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Why is Climate Change so controversial?

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  • #61
    Tbf the wind turbines in those other places are made to function in the cold, a few years ago when Texas had a cold snap an independent commission recommended a winterizing program for not only their renewable power sources but also the coal and natural gas ones. *spoiler alert* they didn't get followed.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
      Fox and the governor of Texas are trying to paint the power outages as being evidence against the efficacy of the Green New Deal, which I’ll remind you, did not pass in Congress. The wind turbines actually provided more electricity than was projected, but the fossil fuel-based power plants that provide 80% of the state’s energy was where the failures happened.

      It’s essentially a case of Republicans in charge shitting their own pants, and then trying to blame it on “the left.”
      Like the cold Nordic countries have some of the greatest uses of renewable energy

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Dwight View Post
        Tbf the wind turbines in those other places are made to function in the cold, a few years ago when Texas had a cold snap an independent commission recommended a winterizing program for not only their renewable power sources but also the coal and natural gas ones. *spoiler alert* they didn't get followed.
        Reminds the plot of banal disaster films. Everyone said what to do and everyone understood how, but in reality "no one needs anything."

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        • #65
          fun fact but useful

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          • #66
            A lot of the information from John Oliver's episode on plastics is also applicable to climate change as a whole.


            He/him

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            • #67
              Can you give me a link to the source? I can't find it.

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              • #68
                His show is on HBO, I'm no sure where else you can get it besides HBO's channel or streaming service.

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                • #69
                  His shows are usually posted on the show's YouTube channel. but they aren't always immediately available. If you search Last Week Tonight plastics, it will probably show up.


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                  • #70
                    I all the time watch John Oliver on Youtube - his episode on Plastic below.



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                    • #71
                      Why WE MUST have Nuclear Energy ☢️ to stop Climate Change on Earth! 🌍 ( In a Nutshell video analysis. )





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                      • #72
                        I think that video is rather more tempered for good reason.

                        For those that don't watch it, the video makes the case that nuclear power is the only logical way to transition off of fossil fuels and reduce emissions in a timely fashion. I think it does a good job of that argument, but it is honest in that it isn't a "must" as much as "the way that makes the most sense of our current options."

                        For example, one of the reasons to argue for large investments in nuclear power is that energy demand keeps going up at a very high rate; a rate that is currently exceeding renewable energy's ability to scale up. The rate in which renewable energy sources are being improved, installed/replaced, and expanded to consumers isn't matching the rate of increased demand. We could put lots and lots (and lots) more money into that conflict (both sides even; reducing demand and increasing renewable output) but there's a limit to how effective that is and we don't really know if we can do that and meet the projected needs to keep climate change in check. Modern nuclear plants, in terms of practical cost, can be installed with that investment instead for a technology we know will result a massive drop in emissions at scale, and without having to solve electrical grid issues like storing and releasing renewable energy efficiently to create a constant supply out of variable sources. There's also a bunch of very promising nuclear power technologies that are already proven on small scale, that could use a major investment for scaling up and reduce the negatives of nuclear further.

                        So even if the end goal is to get to as much renewable power as possible, nuclear is the most rational bridge from now to then taking as many factors as possible into account.

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