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The Triumphant return of the "Lets Talk Food" Thread

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  • The Triumphant return of the "Lets Talk Food" Thread

    Wherein we speak of food, condiments, recipes and our experiences thereof.


    I haven't been making anything of interest lately, so I leave it to the rest of you maniacs. Enjoy.


    Duly Elected Guild Hierarch of the Onyx Path Forums

    http://northernfoxgames.com/

  • #2
    All I've been doing lately is trying to adapt a recipe or several. See my GF and her brother live with me, and one of those quirks of genetics and family lines is that they can't handle salt very well (amusingly I can't handle black pepper) and for one reason and another they also don't do terribly well with rich foods.

    One of my signature simple dishes is a garlic-butter parmesan chicken. See I take some chicken breasts, put them in a pyrex baking dish, sprinkle montreal chicken spice and garlic, drop in a stick of butter and then layer on some parmesan cheese and bake the whole thing. Takes almost no prep time, can be done with even frozen chicken, and tastes good. With the small drawback that between butter saturated chicken and the cheese, it's a very rich foodstuff. So far I've tried eliminating the butter, and it helped... but not enough. Next time I'm going to return baking it in butter and take away the cheese.


    Odd_Canuck is not a topical medication or food product and is not to be taken internally or seriously.

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    • #3
      The last culinary experiment I conducted has been cataloged in the Hate thread, and is in reference to that Christless Oscar Meyer summer sausage, which in retrospect really was my own fault for not seeing that coming.

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      • #4
        I mainly use the slow cooker, especially if I am making beef tips. Stew meat, one envelope of onion and mushroom soup mix, half stick of butter (original recipe called for a whole stick). Spray the crockpot with Pam, coating the sides. Put in the butter, dump in the meat and sprinkle the soup mix on the meat. Set on high for 4 to 6 hours (It usually cooks up within 2.5 to 3 hours). Cook egg noodles as described on package and mix in the meat. For variety, add alfredo sauce or sour cream. Salt and pepper to taste.

        Another one....boneless beef ribs in the slow cooker. Spray the pot, place meat in pot. Use your favorite BBQ sauce, cover to coat. Cook at 4 to 6 hours on high, check at 3 hours for tenderness. When tender, take out CAREFULLY, serve with usual BBQ sides (potato salad, cole slaw, pinto beans)


        Bipolar vampire...can't decide to feast for fun or for rage...

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        • #5
          I've been making a lot of soups and chilis lately, because it's winter. So uhh....recipes. Well, here is a super basic potato leek soup recipe. It is super starchy and filling and thick and warm:

          Ingredients:
          Olive Oil
          Butter (optional)
          2-3 Onions (depending on size), diced
          6 cloves of garlic, diced or pressed
          2-4 lbs of potatoes (I've used russets and white or yellow potatoes, not sure it would work with reds), peeled and cubed
          1-2 Leeks (depending on size) quartered and chopped into roughly 1-inch sections*
          Chicken broth (about two cartons, eight cups if you're cooler than me and are making your own)(Also, you can sub vegetable broth if you're veg*n but it really tastes better with chicken and I am an awful carnivore, so...)
          Salt
          Pepper
          Cheddar (optional, topping)
          Sour Cream (optional, topping)

          -Coat the bottom of a very large, deep skillet or saucepan in oil (I use my huge-ass sautee pan, but really it's just important to have enough surface area to cook the onions), and sautee the onions and garlic over medium-high heat until they start to turn brown around the edges

          -Add the potatoes, toss them a bit, and then add enough broth to cover them. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce to medium-low and simmer, stirring occasionally until the potatoes start to get soft (test this by pressing a piece of potato against the side of your pot/pan with whatever you're using to stir. If it disintegrates with very little resistance, you're there).

          -While the potatoes are simmering, sautee the leeks in butter (or oil) in a separate skillet over medium heat until they get soft

          -When the leeks and potatoes are both soft, add the leeks to the broth and then blend to a creamy consistency with either an immersion (stick) blender, or by ladling the entire thing into a stand blender (possibly in shifts, depending on how big your blender is and how much soup you're making)

          -Optionally, if you want the soup to remain somewhat chunky, separate about half the soup before you add the leeks, then add the leeks to only one half, blending that half before combining it back with the unblended half. If you're going this route, you probably want to make sure that your potatoes were chopped into smaller-than-usual pieces back at the beginning so you're not getting huge mouthfuls of unblended potato.


          -Salt and Pepper to taste, serve with cheddar and sour cream (and bacon bits, and chives, and really whatever the fuck you think would be good. A swirl of balsamic probably isn't an awful idea. If you'd consider putting it on a baked potato, it probably works well here, as do a few other things besides. Maybe throw some butter in. Whatever.)

          *if you're not used to leeks, basically you first want to cut off and discard all the really dark green parts of the leaves, saving as much of the light-green and white parts as possible. You probably want to go leaf-by-leaf with a pair of scissors, because it will change from light to dark at a different point on each leaf. Once that's done, you should have something that resembles a tube. Cut the bottom half-inch of the tube off (the bit with the roots) and discard. Then cut lengthwise along the tube, splitting it in half, then set the two halves flat-side-down and cut lengthwise again, so you've got quarters. Then cut width-wise along those quarters until you've divided them into 1-inch sections. Then throw your 1-inch sections into a strainer, take them to the sink, and rinse the fuck out of them. A lot of dirt gets between the leaves of leeks, and it's pretty much impossible to wash all of it out until after you've cut them up.
          Last edited by Gabby; 01-11-2014, 04:02 PM.

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          • #6
            Decided to make a sandwich. Spicy chicken breast, lettuce, tomato, Miracle Whip, and just because I wanted to see what would happen, I fried up about an egg's worth of Egg Beaters and put it in there. I can't tell that it affected the flavor, but it did weird yet interesting things to the consistency.

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            • #7
              Used some Canned Tomato sauce on a pizza last night. It was a good choice, the sauce and the pepperoni was pleasantly spicy.


              Duly Elected Guild Hierarch of the Onyx Path Forums

              http://northernfoxgames.com/

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              • #8
                Sooner or later this week, I will be making pizza sliders: sliced garlic bread decorated with pizza sauce, mozzarella, and, I don't know, let's say pepperoni.

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                • #9
                  This evening, my brother made for me this absolutely delicious chicken dish consisting of red onions, red pesto, red grapes, sun-dried tomatoes, cooked in red wine. Probably the most technically sophisticated dish he's ever prepared, with a rich juxtaposition of complementary flavours. The grapes were particularly pleasing, helping to bring out the real flavour in the sauce. It was also very aesthetically pleasant; the cooking died the outer surface of the chicken breast a nice deep purple hue (that kind of resembled the grey of tender fish portions), and also toughened it up some giving the impression and texture of a nice casing, and it also made the inner meat look even whiter by contrast once you cut into it.


                  I have approximate knowledge of many things.
                  Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
                  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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                  • #10
                    I made chilli using ground buffalo the other day. Used chipotle Tobasco sauce to give it heat and a nice smokey flavor.

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                    • #11
                      I quite like chipotle Tabasco sauce. Really it's the only Tabasco that I like.

                      Edit: And buffalo is always delicious.


                      "For these reasons, the trade of a soldier is held the most honourable of all others; because a soldier is a Yahoo hired to kill, in cold blood, as many of his own species, who have never offended him, as possibly he can." ― from "Gulliver's Travels"

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                      • #12
                        Never tried buffalo, is it like something I may have a frame of reference for, like ox?


                        I'm So Meta Even This Acronym

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                        • #13
                          Flavor and cooking wise, Buffalo is close to Very Lean beef (like 90/10 or even 95/5 lean ground beef) with just a little bit of that 'Gamey' flavor that you get with things like Elk.
                          If you're cooking Buffalo (steaks, ground chuck, whaterver) for people who eat things like Venison, Elk, or Mutton, they'll probably love it just fine. If you're cooking it for people who only ever eat the main stream farm raised meats (chicken, pork, Beef) it may not go over well.

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                          • #14
                            He tasted about as good as he looks :P

                            http://s1065.photobucket.com/user/Si...tml?sort=3&o=1


                            Though in the hindsight i should have stewed instead of roasted the meat.

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                            • #15
                              Never tried either Venison, Elk or Mutton, there are not those things around here but I'm willing to try them or buffalo if I get the chance.


                              I'm So Meta Even This Acronym

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