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Aquaculture!

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  • Aquaculture!

    I've just been thinking. We can make some funny stuff using aquaculture. Algae grows and reproduces much much faster than using normal crops and plants, capable of doubling their population in 24 hours. In fact, algae blooms are considered to be a problem due to the increased runoff from agriculture of things like phosphorous and nitrogen. Since a whole lot of fish eat algae, you can probably turn the biomass from the algae (I think there's no food that uses it) and turn it into fish flesh to be eaten, either by shrimp or filter feeding fish or snails. Or maybe shellfish. Like oysters, who have a noted tendency to filter out the water they feed on and reproduce in large numbers.

    Issue comes with having to take care of highly volatile algae which also contain things like cyanobacteria, who are capable of massive ecological devastation and release toxins that literally no other creature consumes. You might want to genetically engineer algae types which are more efficient and also murder any kind of cyanobacteria in its crib before they can spread out and wipe out your 'crop'. Types of fish would be desired as well, probably something fast growing and really hardy, like tilapia or shrimp (hopefully genetically engineered for fast growth and genetics that prevent them from breeding in the wild). Aeration should be done, although I lack the google-fu skills to really know about how a mechanical aeration of the local pond would affect both algae and larger scale multicellular life.

    Hopefully this would be useful for things like preventing overfishing and having a precious protein source in the form of fish and shellfish.

  • #2
    There's some interesting work in trying to do aquaculture kelp (and similar algae) farming in the US. Kelp is functional as a food source for humans directly, unlike blooms it creates a much more stable ecosystem (and can absorb a lot of run off), and promotes good habitats for shellfish farming (oysters, mussels, etc.) and nurseries for young fish to help replenish those populations.

    It's also something people have been doing in Asia and Oceania for a very long time so it's a better known method rather than trying to use smaller algal species.

    There's still plenty of issues, like all farming, but it's worth looking into if you interested in the topic.

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    • #3
      There are many nuances of aquaculture. Don't you think that normal crops and plants work fine for now? Of course, no one knows what's going to be like in the future, but I don't think that agronomists will ever be without a job. Well, we can only think about it, and maybe you're right that algae may be useful too.

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      • #4
        Algae are useful. Traditional aquaculture has been around for thousands of years and is a staple crop in some parts of the world. There are already modern aquaculture operations in areas where it's a relatively new approach. We don't have to "just think about it," we can actually look at facts on the ground of how it's going and think about what that means for future efforts.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
          Since a whole lot of fish eat algae, you can probably turn the biomass from the algae (I think there's no food that uses it) and turn it into fish flesh to be eaten, either by shrimp or filter feeding fish or snails.
          Are you saying
          - Grow algae, harvest it and then turn it into a more highly concentrated food-substance that you drop into the water for the shrimp/fish/snails?
          - Grow algae and then pour it in the water to be eaten as normal?

          Here's something:
          Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)
          https://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/re...EGA/index.html
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-HE4Hfa-OY



          He/Him... I just Love Witches. I am here for conversation rather than formal debate. My Hacks.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by HorizonParty2021 View Post

            Are you saying
            - Grow algae, harvest it and then turn it into a more highly concentrated food-substance that you drop into the water for the shrimp/fish/snails?
            - Grow algae and then pour it in the water to be eaten as normal?

            Here's something:
            Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae (OMEGA)
            https://www.nasa.gov/centers/ames/re...EGA/index.html
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-HE4Hfa-OY
            The first.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Heavy Arms View Post
              There's some interesting work in trying to do aquaculture kelp (and similar algae) farming in the US. Kelp is functional as a food source for humans directly, unlike blooms it creates a much more stable ecosystem (and can absorb a lot of run off), and promotes good habitats for shellfish farming (oysters, mussels, etc.) and nurseries for young fish to help replenish those populations.

              It's also something people have been doing in Asia and Oceania for a very long time so it's a better known method rather than trying to use smaller algal species.

              There's still plenty of issues, like all farming, but it's worth looking into if you interested in the topic.
              Algae are no doubt can play their role towards a good ecosystem.


              Travel Enthusiast who loves to travel around the world with new travel backpacks.

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              • #8
                To take a somewhat more macro-scale take on that, algae and other aquatic autotrophs essentially define what a good ecosystem is on this planet. Even plants are dependent on them in the long run. Happy algae mean a strong ecosystem, and the only real role they need to play is as a feedback to us for whether or not what we're doing is bad for ecosystem.

                The fact that there are lots of ways we can keep algae happy while using them to help clean up our mistakes is just a giant plus for how awesome they are.

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                • #9
                  Fishmeal is the standard diet of fish raised in aquaculture. It can consist of small fish, wheat byproducts, lecithin (a chocolate substitute) and just about anything that's economical and nutritive to the fish being raised. The idea that, since fish eat algae, it might be useful to use concentrated algae as a fishmeal additive or replacement has been considered by people in aquiculture trying to maximize efficiency. With my green belt in Google-fu, I used the search terms, "adding algae to fishmeal". I came up with the following:

                  Use as an alternative to fishmeal
                  https://thefishsite.com/articles/the...es-to-fishmeal

                  Feeding micro-algae to Tilapia
                  https://www.ateneo.edu/ls/sose/atene...t-could-reduce
                  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-75289-x

                  YouTube, terms, "algae as fishmeal replacement". The following:
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rW9yk_U6z1U Title: "TRANSFORMING ALGAE INTO FISH FOOD"

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2INQrRiKMmM

                  Hope these are useful.


                  He/Him... I just Love Witches. I am here for conversation rather than formal debate. My Hacks.

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