Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

[Monarchies of Mau] Enemy factions for a game. Ideas anyone?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • [Monarchies of Mau] Enemy factions for a game. Ideas anyone?

    So, I'm prepping a game of MoM for a group, and I'm debating on a few things. Now, I can't help but compare the game to D&D: Pugmire really feels like what I imagine a stereotypical human civilization would be like in any other setting, while the Monarchies of Mau feel more like elves. Long lives (via reincarnation), innately magical through genetics, strongly individualistic while having ties to fae courts (Houses!) and royalty. Their callings include the equivalent of bard, druid, warlock, ranger and monk, classically fae classes. Well, not the monk perhaps. But the rest? Defnitely. There's even the fallen "dark elf" types (House -redacted-) that live in the shadows. Badgers have an Orc King type plot. Exotic lizard folk which might include dragon-style magic stuff. Rats that fill much the same niche as goblins and kobalds mixed with a bit of mindflayer-ness thanks to Laba Tor.

    I'm trying to figure out what kind of abilities and goals I should give House Smilodon. Anyone have any ideas for the fallen monarchy? History, abilities, focus, Non-Mau precepts?

    I have an ultimate idea of what I want the Unseen to be, plotwise. However, I'm kind of at a loss of what to do with them in terms of threats. Sure, there are "hellhounds" and shadow cats and possessions. What other threats should be associated with the Unseen?

    Laba Tor has alchemists and psychics. Any other ideas for the White Rats?

    What other forms of challenges are available for the cats to face? Intrigue is going to be a big part of the play, so I'm thinking of mainly including the Lizardfolk, Pugmire-ians, internal House rivalries, Smilodon infiltration. Should I work out some social system beyond what this 5e-esk rule system offers if I'm going to do intrigue?

  • #2
    Just an asside where do you get Druid from? I'd say Paladin, MOnk, Ranger, Rogue, Bard and wizard(Don't see much of any warlock on mancers)

    Comment


    • #3
      As a note, cats don't actually reincarnate. They simply think they do. Their belief in reincarnation is exactly as valid as the dog's belief that humanity are gods actively watching over them.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MCN View Post
        So, I'm prepping a game of MoM for a group, and I'm debating on a few things. Now, I can't help but compare the game to D&D: Pugmire really feels like what I imagine a stereotypical human civilization would be like in any other setting, while the Monarchies of Mau feel more like elves. Long lives (via reincarnation), innately magical through genetics, strongly individualistic while having ties to fae courts (Houses!) and royalty. Their callings include the equivalent of bard, druid, warlock, ranger and monk, classically fae classes. Well, not the monk perhaps. But the rest? Defnitely. There's even the fallen "dark elf" types (House -redacted-) that live in the shadows. Badgers have an Orc King type plot. Exotic lizard folk which might include dragon-style magic stuff. Rats that fill much the same niche as goblins and kobalds mixed with a bit of mindflayer-ness thanks to Laba Tor.

        I'm trying to figure out what kind of abilities and goals I should give House Smilodon. Anyone have any ideas for the fallen monarchy? History, abilities, focus, Non-Mau precepts?

        I have an ultimate idea of what I want the Unseen to be, plotwise. However, I'm kind of at a loss of what to do with them in terms of threats. Sure, there are "hellhounds" and shadow cats and possessions. What other threats should be associated with the Unseen?

        Laba Tor has alchemists and psychics. Any other ideas for the White Rats?

        What other forms of challenges are available for the cats to face? Intrigue is going to be a big part of the play, so I'm thinking of mainly including the Lizardfolk, Pugmire-ians, internal House rivalries, Smilodon infiltration. Should I work out some social system beyond what this 5e-esk rule system offers if I'm going to do intrigue?

        The problem is, Pugmire was supposed to be a "pets after people" setting, with dogs cats and other uplifted races rediscovering human technology (guns, engines, cars, computers, etc..) but funnily misinterpretating it as magic and gifts of the gods. Instead we got yet another furry magical setting.
        Last edited by Raistlin; 05-31-2017, 12:55 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          I want to have fun with this, yes, the reincarnation thing through a techno angle, yes, with magical fantasy setting. I was kind of hoping people had some ideas to share... I gave y'all some thoughts on how I was seeing things, hoping for more feed back, or some other inspirations...
          Last edited by MCN; 05-31-2017, 12:01 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Raistlin View Post


            The problem is, Pugmire was supposed to be a "pets after people" setting, with dogs cats and other uplifted races rediscovering human technology (guns, engines, cars, computers, etc..) but funnily misinterpretating it as magic and gifts of the gods. Instead we got yet another furry magical setting.

            I see it more as furry Numinera without the blatant "OH THAT"S JUST SCIENCE"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Raistlin View Post
              The problem is, Pugmire was supposed to be a "pets after people" setting, with dogs cats and other uplifted races rediscovering human technology (guns, engines, cars, computers, etc..) but funnily misinterpretating it as magic and gifts of the gods..
              Luckily, it still is! Some people want to play it more like a traditional fantasy setting. Other people want to delve into the humorous potential of the setting. But the people who just want to make dog jokes don't need a whole lot of setting material, while the people who want to play it straight do. So, naturally, the semi-serious setting material is going to get a bit more focus.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by eddyfate View Post

                Luckily, it still is! Some people want to play it more like a traditional fantasy setting. Other people want to delve into the humorous potential of the setting. But the people who just want to make dog jokes don't need a whole lot of setting material, while the people who want to play it straight do. So, naturally, the semi-serious setting material is going to get a bit more focus.
                I think the part Raistilin was complaining about was the elements like look like "real magic" as opposed to misinterpreted technology undermining the latter.

                Of course my response there is that the Dogs and Cats being uplifted means there should be human tech FAR more advanced than our tech, so the "sufficiently advanced" principle applies to our pov too.


                Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've got scientific explanations behind every spell and quirk of the Monarchies. In fact, I have them detailed out for whenever it comes up in play. Yes, I have explanations why an iPad 37X can cast fireball, why a monk kicks electricity, why rats can kill people with their minds and no one else can. I have details on how uplifted dragons came about, and why undead are a thing (as well as the undead lich-lord Huskna!). I also have my own homebrew lizard-people and beaver callings and magics (kinda).

                  Once you have that? Its merely a question of how its described. If you give descriptions that sound sciency, then it melds into the players' minds that way.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MCN View Post
                    I've got scientific explanations behind every spell and quirk of the Monarchies. In fact, I have them detailed out for whenever it comes up in play. Yes, I have explanations why an iPad 37X can cast fireball, why a monk kicks electricity, why rats can kill people with their minds and no one else can. I have details on how uplifted dragons came about, and why undead are a thing (as well as the undead lich-lord Huskna!). I also have my own homebrew lizard-people and beaver callings and magics (kinda).

                    Once you have that? Its merely a question of how its described. If you give descriptions that sound sciency, then it melds into the players' minds that way.
                    Yes! That all sounds very cool, and neatly underlines the idea that Pugmire and Monarchies of Mau are really open for playing them in the way that is fun for your table. Really, the only wrong way (crazy and illegal edge-case stuff aside) is not to have fun with them.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                      Of course my response there is that the Dogs and Cats being uplifted means there should be human tech FAR more advanced than our tech, so the "sufficiently advanced" principle applies to our pov too.
                      That's definitely a topic I cover in some detail in the full Pugmire book, but in general you're right -- any sufficiently advanced magic is indistinguishable from technology, or something like that.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MCN View Post
                        Once you have that? Its merely a question of how its described. If you give descriptions that sound sciency, then it melds into the players' minds that way.
                        That's definitely it! I mean, it's one thing to say "you hit the robot, and sparks fly out." It's another to say "you hit the animated suit of armor, and it starts to bleed lightning."

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X