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  • #16
    Anyone else going to see the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special in theaters?


    The Forum Member Also Known as "Mike Holland"

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    • #17
      Originally posted by JimB View Post
      Idris Elba is the king of all badasses. He sits on a throne made of gold mined from meteorites that he personally caught in his fists as they fell to the Earth, and the throne is also a motorcycle. His crown is made of equal parts fire and electric guitar riffs.
      A while ago, it occurred to me that Idris Elba's big climactic speech in Pacific Rim is being given mostly to people who are going to wind up staying back at the base and awaiting the results of the final mission, so it's less of a "inspire you all to give 110% before we go into battle" moment and more of "I'm going off to die now; here's something to remember how awesome I was".

      I have no problem with this.


      I have approximate knowledge of many things.
      Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
      https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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      • #18
        For me, while greater plot coherency and character investment would be nice, I was primarily looking to Thor: The Dark World for scope and mythology, which it had in droves. And maybe a bit of giving some of the side characters more to do, which it did well enough (even if one of them got something cool to do right before some complete bullshit, but whatever). I am satisfied by it to the degree that I would greatly enjoy watching it again, though taking on the criticisms of others shall give me heightened standards for the next one.


        I have approximate knowledge of many things.
        Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
        https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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        • #19
          Did anyone think that Jaime Alexander (Sif) had this "Wonder Woman" vibe going for her?


          Mankind was once an endangered species. It will likely be so again. And mankind will only have itself to blame.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Shadowflame View Post
            Did anyone think that Jaime Alexander (Sif) had this "Wonder Woman" vibe going for her?
            I would totally support her as Wonder Woman, though the costume might need to be adjusted to include sleeves.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Loxosceles

              If you think that the Marvel Comics science fiction spin on Asgardians is stupid, the people to take it up with are Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.

              Just hop onto your non-science-fiction time machine, head back to 1962 and let them know how dumb they are before they sit down to produce Journey Into Mystery #83, when he fights aliens. Definitely get to them before Journey Into Mystery #85, when Loki appears and Thor gets really irresponsible by using Mjolnir to produce anti-matter on the streets of Manhattan.

              The point being; the departure from the mysticism is inherent in the character, as written by Marvel comics. The times when it has returned fully to the mysticism, and actually cut out the science fiction (rather than combining the two) are the rare events. It is a naive criticism to say, "Thor the movie should not have sci-fi, it should be more like the comics." because those sci-fi elements are inherent in those comic books.
              thor was always science fiction? In his origins i mean. i always thought that he was a mystic hero in a world with both mystic and science fiction and that the mix of the two as a integral of thor have come recently. Meaning that in the old comic his powers were magic based exclusively and that the notion of asgardians being a advance scientific civilization was something new.

              However it is in the comics, it pretty ambigous now. Fear itself went with the movie angle a lot but mysticism is a core part of the character. And while i could buy later revision of the character to go more in accordance with the movie it still leaves the issue of the other gods who are all magic based (the greek ones, with hercules)
              Last edited by kaho; 11-10-2013, 05:55 PM.


              Rule number 1
              Assume players are bastards, bastard coated bastards with bastard filling until proven otherwise.
              Rule number 2
              I don't care about the theme of personal horror.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by kaho View Post

                thor was always science fiction? In his origins i mean. i always thought that he was a mystic hero in a world with both mystic and science fiction and that the mix of the two as a integral of thor have come recently. Meaning that in the old comic his powers were magic based exclusively and that the notion of asgardians being a advance scientific civilization was something new.

                However it is in the comics, it pretty ambigous now. Fear itself went with the movie angle a lot but mysticism is a core part of the character. And while i could buy later revision of the character to go more in accordance with the movie it still leaves the issue of the other gods who are all magic based (the greek ones, with hercules)
                The consensus from the convention I was at last year was that the movies are going with the Superman idea of a alien superhero, while the comics remain strictly mystic. (There's this enchantment on that hammer see?) When Captain America had been assassinated Thor summoned his ghost to ask if he wanted to be avenged. And then in the Ultimates during an alien invasion, that version of Thor summons the einherjar (dead heroes)...initially the Avengers thought him a madman...after doing that, there was a crisis of faith.
                Which segues nicely into the reason that was explained to me why Disney doesn't want the God in Thunder-God; controversy. They don't want to see such characters as the Crusader which attacked Thor because of his religious beliefs. They don't want to see Thor threaten the nation with a biblical deluge as he once did when he became pissed at Iron Man and SHIELD. It's a whole lot safer (and profitable) if the movie version of Thor gets nice and neutered and plays nice with everyone else. Especially the federal government.
                Last edited by Shadowflame; 11-10-2013, 07:08 PM.


                Mankind was once an endangered species. It will likely be so again. And mankind will only have itself to blame.

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                • #23
                  I just watched a movie called Glengarry Glen Ross, adapted from a play by David Mamet.

                  It's... wow.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kZg_ALxEz0

                  The scene is the opening of the movie, and... all I can think of is that I should check out more stuff from Mamet.


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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Prometheus878 View Post
                    I just watched a movie called Glengarry Glen Ross, adapted from a play by David Mamet.

                    It's... wow.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8kZg_ALxEz0

                    The scene is the opening of the movie, and... all I can think of is that I should check out more stuff from Mamet.
                    Pretty impressive, yeah? IMO, the movie definitely deserves its acclaim. There is one thing that bothers me about the movie, though - or more accurately, about its reception. See, Alec Baldwin's speech at the beginning is definitely the most memorable moment in the film...but I don't think many people take it into account that his character is emphatically not a good guy.

                    You're not supposed to listen to that speech and come away thinking that yeah, that was awesome, just the kick-in-the-ass those guys needed to really make some sales. But I can't tell you how many people I've talked to who accepted it at face value. Sorta like how so many people watch Fight Club and come away with the idea that Tyler Durden was a generally awesome dude instead of a nihilistic psychopath.

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                    • #25
                      I've never really understood the difference between magic and science as aesthetics in fiction anyway. I mean, honestly, what's the difference between a ray gun and a wand that shoots beams of fire? Between riding a dragon and flying an X-wing? Between a magic ring of power that's linked to an evil wizard's soul or a doomsday weapon that emits EM radiation the evil scientist can track with his equipment? Or, to borrow an example from the movie itself, between a soulforge and a quantum mechanic whatsit?

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                      • #26
                        I think it's what I call the "drill sergeant" effect. The drill sergeant is hurling abuse at you, sure, but he lets you know right off the bat that real combat is a thousand times worse than anything he can throw at you, and he genuinely wants you to improve, to be prepared for what is to come. His job is to make you better, so you take the abuse as the challenge it is rather than an insult.

                        Mitchell & Murray obviously wanted Baldwin's character to do the drill sergeant deal, but the character made no bones about the fact that he thought the salesmen were a complete waste of space, so the other characters took his "pep talk" for the insulting abuse it was.

                        So yeah. Corporate America. Not that Communist Russia was any better.

                        (PS: Have you noticed how things involving money usually gradually turn into nightmarish garbage in one way or another? That's what I've taken away from my understanding of economic history.)


                        Mouse monk riding a tiny pig avatar courtesy of the very talented forumite Jen!

                        Jen's original portrayal of Mouse Monk, featuring some human or other named Tybalt Farwander.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Prometheus878 View Post
                          I think it's what I call the "drill sergeant" effect. The drill sergeant is hurling abuse at you, sure, but he lets you know right off the bat that real combat is a thousand times worse than anything he can throw at you, and he genuinely wants you to improve, to be prepared for what is to come. His job is to make you better, so you take the abuse as the challenge it is rather than an insult.

                          Mitchell & Murray obviously wanted Baldwin's character to do the drill sergeant deal, but the character made no bones about the fact that he thought the salesmen were a complete waste of space, so the other characters took his "pep talk" for the insulting abuse it was.

                          So yeah. Corporate America. Not that Communist Russia was any better.
                          Mhm, I think the drill-sergeant precedent is why Baldwin's speech caught on with people as much as it did. It's just surprising within the context of the film - i.e., the illegal and unethical acts the characters commit in desperation - that people can still look at the story and think that yes, the harsh always-be-closing mindset is absolutely the right one.

                          I'm a bit biased, though. Always hated dealing with that kind of authority figure in real life. Accordingly, that scene in Full Metal Jacket where Private Pyle takes revenge on Hartman is one of my favorites in cinema.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Shadowflame View Post

                            The consensus from the convention I was at last year was that the movies are going with the Superman idea of a alien superhero, while the comics remain strictly mystic. (There's this enchantment on that hammer see?) When Captain America had been assassinated Thor summoned his ghost to ask if he wanted to be avenged. And then in the Ultimates during an alien invasion, that version of Thor summons the einherjar (dead heroes)...initially the Avengers thought him a madman...after doing that, there was a crisis of faith.
                            Which segues nicely into the reason that was explained to me why Disney doesn't want the God in Thunder-God; controversy. They don't want to see such characters as the Crusader which attacked Thor because of his religious beliefs. They don't want to see Thor threaten the nation with a biblical deluge as he once did when he became pissed at Iron Man and SHIELD. It's a whole lot safer (and profitable) if the movie version of Thor gets nice and neutered and plays nice with everyone else. Especially the federal government.
                            I think you are looking at a few isolated events, the exceptions to the rule, and then saying, "Yeah, that is how it is." However, when one looks at Marvel's Thor as a whole it is immediately evident how the comics approach the topic. The exceptions you highlight do not amount to enough evidence to overturn the fifty years of evidence for the other side of the question. Obviously, you don't like that approach, but that doesn't change the fact that is how Marvel has approached it since the beginning.

                            Next weekend is looking like a bust for me for movies. I might go see About Time. Has anyone seen that one yet?


                            The Forum Member Also Known as "Mike Holland"

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Storyteller View Post
                              Anyone else going to see the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special in theaters?
                              Im still debating that one. They only show it in the capital in my country so that would mean 150 dollars just taking the bus there and if i dont get some place to crash it would mean 50 more in a hotel. But on the other hand while it may seems like to much people do the same for a concert and i never care enough of going to one.


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                              Assume players are bastards, bastard coated bastards with bastard filling until proven otherwise.
                              Rule number 2
                              I don't care about the theme of personal horror.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Storyteller View Post
                                I think you are looking at a few isolated events, the exceptions to the rule, and then saying, "Yeah, that is how it is." However, when one looks at Marvel's Thor as a whole it is immediately evident how the comics approach the topic. The exceptions you highlight do not amount to enough evidence to overturn the fifty years of evidence for the other side of the question. Obviously, you don't like that approach, but that doesn't change the fact that is how Marvel has approached it since the beginning.
                                Actually I see this in reverse.
                                The few isolated stuff is in favor of the science crap.
                                Fifty years of evidence is hyperbole for not reading the original stuff...or reading the material after Simonson, who recreated Mjolnir for Beta Ray Bill with all the enchantments built into "Stormbreaker."
                                And when Mjolnir was damaged, it took Dr. Strange to fix it.
                                Marvel approached Thor from the beginning as a desire to top the Hulk:

                                Lee in 2002 described Thor's genesis early in the Marvel pantheon, following the creation of the Hulk:
                                [H]ow do you make someone stronger than the strongest person? It finally came to me: Don't make him human — make him a god. I decided readers were already pretty familiar with the Greek and Roman gods. It might be fun to delve into the old Norse legends...





                                Mankind was once an endangered species. It will likely be so again. And mankind will only have itself to blame.

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