign ideas. I'll probably get into those at a later date, but one of them is a War Campaign between multiple nations that have a strong dragon presence. As in, a bunch of metallic dragons have backed various princes and provided them with power, and it's now time for them to all go to war over who becomes the next emperor.

                                It takes a few thematic cues from Dragonlance (again, awkward given recent events). I figured in addition to the players all running active participants in the conflict (soldiers), it would be a chance to dig deep into the draconic parts of D&D. Including Draconic bloodline Sorcerers. As such, these two new subclasses make me want to run that campaign even more, and to start figuring out how dragon monasteries would factor into the political and social landscape. (For those wondering, it's still pseudo-European, not Asian; think less Romance of the Three Kingdoms, and more Holy Roman Empire. Fitting, though it would be, to have dragon-themed martial artists in the Asian mold).
                                Last edited by Bluecho; 10-29-2020, 06:17 AM.


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