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  • I love pepperoni rolls, especially when served with Pepsi.

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    • Nice.



      I'll admit to being a little surprised, just due to the massive changes and ramifications. But while she didn't answer immediately the arc after Bruce popped the question involved him telling her a story while they lounged around his bedroom in their underwear. Which would be a weird way to celebrate saying no.

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      • I love the OSR (Old-School Revival) movement in RPG's. It's a great way to keep the old-school D&D play style alive, and there is a wealth of creative content within the OSR as well. The best part is that most of it can be legally downloaded for free since it's mostly open-license material.

        I have PDF's of several OSR games, including Full Metal Plate Mail (Original D&D, AKA Zero Edition), Basic Fantasy (A heavily modernized version of B/X), and Dark Dungeons (BECMI/Rules Cyclopedia) and they are all awesome. I even purchased softcover hard copies of Basic Fantasy and Dark Dungeons because of how impressed I was with them.

        I would get OSRIC and For Glory & Gold, but I already own the actual corebooks of AD&D 1e and 2e (they used to belong to my Dad before he gave them to me).

        I like the sandbox style of play that is the generally assumed default playstyle in most OSR games. I even apply the "Old-School" line of thinking to my World of Darkness and Big Eyes Small Mouth games. I find the Old-School style a preferable alternative to the "Story Game" movement. While Story Games have their own merits and some of them are quite good, they're just not my cup of tea overall.

        Key hallmarks of Old-School play include Sandbox-style campaigns, Role-Playing over Roll-Playing, and GM rulings over a plethora of specified rules.

        I've been wanting to run a Vampire: The Masquerade 1E play-by-post in the Old-School sandbox style for a while. My Friday one-shot at my school's Gaming Club went quite well (though it was a little short) and now I'm really wanting to run more games.

        While many in the OSR consider Masquerade 1E to be the beginning of the "New School", I consider it to be one of the last "Old School" games, as Mark Rein-Hagen was heavily influenced by Old-School games like Original Dungeons & Dragons (1974) and Call of Cthulhu (1981), giving credit to both in the acknowledgements in the back of the 1e Corebook, right up there with Anne Rice, Near Dark, and The Lost Boys.

        I love the creativity, simplicity, and freedom within the OSR movement and the OSR style of play. I do like other gaming styles as well, but there's a soft spot in me for Old-School RPG adventuring. Even if I am part of the "New School" generation (My first RPG was D&D 3.5 and I was born in 1993).

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        • As the ideological polar opposite to the post above, I can’t begin to articulate how much I adore the Powered by the Apocalypse movement in games. They hit the perfect mechanical point for me, where the rules rarely come into play save for when it’s interesting and dramatic, leaving most of the time aside for collaborative improvisation. It empowers players to take a lot of power over the narrative and makes the role of GM incredibly easy, focused on responses to players rather than pre-planning and railroading. Apocalypse World itself is a treat, but games like Monsterhearts, Night Witches, Legacy, and Masks are all just fantastic, and special mention goes to Bluebeard’s Bride for being a horrifying emotional nightmare that I’m too scared to ever actually play.

          I came to this hobby to tell stories together, and have had to fight against rulesets trying to get in the way of that for over a decade now. I love love love it.

          (Hot take: Dungeon World isn’t a good PbtA game, and I’d argue not a good game in general.)


          Just call me Lex.

          Female pronouns for me, please.

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          • Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
            As the ideological polar opposite to the post above, I can’t begin to articulate how much I adore the Powered by the Apocalypse movement in games. They hit the perfect mechanical point for me, where the rules rarely come into play save for when it’s interesting and dramatic, leaving most of the time aside for collaborative improvisation. It empowers players to take a lot of power over the narrative and makes the role of GM incredibly easy, focused on responses to players rather than pre-planning and railroading. Apocalypse World itself is a treat, but games like Monsterhearts, Night Witches, Legacy, and Masks are all just fantastic, and special mention goes to Bluebeard’s Bride for being a horrifying emotional nightmare that I’m too scared to ever actually play.

            I came to this hobby to tell stories together, and have had to fight against rulesets trying to get in the way of that for over a decade now. I love love love it.

            (Hot take: Dungeon World isn’t a good PbtA game, and I’d argue not a good game in general.)

            The only Story Game I have any familiarity with is Dungeon World. I haven't checked Monsterhearts, but I have heard good things about it. I might check it out and see how it works.

            But there is nothing that says you can't like both the OSR and Story Games. I have limited familiarity with Story Games while I am quite familiar with the OSR and even intend to make my own OSR game one day. So, I might check out some more Story Games and see how they hold up and maybe even mine a few ideas from them if I like the ideas presented.

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            • Originally posted by Camilla View Post
              But there is nothing that says you can't like both the OSR and Story Games.
              In fact, for some folks a large part of the draw of these new-fangled "story games" is that the playing of them feels a whole lot like playing the old-school games of our youth did. Back when we "didn't know better" and ran primarily via story and imagination with as little rules as possible just because there were so many rules that it was easier to ignore all but the bare-bones of the system to keep the game moving (rather than keep the pages of the rule-books flipping).


              Not so noble anymore.

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              • Originally posted by Camilla View Post
                Key hallmarks of Old-School play include Sandbox-style campaigns, Role-Playing over Roll-Playing, and GM rulings over a plethora of specified rules.
                I've got nothing against OSR, but these things are definitely not the hallmarks of old school gaming. Maybe OSR has embraced these ideals and attempted to bring them into otherwise old-school games, I don't know cause I haven't really played them, but they are not old-school ideals.

                GM rulings over a plethora of specified rules? Have you read 1e or 2e (A)D&D? There are so many different subsystems for resolving actions, and all of them completely arbitrary. Do you hit with an attack? Subtract the target’s AC from your THAC0 and then try to roll that number on a d20. Do you find a secret door? Roll a d6: on a 1, you found it. Saving throw? Roll a d20 and compare the result to a fixed number for one of five categories based on your class. Does the NPC turn hostile? The GM will roll 2d6 and compare the result to a reaction table, applying a modifier from your Charisma. Can you break that door open? Roll a d20 and try to roll under a number based on your strength. Snap a chain? Roll percentile dice. And so on. That meant if a player wanted to attempt an action that wasn't codified by one of these subsystems, the DM either had to pick one that they arbitrarily decided was closest, make up a new subsystem for it from whole cloth, or just decide on a result without any mechanical resolution. It wasn't until 3e that all the various resolution mechanics were scrapped in favor of a single, universal mechanic. If the outcome of your action was uncertain, you'd roll a d20, add/subtract modifiers, and try to roll a higher total than the difficulty of the task, no matter what the task was. That gave DMs WAY more power to adjudicate actions because instead of inventing a whole mechanic, they could just determine a DC and ask for an ability or skill check.

                The reason "Adjudication over a plethora of specified rules" SEEMS old-school is because many people who got into the hobby in the 1e and 2e days were fairly young at the time and just ignored the plethora of specified rules that did exist and just made it up as they went using the absolute minimum possible of the overcomplicated system.

                As for sandbox style play, old-school D&D was much more focused on dungeon crawls; in many ways the opposite of a sandbox. Personally I think the sandbox/railroad dichotomy is a toxic way of categorizing campaigns, serving to belittle one category and idealize the other, while being nearly useless for actually analyzing campaign structure. But, dungeon delves are generally one of the most structured types of adventure, while hex crawls are generally the least structured, and the latter didn't really become a thing until Isle of Dread.

                Don't even get me started on "role-playing vs roll-playing". Talk about your toxic dichotomies in RPG discussions. I suppose you could say that this way of looking at gaming is rather prevalent in players who mythologize old-school RPGs, so in that sense I guess you're not wrong.
                Last edited by Charlaquin; 10-09-2017, 01:02 PM.


                Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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                • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                  I've got nothing against OSR, but these things are definitely not the hallmarks of old school gaming. Maybe OSR has embraced these ideals and attempted to bring them into otherwise old-school games, I don't know cause I haven't really played them, but they are not old-school ideals.

                  GM rulings over a plethora of specified rules? Have you read 1e or 2e (A)D&D? There are so many different subsystems for resolving actions, and all of them completely arbitrary. Do you hit with an attack? Subtract the target’s AC from your THAC0 and then try to roll that number on a d20. Do you find a secret door? Roll a d6: on a 1, you found it. Saving throw? Roll a d20 and compare the result to a fixed number for one of five categories based on your class. Does the NPC turn hostile? The GM will roll 2d6 and compare the result to a reaction table, applying a modifier from your Charisma. Can you break that door open? Roll a d20 and try to roll under a number based on your strength. Snap a chain? Roll percentile dice. And so on. That meant if a player wanted to attempt an action that wasn't codified by one of these subsystems, the DM either had to pick one that they arbitrarily decided was closest, make up a new subsystem for it from whole cloth, or just decide on a result without any mechanical resolution. It wasn't until 3e that all the various resolution mechanics were scrapped in favor of a single, universal mechanic. If the outcome of your action was uncertain, you'd roll a d20, add/subtract modifiers, and try to roll a higher total than the difficulty of the task, no matter what the task was. That gave DMs WAY more power to adjudicate actions because instead of inventing a whole mechanic, they could just determine a DC and ask for an ability or skill check.

                  The reason "Adjudication over a plethora of specified rules" SEEMS old-school is because many people who got into the hobby in the 1e and 2e days were fairly young at the time and just ignored the plethora of specified rules that did exist and just made it up as they went using the absolute minimum possible of the overcomplicated system.

                  As for sandbox style play, old-school D&D was much more focused on dungeon crawls; in many ways the opposite of a sandbox. Personally I think the sandbox/railroad dichotomy is a toxic way of categorizing campaigns, serving to belittle one category and idealize the other, while being nearly useless for actually analyzing campaign structure. But, dungeon delves are generally one of the most structured types of adventure, while hex crawls are generally the least structured, and the latter didn't really become a thing until Isle of Dread.

                  Don't even get me started on "role-playing vs roll-playing". Talk about your toxic dichotomies in RPG discussions. I suppose you could say that this way of looking at gaming is rather prevalent in players who mythologize old-school RPGs, so in that sense I guess you're not wrong.

                  Fair point, AD&D did have a TON of extra rules. Which is most likely why the modern OSR movement tends to focus on the lighter systems of OD&D and Basic D&D more often these days. Although wilderness hex-crawling was a big thing in OD&D and Basic, it was not so much a thing that was emphasized in Advanced. The assumption in OD&D was that early on, you'd go dungeon-crawling for treasure and then trek the wilderness before finally leveling up enough to build a stronghold or a domain.

                  OD&D even recommended using the board from "Outdoor Survival" solely for the purpose of hex-crawling.

                  I wasn't trying to cause any toxic dichotomies, I was just noting things I like about the modern OSR movement and why I am drawn to it.
                  Last edited by Camilla; 10-09-2017, 01:20 PM.

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                  • Originally posted by Camilla View Post
                    Fair point, AD&D did have a TON of extra rules. Which is most likely why the modern OSR movement tends to focus on the lighter systems of OD&D and Basic D&D more often these days. Although wilderness hex-crawling was a big thing in OD&D and Basic, it was not so much a thing that was emphasized in Advanced. The assumption in OD&D was that early on, you'd go dungeon-crawling for treasure and then trek the wilderness before finally leveling up enough to build a stronghold or a domain.

                    OD&D even recommended using the board from "Outdoor Survival" solely for the purpose of hex-crawling.
                    Makes sense. I have less knowledge of OD&D and BD&D.

                    Originally posted by Camilla View Post
                    I wasn't trying to cause any toxic dichotomies, I was just noting things I like about the modern OSR movement and why I am drawn to it.
                    Oh, for sure. I didn't mean to accuse you of being toxic, though in hindsight that is exactly what it looks like I was doing. Sorry for that. Those particular phrases are pet peeves of mine and I shouldn't let them set me off as much as I do.


                    Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                    My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                    Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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                    • Originally posted by Charlaquin View Post
                      Makes sense. I have less knowledge of OD&D and BD&D.


                      Oh, for sure. I didn't mean to accuse you of being toxic, though in hindsight that is exactly what it looks like I was doing. Sorry for that. Those particular phrases are pet peeves of mine and I shouldn't let them set me off as much as I do.

                      It's alright. Yeah, I love OD&D and BD&D a lot, although AD&D, 5e, and 3.5/Pathfinder are also good too. But there is a certain unpolished charm to the more stripped-down Early Installment Weirdness of OD&D.

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                      • Originally posted by nofather View Post
                        I hate that Hasbro has this huge universe crossover thing in the comics in IDW and it really has scattered GI Joe to the four winds.
                        I feel an urge to say 'finally' but it hasn't been much over a month since my complaint. And things are finally coming together and it looks like it's gonna be good. There's a new Cobra Commander.



                        Right, she's wearing a mask. It's the Baroness.

                        Definitely the most qualified for the job, as she's always been loyal to the cause while not being overwhelmed by zealotry.

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                        • I love cooking.

                          I'd been in a really terrible place emotionally, mentally, and physically, and I was having trouble coming up with any way to shake myself free of it. So I thought long and hard about what things I used to do that I haven't been doing lately, and realized that it had been a very long time since the last time I prepared a meal for anyone other than making myself the quickest of lunches on the rare days that I managed to stay awake long enough to get hungry.

                          So I made a resolution that there would no longer be take-out and fast food getting picked up just because it is "easier", and I would put myself on the hook as responsible for making sure there are groceries in the house and preparing meals. I was expecting it to feel like self-torture at first and eventually pay off, because I suffer from fibromyalgia and bipolar depression so I often feel like I hurt too much to do something or like I would rather just waste away... but the pay-off has come early, and I am very happy about it.

                          I haven't had a bought-in meal since last weekend, and despite a notable increase in aches I haven't felt like I don't have it in me to get back in the kitchen and get something put together - there is really something special to me about putting together a dish, even something simple like a grilled cheese sandwich and a canned soup, and seeing people enjoy it. It makes me feel like I'm doing something that matters.


                          Not so noble anymore.

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                          • I love Vampire: The Requiem 1e, even with its flaws. I am currently outlining ideas for a Requiem fanfiction right now.

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                            • Originally posted by Camilla View Post
                              I love Vampire: The Requiem 1e, even with its flaws. I am currently outlining ideas for a Requiem fanfiction right now.
                              I almost regret asking this, but what’s your issue with 2e? The fluff is the same save for the Fog of Ages.


                              Just call me Lex.

                              Female pronouns for me, please.

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                              • Originally posted by atamajakki View Post

                                I almost regret asking this, but what’s your issue with 2e? The fluff is the same save for the Fog of Ages.
                                Just an unofficial, non-red text suggestion - this might be a conversation best held over private messages, what with the subject being one that Camilla has gotten into trouble over in the past.


                                Onyx Path Forum Moderator

                                My mod voice is red. I use it so you know when I'm speaking in an official capacity, not as an indication of tone.

                                Going by Willow now, or Wil for short. She/Her/Hers.

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