Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

You Know What I Hate MK I

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Even through silent medium stupid people somehow manage to be really loud.

    Comment


    • Seriously. No one's saying it isn't a flawed series, and I get annoyed with some of the overhype on fandom's part(boy howdy, do I just not care what house you are in on quiz number 18)-but let's also be honest, the scale and breadth of it's impact, whether we discuss it as a piece of literature, a piece of society, commerically, financially, etc., does make Harry Potter an important part of the literary canon, and it is probably not wrong to also assume that with how books are being consumed now and how that affects the ideas of literary canon, it may be the last entry into that canon with a true depth of claim for a long time coming.

      Doesn't hurt that while, yes, it's not the true heights of writing in several senses, it's still good, and definitely better than a lot of other media out there. Sure beats the fuck out of Wheel of Time, I'll tell you that much.


      Sean K.I.W. Steele, Freelance Writer
      Work Blog Coming Soon
      The world is not beautiful, therefore it is.-Keiichi Sigsawa, Kino's Journey
      Male/neutral pronouns accepted, female pronouns enjoyed.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by nofather View Post
        Even through silent medium stupid people somehow manage to be really loud.

        I don't appreciate being called stupid because I don't like a book or its extremely vocal fandom.

        Look, I'm not saying that Harry Potter is bad because it's a children's book. It's a good book for what it is, which is Young Adult pop fiction. Nothing wrong with that. I myself love pop entertainment and don't care much for "high art" (that's part of why I despise personal horror in gaming)

        What I am saying is that I don't care for the books personally and I really don't like the loud fans who act like Harry Potter is some great work of high art and act like I'm some sort of Philistine for not enjoying the books.

        The books just don't appeal to me, and neither does its fandom.
        Last edited by Camilla; 08-08-2018, 05:09 PM.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by Camilla View Post
          I don't appreciate being called stupid because I don't like a book or its extremely vocal fandom.
          You should probably direct this to the people commenting about you, as I was not, it's not all about you.

          Though I admit your post certainly did remind me of it as something I've been dwelling on for a while. Tweets, forum posts, even pictures.

          I've never read Harry Potter or watched all the movies so couldn't speak for them, I don't really interact with any vocal fans of theirs, and your opinions on Japanese cartoons and comics versus American movies and comics have already been noted.

          Comment


          • I have an ophthalmic visit today (nothing bad, just a check-up), but there are good odds I'll have to get some drops in my eyes.

            Always hated that, those burn like hell and make me unable to read or watch anything for half a day. Awful.


            Cinder's Comprehensive Collection of Creations - Homebrew Hub

            I write about Beast: The Primordial a lot

            This is what I'm working on

            Comment


            • “I understand that what I’m doing is bad, and has its roots in a lot of really horrible stereotypes that continue to hurt real people today. But I want to do it in my art anyway, because I think it’s hot!”


              Call me Regina or Lex.

              Female pronouns for me, please.

              Comment


              • Since Harry Potter came up, I hate pretty much everything that Rowling has added to the canon since completing the series. I loved those books for what they were - a long-running children’s series whose tone gradually matured alongside its audience. But it’s done. The series concluded, and everything she’s tried to do since to milk the setting further has only served to kill the magic of the original story and flagrantly display just how out of touch the series’ success has made her.

                To extend that specific grievance to a more general form, I hate when writers try to drag their work out beyond its natural conclusion. Why can’t we just let good works be finished when they’re finished, and take satisfaction in a story well-told? The most beloved, time-tested works are the ones that didn’t overstay their welcome, so why do we insist on dragging stories on until even the most devoted fans grow sick of them?
                Last edited by Charlaquin; 08-11-2018, 01:59 AM.


                Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                  Since Harry Potter came up, I hate pretty much everything that Rowling has added to the canon since completing the series. I loved those books for what they were - a long-running children’s series whose tone gradually matured alongside its audience. But it’s done. The series concluded, and everything she’s tried to do since to milk the setting further has only served to kill the magic of the original story and flagrantly display just how out of touch the series’ success has made her.

                  To extend that specific grievance to a more general form, I hate when writers try to drag their work out beyond its natural conclusion. Why can’t we just let good works be finished when they’re finished, and take satisfaction in a story well-told? The most beloved, time-tested works are the ones that didn’t overstay their welcome, so why do we insist on dragging stories on until even the most devoted fans grow sick of them?
                  This I am 100% behind. I refuse to go see Fantastic Beasts.


                  Freelancer (He/His Pronouns): CofD- Dark Eras 2; Scion - Mysteries of the World

                  CofD booklists: Beast I Changeling | Demon (TBA) | Deviant (TBA) | Geist l Hunter l Mage | Mummy | Promethean | Vampire | Werewolf (WIP)

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                    Since Harry Potter came up, I hate pretty much everything that Rowling has added to the canon since completing the series. I loved those books for what they were - a long-running children’s series whose tone gradually matured alongside its audience. But it’s done. The series concluded, and everything she’s tried to do since to milk the setting further has only served to kill the magic of the original story and flagrantly display just how out of touch the series’ success has made her.

                    To extend that specific grievance to a more general form, I hate when writers try to drag their work out beyond its natural conclusion. Why can’t we just let good works be finished when they’re finished, and take satisfaction in a story well-told? The most beloved, time-tested works are the ones that didn’t overstay their welcome, so why do we insist on dragging stories on until even the most devoted fans grow sick of them?
                    The best TV shows are written with an ending and run for a season or two.

                    Wish more folks understood that.


                    Call me Regina or Lex.

                    Female pronouns for me, please.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                      Since Harry Potter came up, I hate pretty much everything that Rowling has added to the canon since completing the series. I loved those books for what they were - a long-running children’s series whose tone gradually matured alongside its audience. But it’s done. The series concluded, and everything she’s tried to do since to milk the setting further has only served to kill the magic of the original story and flagrantly display just how out of touch the series’ success has made her.
                      The cynical part of me is says she's just writing for the money. On the other hand from what I've heard, Rowling isn't overly greedy or enamoured with flagrant displays of wealth, so I don't know if she's only writing to make a buck. And she's certainly wealthy enough that if she didn't enjoy writing then she'd never have to write again, nor would she spend her time writing stuff she didn't want to write about.

                      So in her case, I think maybe she's continuing to write stories in the Harry Potter universe simply because she honestly enjoys the world she created and likes writing about it. But, you know, there's still that cynical part of me.
                      Last edited by AnubisXy; 08-11-2018, 11:50 AM.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                        The series concluded, and everything she’s tried to do since to milk the setting further has only served to kill the magic of the original story and flagrantly display just how out of touch the series’ success has made her.
                        One particular instance that bugs me is when she tries to patch weak spots in her story and in doing so makes it even weaker.

                        The fourth book's entire plot could have been resolved successfully, with good triumphing over evil by Harry just sitting on his ass and not doing the challenges that he was established as not wanting to do. Which is fine; Harry didn't know that, after all. But instead we got a statement later in which having your name in the Goblet constitutes a magical oath akin to the Unbreakable Vow, so Harry would have to compete, even if he didn't want to.

                        Except, remember, Harry didn't put his name in. So some powerful Dark wizard can basically snuff out your life by writing your name in an enchanted MacGuffin, now. Voldemort could've won if Death Note had been published just a little earlier.

                        Comment


                        • I've always felt that Rowling's biggest problem is that she doesn't know what to write, and keeps going back to Potterverse because it's what she knows and is comfortable with... which isn't great for quality as she clearly doesn't want to put in the work to research cultures she's not as familiar with, so everything is from an obviously biased perspective.

                          But to an extent (and I don't mean this to be antagonistic to Wil's point) I don't like the "natural conclusion" thing. Really big fictional settings like the Potterverse don't have a natural conclusion. Harry's particular part in it does.

                          I was never a big Harry Potter fan, because the books came out at the wrong time for me. Had I been a bit younger, I'd have loved them because totally my jam, and had I been a bit older, I might have appreciated them more. As it stood, I emotionally didn't want anything to do with YA focused properties. Fantastic Beasts was actually what drew me into things because Newt is a character that spoke to me far more than the original books did, even if I appreciate them a lot more now. What I hate is that Newt's story is going to become subservient towards being a prequel to Harry's story rather than being allowed to do it's own thing.

                          To me that's where the problem lies. Rowling could write Potter stuff for the rest of her life and it could be awesome, but she'd have to let go of tying everything back to Harry's story.

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
                            One particular instance that bugs me is when she tries to patch weak spots in her story and in doing so makes it even weaker.
                            Yeah, this bugs the crap out of me too. Like, apparently she’s said that Dumbledore knew Gilderoy Lockheart was a fraud, but hired him anyway to expose him, with some bologna excuse about there being a lot you can learn from a poor teacher about what not to do and how not to be.

                            And don’t get me started on Ilvermorny. If you wanted to write about wizardry in America, great, but don’t make the most prominent American magic school a carbon copy of Hogwarts. Like, it’s even acknowledged as a Hogwarts ripoff in canon: the founders went to Hogwarts and liked it so much they decided to base their own school around it.

                            And come on, you already hinted at the existence of the Salem Witches’ Academy in Goblet of Fire. Words cannot describe how much more interesting that concept is than “Hogwarts again, but the houses are based on Native American mythical creatures this time.”


                            Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                            My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                            Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Heavy Arms View Post
                              But to an extent (and I don't mean this to be antagonistic to Wil's point) I don't like the "natural conclusion" thing. Really big fictional settings like the Potterverse don't have a natural conclusion. Harry's particular part in it does.
                              No antagonism taken. On the contrary, that is an excellent point, and I agree. I would be perfectly happy with more stories within that universe, provided they were their own stories instead of awkward addenda to Harry’s story. With this in mind, I would refine my point to say that stories should end when they are over, but that the worlds those stories take place in can still be great settings for other stories.


                              Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                              My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                              Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
                                “I understand that what I’m doing is bad, and has its roots in a lot of really horrible stereotypes that continue to hurt real people today. But I want to do it in my art anyway, because I think it’s hot!”
                                Is this in reference to something specific?

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X