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Exalted Shop Prices - Manacle and Coin 3rd edition

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  • #16
    It’s also worth noting that, if you spend a bunch of jade on a jeweled goblet, the craftsperson isn’t taking all of that jade home as profit. Most of it probably went into buying the gold and jewels. The innkeeper has maintenance costs, food costs, paying staff, etc. So, it’s important to note that, just because the book says “this type of person makes X amount per month” it doesn’t necessarily mean that they don’t sell things for many times that amount, just that they make amount X as profit.


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    • #17
      Originally posted by BrilliantRain View Post
      Anyone who doesn’t have an existing relationship with the person they’re dealing with should expect to overpay significantly
      Only problem there is that even an eighth of a dinar is still far too much money to even overpay for most things with; it's normally enough to feed an adult for two weeks after all. Which is why I eventually caved and headcanoned a standard copper Threshold coin into my chronicle just to avoid headaches down the road.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Sith_Happens View Post

        Only problem there is that even an eighth of a dinar is still far too much money to even overpay for most things with; it's normally enough to feed an adult for two weeks after all. Which is why I eventually caved and headcanoned a standard copper Threshold coin into my chronicle just to avoid headaches down the road.
        Copper makes sense for a lower denomination coin. The Realm's lowest form of jade script, the yen and its derivatives, are also copper coins.

        It might also be worth noting that the Resources merit denotes an income or source of revenue, rather than just coinage on hand at any given time. The way that I run it in my games is basically to divide the yearly income for the merit by 60, and make that the kind of money that would come their way around every week. Alternatively, if the player is somewhat more distant from their source of wealth, you could divide their yearly income by 15 to reflect monthly revenue or by 5 to reflect seasonal revenue. It's all about how exactly your players make their money.

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        • #19
          It might been that pesants of the realm rarely or never see actual money and trade in goods and services instead. Is that part of the setting as such?
          Last edited by light-hero; 02-20-2018, 06:55 AM.

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          • #20
            It is. I would actually assume that for instance, any copper currency or such is probably local tender and just not really useful out of their contexts. Think things like the cities in I think Southeast Asia where folks used local casino chips as currency. Folks probably locally have silver for big things but for day to day are running debts and such.

            This kind of goes with an eight a dinar for an overnight stay. I think the general idea is that if you are going to be in town one night, you find somewhere you can pay in labor or something like a temple or don't pay at all, like an abandoned rest stop. And if you pay more, the assumption is you're overpaying or staying longer than one night.


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            • #21
              That's what the devs have said. It's mentioned in the book too, a couple of times.

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              • #22
                As the guy who spearheaded 3e's handling of Resources: It's not so much that 3e shifts the way Resources works absolutely from 1e and 2e as it is that 1e and 2e were inconsistent on how Resources works, and I tried to make 3e's Resources consistent with one of the ways 1e's Resources worked... but this means all the inconsistent bits about 1e's handling of Resources stand out more.

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                • #23
                  There are some old threads that might be relevant here. Note that these are pre third edition.

                  http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/m...-the-threshold
                  http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/m...coin-in-3rd-ed


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                  • #24
                    Hmmm. Exalted doesn’t really track equipment so much. You’re generally assumed to have the stuff you need to do something, unless that stuff is 1) huge, 2) rare/special, or 3) both. Like, it can be assumed that you have a backpack with basic craft tools, but you usually can’t carry around a fully stocked workshop. And, if you stop at a teahouse, as long as you have Resources 1 or higher, you can have a nice meal.

                    So, it seems like the only time you really need to interact with money is when you’re in a situation where you want something you can’t afford, in which case a bargain roll (or larceny roll) should be used to try to buy it anyway, using the standard rules. Well, or when you’re playing a merchant type and one of your goals is creating a trade empire, in which case we’re back to the question of “how much roleplaying of building a trade empire is enough to boost my various “I’m a merchant princess” backgrounds is enough?” which the system doesn’t currently answer and is best negotiated with your ST. (It also makes Bureaucracy charms near useless, but I’m not bitter.)

                    Now, all that said, figuring out the appropriate general resources rating for various goods and services is useful, so you know what the general breakpoint is for being able to just get something, instead of having to bargain for it. But I’m not sure that assigning a specific cost in coins to anything will be particularly useful, especially since that cost will vary hugely depending on where you are in Creation. Which is kind of the point.

                    If you’re among the tribes of the far east, a few sacks of iron arrow heads, ten bronze axheads, and several strings of glass beads might be enough to get a crate full of rare herbs or a few life flowers that sell for a Dynast’s ransom back in Nexus. Cowrie Shells are money in the West but basically worthless elsewhere, but Maiden Tea made with the Western clam extract that increases its efficaciousness to 99% is highly prized by those who know the difference, so trading silver for cowrie shells isn’t actually a stupid idea. And so on.

                    Creating price lists for different regions could be hugely useful, but that would be a heck of a lot of work.
                    Last edited by BrilliantRain; 02-20-2018, 12:40 PM.


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                    • #25
                      In the terms of resources earned I have always seen it as profit not cost. So if you say a tavern keep gets a obol once every 1/2 year then that is after the cost of upkeep of his business. I will make adjustments as needed and will repost them as soon as I can


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                      • #26
                        Ok, looking into the system it appears that those who work in threshold make more money than in the Realm. An obol equal 7 3/4th which is the current conversion rate.

                        In the Realm - day of work equals one Yen for an adult
                        In the Threshold - a month of work of two adults is one dinar
                        Calendar month holds 28 days

                        One Dinar is equal to 128 yen

                        So anyone in the realm who is a skilled worker must work 2 2/7 times more to equal the pay of someone of equal standing in the threshold.

                        Please let me know if my math is wrong


                        Like the Sun I am relentless even in death...

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Rahod View Post
                          Ok, looking into the system it appears that those who work in threshold make more money than in the Realm. An obol equal 7 3/4th which is the current conversion rate.

                          In the Realm - day of work equals one Yen for an adult
                          In the Threshold - a month of work of two adults is one dinar
                          Calendar month holds 28 days

                          One Dinar is equal to 128 yen

                          So anyone in the realm who is a skilled worker must work 2 2/7 times more to equal the pay of someone of equal standing in the threshold.

                          Please let me know if my math is wrong
                          I think, using those data points, one Dinar would be worth 56 yen. What with two adults making 1 yen per day, that would add up to 28 yen each month, basically. Then a household of two working adults could be expected to make 56 yen every month.

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                          • #28
                            I would agree but a yen is 1/1024 of obol and 1 obol is equal to 7.75. So correcting my math a Dinar is worth 132 1/8 yen. which based on that its conversion per day is 2 1/3 yen that a dynastic skilled worker makes in the threshold. So 1 dinar can't equal 56 yen.

                            But what does that all mean - working for the Dynasty pays crap but gets you their protection and education to a point. And if someone who grew up in the Dynasty left and worked in the threshold would make way more for their family then they ever could in the Dynasty. Which falls back to the Dragon-blooded keeping their poor the poorest but the safest.
                            Last edited by Rahod; 02-20-2018, 04:18 PM.


                            Like the Sun I am relentless even in death...

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                            • #29
                              I think that in the Realm, peasants might handle currency a bit more than is common in a lot of the Threshold as a result of various policies and incentives, as a means of keeping them participating in the wider economy in a subservient fashion without placing them directly under the authority of any local power.

                              But even then, not really something you paid your neighbours with; more of a community resource for when some folks needed to go off to town, and a process to mediate their selling products in local economic centres so that the community can pay its taxes.

                              ​The way that prior Editions described some of the methods that the Dynasty was using to assert power over the peasantry, I could see the future of the Realm to include a concerted effort to remove their stocks of cash, possibly in the form of various trumped up taxes and fines and other expenses.



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                              • #30
                                I would like to preface this with the caveat that I myself have studied both economics and classical history, and that one of the key players in my group is a historian with a specialization in the Roman Empire. As such, our games tend to end up with a stronger focus on hard currency exchange than most.

                                The solution that my group has found to this lack of day-to-day coinage for the silver standard is to import a portion of the Augustan Roman currency, with the Denarius replaced by the dinar (given that the RL dinar was based on the denarius, this was an easy conversion).

                                Specifically, the coins we brought into exalted were the Sestertius (a large copper coin), worth 1/4 Denarii, the As (a medium copper coin) worth 1/4 Sestertii, and the Quardans (a small copper coin) worth 1/4 Asses. The other coins, like the semis, we determined to be unnecessary and did not translate over, to keep things easier and lock in a 1:4 conversion rate between coins.

                                This solution has worked very well for us, though we tend to have very little direct interaction with the jade standard in game and tend to use the resource merit solely as a measure of expected monthly income.

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