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Transports in Creation

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  • Transports in Creation

    Hello

    I read somewhere that there was some sort of wagons and trains used in some regions of Creation. Does that means that there are some steam engine in Creation ? Are they artifacts ? Is there some railways that link Big city one another ?

    More generally, what kind of transport are somewhat common in Creation ?

  • #2
    The most common form of transportation for mortals in Creation is their own feet. Horses and other animals, carts, wagons, ships, and palanquins rank below those; as well as skis, hang gliders, and air-boats in the North.

    Magical clouds, automatons, summoned demons and elementals, simhatas, artifact vessels, and warstriders are all so rare as to be restricted to gods, Exalts, and sorcerers.

    If you have a steam engine in Creation, it's probably an Artifact, and most likely one you tore out of a ruin to repurpose for your own needs, and don't know where to start replicating it.

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    • #3
      You must be thinking of the old "Stormwind Rider wagon" trick.

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      • #4
        Are you recalling something like: Masters of Jade, page 35 "The caravans of Ghauli Wolf-Son are pulled through the East by a decrepit Shogunate war-golem, still sturdy enough to haul an entire wagon train," and other examples of how a single relic can transform a trading company's operations?

        ​A "wagon train" by the way, does not require rail transport. Just a lot of covered wagons, more usually drawn by horses, or yeddim, travelling along the same trail for mutual protection.
        Last edited by Greyman; 04-14-2017, 07:47 AM.

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        • #5
          In The Compass of Terrestrial Direction : Scavenger Lands p.76

          In the "Spring Market" paragraph, it says "Wagons are stuffed with the remains and favorite possessions of their honored dead and sent in trains to Sijan"

          Maybe it's more like wagon pulled by horse, Far West style ?

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          • #6
            "Wagon train" is just a way of saying "a lot of (usually-horse-pulled) wagons traveling together." Traveling in a group has a lot of advantages.

            It has nothing to do with steam-powered locomotives on a rail system; using "train" to refer to a succession of vehicles moving the same way predates the railroads.
            Last edited by TheCountAlucard; 04-14-2017, 07:54 AM.

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            • #7
              OK Thank you.

              I have to say that I'm a little disappointed, I really would like to have a place in Creation where there is a need for that kind of transport (like the Haslanti with the Airship)

              If it would be the case, where could it be find ? Maybe in the South ?

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              • #8
                In 2e, the Jadeborn had magic long-distance subways with dematerializing cars. Autochthon also has tram lines, but that's not really "Creation".

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                • #9
                  Canal technology is probably pretty widespread. Canals were effectively trains before trains existed. They're quite effective at what they do - in fact, America was originally intended to be linked by a canal network initially before railways took over. This technology was useful enough to be practiced until just a few hundred years ago! Canals can move goods over vast distances with comparatively little energy, and they even can provide temperature control or irrigation in remote regions.

                  And in terms of setting appropriate technology, it's ancient, too. We have evidence of canals going back to the bronze age, so it wouldn't be out of place in Exalted at all.

                  I expect Creation has several very impressive and epic canal networks that probably dwarf many earth examples.

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                  • #10
                    Yeah, wagon trains are not at all like the kind of trains people think of that run of rails and such.

                    Years ago during one game, I introduced an old First Age magical road in the North. Any wagon or wheeled carriage put on the road would automatically be pulled forward by a magical force, with the equivalent of two yeddims. This basically functioned kind of like a train, in that people could put their wagons on it and pull them around, but only along a very specific route.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Gaara View Post
                      I really would like to have a place in Creation where there is a need for that kind of transport (like the Haslanti with the Airship)
                      ​Well, everywhere and nowhere has a need for it. That is to say, anywhere can benefit from it, but trade and transport existed for long before it.

                      ​I imagine that many people don't really consider it so much these days, but the invention of the locomotive was massively transformative as far as the world goes. The singular capacity it creates for the overland transportation of goods, raw materials and people across long distances by an enormous degree, a massive leap from anything that had ever happened before... it really created the 19th century, and the modern era. It was the first thing, ever, to provide a means of overland transportation more significant than a horse.

                      ​The point of that is that if a place has locomotives as an actual integrated system upon which society can rely, rather than the singular possession of some powerful individual, one is looking at a society that has a massive leg up on all neighbours.

                      Originally posted by TheCountAlucard
                      so rare as to be restricted to gods, Exalts, and sorcerers.
                      ​Don't forget the very rich.

                      Originally posted by Piff
                      Canals were effectively trains before trains existed.
                      ​They're effective, but they tend to be a lot slower and have a lower carrying capacity. I believe they're also not quite as versatile; as far as I know, there aren't generally canals that are capable of branching or having junctions, meaning they can only ever really go in one direction, and there's only so much land one can devote to canals. A train track can start at a common departure point that then branches off to multiple destinations. Plus, I understand that tracks can often go places that canals generally can't, such as through mountains.



                      I have approximate knowledge of many things.
                      Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
                      https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
                        ​They're effective, but they tend to be a lot slower and have a lower carrying capacity. I believe they're also not quite as versatile; as far as I know, there aren't generally canals that are capable of branching or having junctions, meaning they can only ever really go in one direction, and there's only so much land one can devote to canals. A train track can start at a common departure point that then branches off to multiple destinations. Plus, I understand that tracks can often go places that canals generally can't, such as through mountains.
                        Canals can branch, and do so all the time. You can go either direction in a canal, as well. Obviously, yeah, changes in elevation are a problem... but the great canal in China, for example, manages to be massive despite these issues! Large enough to cover the ENTIRE Scavenger Lands! For ancient world infrastructure, it's hard to beat the canal, which is why empires throughout history have built them.

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                        • #13
                          Before the development of the steam engine (and, therefore, the Industrial Revolution and the railroad), most bulk goods were moved by water: by boat, raft or ship, over river, canal and ocean.

                          It is cheaper, easier and arguably faster to ship 1000 pounds of X 500 miles over water, than it is to ship 100 pounds of X 50 miles overland.

                          One of the many reasons ~90% of human settlements are located by bodies of water.

                          Other than that, you are left with the cart, the wagon, the sled, the horse/riding beast and the human back.

                          In the North, depending on the type of snow, one could use the sled, skis, snowshoes .

                          Also, in the North (and anywhere where there is a sizable amount of snow on the ground, or where rivers freeze over), if bulk/heavy goods are going to be shipped overland, chances are they are going to be moved during winter. It is easier to slide goods over snow in a sled, than through mud on a cart/wagon.
                          Last edited by Boston123; 04-14-2017, 02:32 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Piff View Post

                            Canals can branch, and do so all the time.
                            ​So there are, although the dynamics and logistics are still a bit different.

                            Originally posted by Piff
                            You can go either direction in a canal, as well.
                            I was sure I changed that; it wasn't supposed to be about direction, but route.

                            ​Still, it's not correct either way.

                            Originally posted by Piff
                            but the great canal in China, for example, manages to be massive despite these issues! Large enough to cover the ENTIRE Scavenger Lands! For ancient world infrastructure, it's hard to beat the canal, which is why empires throughout history have built them.
                            ​Oh to be sure, I'm not knocking the canal. I'm just pointing out how it doesn't quite have the same logistic effects of the train.


                            I have approximate knowledge of many things.
                            Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
                            https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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                            • #15
                              Maybe somewherd has a version of the hyperloop. Small carts that when innthe tunnel travel incredibly fast to the other end

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