Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

You Know What I Hate MK I

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • cerealkiller
    started a topic You Know What I Hate MK I

    You Know What I Hate MK I

    Heartburn. I love chili but this is an evil and HELL I wish upon no one.

  • nofather
    replied
    Tariffs are just a little bit of it, mostly it's poor crops this past year in California and Mexico, where most of the world's avocados come from. That plus increased demand (it's a superfood!) means higher prices if places sell it at all.

    As someone who's only recently (the past few years) had and came to love guacamole I'm annoyed at the situation as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dwight
    replied
    $3 for a side of mole sauce? Did we loose a war? Did tariffs get placed on it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by lnodiv View Post
    You have a habit of putting things into words that cut right to the point of the issues without alienating anyone, and I really appreciate that.
    Thank you, that’s very kind of you to say.

    Leave a comment:


  • lnodiv
    replied
    Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
    As bogus as the concept of race may be, it would be irresponsible to ignore it
    You have a habit of putting things into words that cut right to the point of the issues without alienating anyone, and I really appreciate that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    Originally posted by Kammerer View Post
    Ethnicity is real. And it's not the same as "race". Being "white" means nothing. You might be German, you might be Moldovan, you might be White American or Jewish. And all of these are not very similar. Being a Black American is much closer to being White American than it is to being Nigerian. I get why a racially diverse country like the USA developed this meme classification of people, but it rustles my jimmies nevertheless. Didn't mean to start a big debate - just wanted to vent a little.
    Here’s the thing, though. As bogus as the concept of race may be, it would be irresponsible to ignore it, because of the way our sociopolitical systems are stacked in favor of white folks. Until and unless we can fix the systemic issues that do real harm to people based on these made-up categories, we can’t discard those categories. That’s why I say race isn’t real but it does matter. Rolling with the astrology metaphor, if the police unfairly targeted Scorpios, it would be irresponsible to ignore that correlation, even though the categorization system is inane.

    Leave a comment:


  • lnodiv
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    Let me put it this way - if scientists were to have found a correlation between birthdate and the suicide rate, would that make astrology valid?
    If the correlation was as strong as the ones we're talking about (eg Pisces being 10x more likely to commit suicide than the general population) - it would make ignoring birth date grossly irresponsible for those in a position to:

    1) Evaluate mental health services for new patients with no established history
    2) Decide how to allocate funding for mental health services across an organization
    3) Decide how to allocate funding for research into mental health issues

    The fact is that 'race', regardless of being a social construct, can be a useful canary for actual useful information. People don't tend to walk into a health service provider with a highly detailed map of their genetic history, and most people in the United States have absolutely no real idea where their heritage lies once you go back further than a generation or two. Race can be a useful indicator for identifying at-risk populations, and the fact that this is even a debate is ludicrous.

    I'm not saying it makes the idea of race 'real' or 'valid', because frankly those are philosophical questions.
    I'm just saying there are situations where it's useful and where ignoring it can lead to actual harm specifically to those groups racism already harms most in healthcare.
    Last edited by lnodiv; 11-08-2019, 11:01 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Let me put it this way - if scientists were to have found a correlation between birthdate and the suicide rate, would that make astrology valid?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kammerer
    replied
    Ethnicity is real. And it's not the same as "race". Being "white" means nothing. You might be German, you might be Moldovan, you might be White American or Jewish. And all of these are not very similar. Being a Black American is much closer to being White American than it is to being Nigerian. I get why a racially diverse country like the USA developed this meme classification of people, but it rustles my jimmies nevertheless. Didn't mean to start a big debate - just wanted to vent a little.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by lnodiv View Post
    I mean, if you're going to say that 'race' is literally nothing but the genes informing your skin color, sure.
    It’s not even that much. Like I was saying, race is a social construct that only passes as scientific classification when people don’t think about it very hard. Where’s the science in pushing a pencil through a person’s hair to assess how black they are?

    Your race isn’t why you have Tay-Sachs - your genes are.
    Last edited by TheCountAlucard; 11-08-2019, 04:04 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • lnodiv
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    Not quite.
    I mean, if you're going to say that 'race' is literally nothing but the genes informing your skin color, sure.

    There's no tie between skin color genetics specifically and conditions such as Tay-Sachs disease. Various ethnic groups do have genetic predispositions to some diseases. One in thirteen black people in the United States are born with the sickle cell trait - which, incidentally, isn't the result of any sort of genocide afaik, but because it's been naturally selected for due to the resistance that trait gives to infection by malaria - vs less than one percent of the overall population of the country.

    Racism is already a massive contributor to inequality of health outcomes, while swinging too hard in the other direction and ignoring these real and significant dangers in the name of pretending race doesn't matter can, will, and has done significant damage to those suffering from them. If an ethnic group has ten times the risk of inheriting a genetic disorder, we shouldn't discount that.

    Let me reiterate here: Being black doesn't give you sickle cell trait. The two things are not connected at a causal level. They are, however, highly correlated because the people in the United States most likely to possess genetic heritage predisposing them to sickle cell anemia are also the people most likely to be black. The relationship isn't causal, but, despite the consistent screeching of second-year stats students, causation is not required for predictive value. That predictive value is why race can be a clinically significant risk factor, despite not being part of a causal relationship.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charlaquin
    replied
    I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Most of us were taught that race is real but it doesn’t matter, when the truth is exactly the opposite. Race is not real, but it does matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by lnodiv View Post
    Race is actually a clinically significant risk factor for a number of health issues, for what it's worth. See: sickle cell disease.
    Not quite. I’ll explain more when I get some time if someone else doesn’t debunk this by then.

    EDIT: Now, it’s true that certain ethnic groups that experienced a genetic bottleneck at some point in their history, often due to a genocide, are more prone to have the recessive traits that lead to health problems, and that those groups are said to belong to one “race” or another. But that’s an instance of the tail wagging the dog; race isn’t causing people’s genes to express risk factors, because “race” as most people understand it is not founded in reality.

    EDIT: I mean, shit, when my granddad was a kid, the Irish and Italians weren’t considered “white.”
    Last edited by TheCountAlucard; 11-08-2019, 01:35 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • lnodiv
    replied
    Originally posted by Kammerer View Post
    Americans saying "white", "black", "asian", etc. like race is scientifically real and sharing a skin color with someone makes us meaningfully similar.
    Race is actually a clinically significant risk factor for a number of health issues, for what it's worth. See: sickle cell disease.

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    So, the Big Dumb Fuckwit's gone and done something truly awful, but so far it's flown under the radar of the news organizations. I'm mad about the thing itself, but I'm also mad about its lack of coverage.

    I'm sure most of you are aware, but I'll reiterate for those of you unfamiliar with it, that wolves actually went extinct in the U.S. during the 1970's, and it's taken generations of concerted effort by conservationists to bring their numbers back up.

    ​Now, the very year their numbers were sufficient to take them off the endangered species list, Donald Trump put a piece of paper through that gives anyone, licensed or no, permission to kill as many wolves as they want, using pretty much any means they want: from leaving inhumane razor-wire traps everywhere, to lobbing a live hand grenade into their dens to blow up their cubs while they sleep, to using the tracking collars conservationists put on them to get their exact location.

    And the news is covering none of it.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X