Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Charecteristics and Origins of Vampires and the like

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Charecteristics and Origins of Vampires and the like

    Been awhile since I posted in the forums, I won't say why but I have been lurking. Been thinking about Characteristics and Origins of Supernatural creatures in films, novels and the like. I've read up on quite a bit of folklore but most stuff doesn't seem to have the most interesting of origins for the most part. I'm interested if anyone finds any origins and characteristics of Vampires and the like that are distinct from those WoD and CofD but that you still consider distinctly suited to the creature in question. So for example Mages/any other magic caster, Vamps, Werewolves, Fae even Frankenstein and Frankenstein-like things.
    Last edited by TheShadowMan; 10-11-2016, 11:40 PM.


    There was once only darkness and then there was light, I am born from the places where these forces meet.

  • #2
    Wikipedia has several good articles about the folklore origins.

    Vampires
    Werewolves
    Mage

    Keep digging, you'll find all sorts of things. After all, if you can post on here, you can access the biggest library in the world: the internet.


    - If you must be ridiculous, I must ridicule you.
    - Those that can give up essential liberties in exchange for temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -- Benjamin Franklin

    Comment


    • #3
      Papa Bear Mostly end up reading how Vampires eat fetuses from wombs using long tongues (seriously end up reading weird shit like that) quiet honestly and how most Vampire folklore and quiet a bit of other folklore has to do Humanity's complicated relationship with sex, oh yeah and apparently everything has to do with the Devil, I tell you that idea gets old quickly. Of course in folkloric terms most things that are mainly nocturnal usually come under "Vampire category" anyway. Quiet honestly I was asking more in relation to films, TV Movies and novels as opposed to folklore but maybe that wasn't so clear. I know Underworld has Werewolves and Vampires having basically a shared origin which I have mixed feelings about as a concept. I generally curious about origins that differ significantly from those of WoD and CofD but still offer a believable origin that is still distinctly characteristic of the creature in question. Of course opinions will differ greatly and I'm curious about people's opnion on this.
      Last edited by TheShadowMan; 10-11-2016, 11:48 PM.


      There was once only darkness and then there was light, I am born from the places where these forces meet.

      Comment


      • #4
        CHINESE VAMPIRES

        YOU NEED MORE CHINESE VAMPIRES


        Just call me Lex.

        Female pronouns for me, please.

        Comment


        • #5
          Seconded. You want to get away from the Devil being the end all, be all origin? Look for non-christian references of vampiric beings, like africa or asia. Chiang-shi, Pennangalan, Mannangal, Adze, Yara Ma Ya Bo, and so on.


          I'm So Meta Even This Acronym

          Comment


          • #6
            Thorbes atamajakki Papa Bear I've had a look at the Chiang-shi/Jiangshi (the hopping zombie/vampire that absorbs qi or life energy) origins of which range from nothing spectacular (virus, spirit doesn't leave body, necromancy, spirit possession), to a Lightning bolt (Frankenstein-like) after non-proper burial, to right superstitious (black cat again from non-proper burial rites) to stuff about Chinese philosophy (Huns and Pos) as well Pennangalan and Mannagal who disconnect parts of their body who I believe come out because of black magic that they performed again nothing earth shattering. Problem is Christianity has a had a big effect on the world whether you like it and therefore had an effect on folklore, Fairies of Irish supposedly started out as Pagan deities for instance and Demons possessing corpses being Vampires etc. I am aware that Vampiric beings in foklore and Mythology do predate Christinaity but it has certinaly left its mark on it. I know the Devil is meant to be the source of all evil but the Devil is a Christian thing, not like there's any proof in it - what I mean is while I know its true in some folklore it doesn't mean I have to like it. I should properply mentoin that I am an atheist who went to Christian schools of two diffrent denominations and I have an interest in Supernatural creatures as fictional beings (which I consider to include beings such things as Demons)
            Last edited by TheShadowMan; 10-17-2016, 01:19 PM.


            There was once only darkness and then there was light, I am born from the places where these forces meet.

            Comment


            • #7
              My favorite vampire origin concept is still the one Dracula 2000 went with, with the first vampire being Judas Iscariot and all of the (cinematically) "traditional" vampire weaknesses stemming from his betrayal and its aftermath.

              I've also always been a fan of the one Marvel Comics used back in the 70s and 80s, where the first vampires were Atlantean cultists of the Elder Gods transformed by the Darkhold.


              What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
              Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                My favorite vampire origin concept is still the one Dracula 2000 went with, with the first vampire being Judas Iscariot and all of the (cinematically) "traditional" vampire weaknesses stemming from his betrayal and its aftermath.
                Again a very Christian based idea but an interesting one.I have heard this origin before and I'm sure it predates the film but I've never heard it being used in a film before, might be an interesting watch.

                It works with older folklore of people becoming Vampries by comitting sucide, also the silver weakness (though I always thought it suited Werewolves more, though this is one of the times the line between Vampire and Werewolf is blurred) is explained by the fact he is payed in silver coins for his betryal.

                I've also always been a fan of the one Marvel Comics used back in the 70s and 80s, where the first vampires were Atlantean cultists of the Elder Gods transformed by the Darkhold.
                Elder gods that's Lovecraft isn't it? Darkhold, I'm not sure who this is, a bit out of my area I'm afraid.
                Last edited by TheShadowMan; 02-04-2017, 10:22 AM.


                There was once only darkness and then there was light, I am born from the places where these forces meet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  In undergrad, I took an intellectual history class on Vampire Narratives. We read short stories, books, and watched movies and TV to unpack what the media said about cultural fears at the time of the media's creation. I posted the syllabus in the Vampire forums a while back. I'll repost here.


                  Hayley Margules, historian and former OPP writer
                  Chronicles of Darkness: Dark Eras and Companion, Beast: The Primordial Ready-Made Characters, and Dark Ages: Tome of Secrets

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here it is! This was not written by me, it was written by Professor Katharina Vester at American University. I’ve cut out sections on grading, course format, academic support, and campus resources.

                    AMST 296-001/HIST 296-003
                    Blood and Desire: Vampire Narratives and American Society
                    For almost two hundred years, vampire narratives have served as projection surfaces for cultural angst and fears of social change. This course investigates how vampires have been used to negotiate immigration and xenophobia, women’s suffrage, fear of miscegenation, the Cold War, homophobia, and AIDS. The course considers what aims the contemporary obsession with vampire narratives serves and what it reveals about today’s culture.
                    The material discussed in this class, because of the nature of the genre, is often gruesome and at times sexually explicit. As you decide to take this class, please consider that watching and reading the materials are crucial to your success in class but not all of this material may be pleasant to read.
                    […]
                    Learning Objectives:
                    • To understand the recent vampire craze within its historical context.
                    • To investigate how the change in vampire narratives reflects the cultural context of the time.
                    • To access US history through popular culture.
                    • To understand how popular culture promotes and resists gender, race, and class ideology.
                    […]
                    08/26 Introduction: Why Vampires?

                    08/29 Each Era Has Its Own Vampire
                    Read: Eveline Brugger: “Where Do the Cullens Fit In? Vampires in European Folklore, Science and Fiction;” Nina Auerbach from Our Vampires/Ourselves: “Introduction,” “Byron’s Ghost.”

                    Part 1: The Vampire in Western Literature and History

                    09/02 Bloody Beginnings
                    Read: John Polidori, The Vampyre (free on the Internet. For instance: http://www.sff.net/people/ doylemacdonald/l_vampyr.htm.)

                    09/05 Carmilla: The Rise of the Female Vampire
                    Read: J. Sheridan LeFanu, Carmilla (free on the Internet. For instance: http://www.sff.net/people/ doylemacdonald/l_carmil.htm.)

                    09/09 The Original Dracula
                    Read: Bram Stoker, Dracula (chapters 1-5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 13, 16, 18, 19, 21) (free on the Internet. For instance: http://www.literature.org/authors/stoker-bram/dracula/.)

                    09/12 Bram Stoker’s Dracula--Criticism
                    Read: Franco Moretti: “A Capital Dracula”; Jimmie Cain: “Racism and the Vampire: The Anti-Slavic Premise of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897).”

                    Part 2: The History of Vampires in Popular Culture

                    09/16 Silent Screams: Dracula on the Silver Screen
                    Watch: Dracula
                    Read: Nina Auerbach; “Dracula and Draculas”; start Richard Matheson, I Am Legend.

                    09/19 World War II: Vampires and War Propaganda
                    Watch: The Return of the Vampire
                    Read: Richard Matheson, I Am Legend

                    09/23 Cold War Vampire Movies
                    Watch: Horror of Dracula
                    Read: Lois H. Palmer: “Hammering it Home”; Richard Matheson, I Am Legend.

                    09/26 Fear of Mass Destruction: Vampires and the Cold War
                    Read: Finish Richard Matheson, I Am Legend for today’s meeting; start Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire.

                    09/30 I Am Legend: Interpretations
                    Watch: Omega Man; I Am Legend
                    Read: Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire.

                    10/03 1970s: Vampires and Blaxploitation
                    Watch: Blacula
                    Read: Paul Lehman and John Edgar Browning: “The Dracula and the Blacula (1972) Cultural Revolution;” Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire.

                    10/07 The 1970s Vampire Revival: Interview with the Vampire
                    Read: Finish Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire for today’s meeting.

                    10/10 Reagan’s Vampires: Consumerism and the Family
                    Watch: The Lost Boys
                    Read: Nicola Nixon: “When Hollywood Sucks, or, Hungry Girls, Lost Boys, and Vampirism in the Age of Reagan”; start with Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    10/14 AIDS and the Vampire Film
                    Quiz 2
                    Watch: Bram Stoker’s Dracula
                    Read: Lisa Nystrom: “Blood, Lust, and the Fe/Male Narrative in Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992) and the Novel (1897)”; Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    10/17 Black Masculinity and the Blade Trilogy
                    Watch: Blade
                    Read: Gretchen Bakke: “Dead White Men: An Essay on the Changing Dynamics of Race in US Action Cinema”; Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    Part 3: Case Studies

                    10/21 Buffy, the Vampire Slayer: The Allure
                    To do: If you haven’t watched Buffy, the Vampire Slayer before, you may want to do some online-research to help you understand the structure and content of the series. Wikipedia offers an excellent plot summary of all seven seasons. On Blackboard you will find Roz Kaveney’s “She Saved the World. A Lot” which provides an extensive introduction to the series.
                    Watch: Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, season 4: episodes “Freshman” and “Living Conditions.”
                    Read: Patricia Pender: “’I am Buffy, and…You’re History:’ The Postmodern Politics of Buffy”; Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    10/24 Buffy, the Vampire Slayer: Femininity and Feminism
                    Watch: Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, season 2, episode “Halloween”; and season 5, episode “Buffy vs. Dracula.”
                    Read: Mimi Marinucci: “Femininsm and the Ethics of Violence: Why Buffy Kicks Ass;” Elyce Rae Helford: “’My Emotions Give me Power:’ The Containment of Girls’ Anger in Buffy”; Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    10/28 Buffy, the Vampire Slayer: Race and Aesthetic Innovation
                    Watch: Buffy, the Vampire Slayer, season 6, episode “Once More (With Feeling),” season 4, episode “Hush.”
                    Read: Kent Ono: “To be a Vampire on Buffy, the Vampire Slayer. Race and (‘Other’) Socially Marginalizing Positions on Horror TV”; Stephenie Meyer, Twilight.

                    10/31 Twilight: Gender and the American Dream
                    Read: Melissa Ames: “Twilight Follows Tradition: Analyzing Biting Critiques of Vampire Narratives for Their Portrayal of Gender and Sexuality”; Sara Buttsworth, “’CinderBella’: Twilight, Fairy Tales, and the Twenty-First Century American Dream.” Finish Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight for today’s meeting.

                    11/04 Twilight and the Body
                    Read: Karin Nykvist: “The Body Project”; Sara Kärrholm, “’Loving You is Like Loving the Dead’: Eroticization of the Dead Body”; Mariah Larson: “’I know what I saw:’ The Female Gaze and the Male Object of Desire.”

                    11/07 Twilight: Race and Ethnicity
                    Watch: The Twilight Saga: New Moon
                    Read: Natalie Wilson, “Civilized Vampires Versus Savage Werewolves: Race and Ethnicity in the Twilight Series.”

                    11/11 Twilight: Fan Culture
                    Read: Elizabeth Behm-Morawitz, Melissa A. Click, & Jennifer Stevens Aubrey, “Relating to Twilight: Fans’ Responses to Love and Romance in the Vampire Franchise”; Jessica Sheffield & Elyse Merlo, “Biting Back: Twilight Anti-Fandom and the Rhetoric of Superiority.”

                    11/14 True Blood: The South
                    If you haven’t watched True Blood before, you may want to engage in some research. The HBO homepage offers some previews and information. More information you can find on IMDb and Wikipedia. You may also want to check out TrueBlood.net.
                    Watch: Season 1, episode “Strange Love.”
                    Read: Evangelia Kindinger, “Reading Supernatural Fiction as Regional Fiction”; Caroline Ruddell and Brigid Cherry, “’More Than Cold and Heartless:’ The Southern Gothic Milieu of True Blood”; Victoria Amador: “Blacks and Whites: Trash and Good Country People in True Blood.”

                    11/18 True Blood: Sexuality
                    Watch: Season 1, episode “Mine!”
                    Read: Patricia Brace and Robert Arp: “Coming out of the Coffin and Coming out of the Closet”; Darren Elliot-Smith, “The Homosexual Vampire is a Metaphor for…The Homosexual Vampire?”


                    Again, I did not compose this syllabus, this was written by Professor Vester at American University.


                    Hayley Margules, historian and former OPP writer
                    Chronicles of Darkness: Dark Eras and Companion, Beast: The Primordial Ready-Made Characters, and Dark Ages: Tome of Secrets

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by TheShadowMan View Post
                      Again a very Christian based idea but an interesting one.I have heard this origin before and I'm sure it predates the film but I've never heard it being used in a film before, might be an interesting watch.
                      It's an interesting film. I wouldn't call it great, but it does have one of the more fun vampire hunter lairs I can remember. IIRC, in the directors commentary on the DVD (hey, remember those?), they mention its a preexisting legend, but I can't recall when and where it originates from.


                      Originally posted by TheShadowMan View Post
                      Elder gods that's Lovecraft isn't it? Darkhold, I'm not sure who this is, a bit out of my area I'm afraid.
                      Back in the 1970s and 80s, part of the official history of the Marvel Universe was that when the earth was still in its proto-development phase, it was the playground of a bunch of amoral godlike beings that are usually referred to as the elder or ancient gods (Lovecraftian without actually having to deal with the legal issues of really using Lovecraft's stuff). One of said gods was Gaia, who decided to get rid of all the others by giving birth to a being called Demiurge the God-Eater. Demiurge proceeded to earn his name by eating all the other elder gods. A few of them read the writing on the wall and escaped into other dimensions. One of them, The Dread Chthon, left behind an anchor so he could return to earth at some point. This anchor was a book of dark, corrupting and blasphemous knowledge that became known as the Darkhold. The Darkhold can not be destroyed by an means known to man and alters its form to keep up with the times (stone tablets, scrolls, a book, now a days it might actually end up online). During the days of ancient Atlantis, a group of sorcerers found the Darkhold and formed a cult around it. When Atlantis was destroyed, the leader of the cult used the Darkhold to turn himself into something that would survive and became the first vampire. Eventually, Dracula came along, killed the first vampire and drank his blood to become the new Lord of Vampires. (And then Doctor Strange came along and used the Darkhold to destroy every vampire on earth.)

                      Anyway, I always found it an interesting origin for vampires.

                      Also interesting, the one Anne Rice uses in Queen of the Damned, with ancient Egyptians being possessed by demons.




                      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X