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What would a French braid be, in Creation?

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  • #16
    A "high braid," and "long bread," probably.

    Replacing place names with place names is confusing, so I favor descriptive ones. This also seems to be the approach taken with the megafauna in the Core.


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    • #17
      Originally posted by BrilliantRain View Post

      I don't suppose you could post that?

      It's a written/drawn in journal, so I'll need to translate it into type. But I can drop some of the glossary we keep when I get home. You more interested in the Solar Cookbook, or our headcanon glossary? It's a monstrously bloated and unorganized beast from the dawn of 2E.




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      • #18
        I too prefer using description instead of substituting place names. Translating from German, a French bread could be called a bar bread or pole bread ("Stangenbrot"). According to Wikipedia, a French braid in Spanish is also called a "trenza de raíz", that is a root braid.


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        • #19
          A lot of this discussion sounds good when you have time to work out the details (i.e. figure out the German name of "French bread" could be called bar bread) but if you find you need to describe a meal and you suddenly have to come up with an appropriate name for French Bread it is not so easy. Even if you are good and tell the players there is a basket of bar bread, odds are they will not know what that is and you may eventually say it is the equivalent to French Bread.

          So if you are going to describe bar bread as basically French Bread anyway, I do not see the problem with going with French Bread right off the bat.

          And as noted, people may not be familiar with the entomology of some things (Champaign) so it is easily explained that a particular sparkling wine has the brand name or region name that people are not aware of.


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          • #20
            For French Braid, I'd use "Dynast Braid" or something similar. For that word, it's less about the locations and more about the culture. "French" has the connotation of high society. I can see Dynasts on the Blessed Isle holding the same position in Creation.

            For French Bread, I'd use "Crusty Bread", because that is what it is. In my Shogunate Quest, I used "Fruit Cups" for Italian Ice. "Fried Potatoes" for French Fries.

            Basically, I just use the description of the item instead of the real world name. Or names that have a strong connotation like Dynast with high society.

            For words like narcissistic which come from ancient myths, I leave as is. Too confusing to rename.
            Last edited by wonderandawe; 03-14-2017, 11:21 AM.


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            • #21
              Originally posted by Boston123 View Post
              Probably something Northern, like a "Whitewall Twist".
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              • #22
                French Fries become Nexus Nuggets.


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                • #23
                  Place-name qualifiers are wierd in general. They don't tend to follow any particular rules. The French braid, for example, is thousands ofor years older than anything called "France", and the term probably came into English more because of association between France and fashion than between the hairstyle and France. Interestingly in French it's still called a French braid, but that may well be a case of a reverse-loan. See also things like "cafe americano" (literally "American coffee" in Italian, now used by Americans to mean a particular Italian style of coffee) or creme Anglais (a French dessert, literally "English cream" but used in English too, even more interestingly the same dessert in French is known interchangeably as creme francais).

                  In Neil Stephenson's Baroque Cycle (and maybe in real history?) the English call syphilis "the French pox" and the French call it "the English pox".
                  Last edited by Blackwell; 03-14-2017, 02:21 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Blackwell View Post
                    Place-name qualifiers are wierd in general. They don't tend to follow any particular rules. The French braid, for example, is thousands ofor years older than anything called "France", and the term probably came into English more because of association between France and fashion than between the hairstyle and France. Interestingly in French it's still called a French braid, but that may well be a case of a reverse-loan. See also things like "cafe americano" (literally "American coffee" in Italian, now used by Americans to mean a particular Italian style of coffee) or creme Anglais (a French dessert, literally "English cream" but used in English too, even more interestingly the same dessert in French is known interchangeably as creme francais).

                    In Neil Stephenson's Baroque Cycle (and maybe in real history?) the English call syphilis "the French pox" and the French call it "the English pox".
                    ​So I think what we can take from all of this is to not get too hung up on analogues to specific terms in favour of drawing upon them for inspiration of all kinds of fascinating insights that arise from the national associations people make with things and related preconceptions.

                    ​Mind, I would posit that the reason you only really start seeing these kinds of terms come up since about the 18th century is that it's about the time when concepts of nationalism and the nation-state are starting to come up.


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