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  • Non-Human Races?

    Non-Human Races - have you ever included them? How? Why?


    Yes, we have Mountain Folk, Dragon Kings, the Lintha and Crafted Races - but these are all so geographically desperate that it's unfathomable to think of them ever having "popular stereotypes". Games with them will usually be about them, unless you're just visiting as a one-off adventure. Humanity has always been king in Exalted - and I appreciate that.

    But do I?

    I mean that "racial tropes" in other games have built-in problems.
    • Races have gradually lost social relevance - an "Half-Orc, High Elf & Dwarf" party (unimaginable in another era!) is all par for the course now.
    • Races have mechanical bonuses - so you usually see each race play 3-4 specific classes. Not really diverse.
    • Races discourage themes without mechanical bonuses. Not many Orc Wizards or Tiefling Barbarians, right?
    So by dodging races altogether, Exalted has done something lovely. And I love how other tropes are absorbed into mega-tropes - Centaurs, Harpies, etc can be Beastmen tribes (Lunars thus providing one clean creation-myth for all of them); Banshees, Zombies, Ghosts, Nephwracks etc are mostly the same undead with different powers (not a dozen different and conflicting creation stories).

    But then I noticed "Plane Shift: Ixalan" (a D&D supplement for MtG settings) - and the temptation is back. There's something useful in these tropes. Four factions, six races - a glance at a single art panel and you instantly can tell if you might vibe or not.

    Dragon-Blooded are Genasi with a thicker Culture. And even in 2E, I remember Lookshy having "recommended stats" to represent the military culture. And maybe that's the solution. Race not as skin-coloring and biology - but as region-specific cultural templates?


    The only obstacle I see is the scale of the map.

    Non-human races seem far-flung in Exalted - so there are few places one might find a cosmopolitan mix (maybe working for a Guild Caravan, carnival-style? half-divine offspring of some travel-god? a zoo in Yu Shan?). Or they're all human - but somehow have radically radically different cultures (enough that you can't simply strip them naked and confuse them for each other)? Ritual tattoos, scarring, something?

    Have any of you ever mulled adding fantasy races in?

    Or have you used existing mega-tropes (Beastmen, Undead, etc) to create cultures?

    Or maybe a Lookshy/Dragon-Blooded style set of "here are some base stats people from this city have - then spend X points customizing"?

    How would you do it?


    Through indiscriminate suffering men know fear and fear is the most divine emotion.
    It is the stones for altars and the beginning of wisdom.
    Half gods are worshipped in wine and flowers. Real gods require blood.
    - Their Eyes Were Watching God

  • #2
    Exalted is a very humanist setting; as in, humans are unique, interesting to the gods. We are given their divine spark because they see something in us that even they cannot attain. It's part of the entire theme and aspects of Exalted. The few other sentient races all are defined by their relations to humans--the Gods sit above in their divine affairs, so far above, yet something to be attained. The Fae are the jealous forms, despising and yet desiring what we have. The Jadeborn and Dragon Kings are what came before--something close to us, but missing that last spark that makes humanity special. Beastmen and mutants are what happens what we are twisted beyond recognition.

    That is why it is difficult to place meaningful races into Exalted. There are ways you can put the races in--beastmen and anything to do with the Fae, for example. Or just rewrite the history for your own canon--a shard of existence where humanity was not alone.

    I think the question you have to answer first with different races, more than anything, is "What narrative purpose do they serve?" I think from that flows the way to do what you want.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Salagimsim View Post

      Non-human races seem far-flung in Exalted - so there are few places one might find a cosmopolitan mix (maybe working for a Guild Caravan, carnival-style? half-divine offspring of some travel-god? a zoo in Yu Shan?).
      I'll note that this is part of why places such as Nexus, Great Forks, Chiaroscuro and... oh God I can't remember it, the new place, the Western city in the core book's opening fiction, exist. Being cosmopolitan will attract a variety of people, and so they're places in which such oddities might be found hiding in the cracks.

      ​Yu-Shan has also been written in previous Editions as a place where many of the few surviving Dragon Kings who retain their intelligence have sought refuge.


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      • #4
        Originally posted by Dragonmystic View Post
        We are given their divine spark because they see something in us that even they cannot attain.
        Like having not been given a geas to prevent attacking their enemies.


        I have approximate knowledge of many things.
        Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
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        • #5
          Exalted has humans, people with pointy ears, short people, panda people, hairy people, animal people, etc. In fact, it's got more diversity than many RPG settings. They're all still considered human though from the perspective of the setting because of one fundamental fact of the setting - non-humans (Lintha, Mountain Folk, Dragon Kings, etc) cannot Exalt and don't have an Exaltation. Which means that if you want to introduce a new non-human race and have it be playable, you sort of need to come up with a set of Charms or other supernatural abilities and mechanics so that the player doesn't get left behind by the people who are Exalted and have those supernatural abilities and mechanics.

          Honestly I like the way Exalted works, in that if someone wants to be a human with pointy ears, and cat eyes or whatever, they just describe themselves that way and you can play it off as a quirk of genetics, a wyld mutation, a demonic ancestor, or whatever.

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          • #6
            When you look closely at the playable non-humans they pretty consistently have their own equivalent to Exalts, the thing that's actually missing are mortals.


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            • #7
              Originally posted by Salagimsim View Post
              Non-Human Races - have you ever included them? How? Why?
              Yes, i did use them. A made-up underbrood race, a mash up of greys with nosferatu for visuals. A pair of them came to the surface to investigate something, but it has been a bunch of years and can't really remember right now.
              But there was some nice, goofy fun with that duo of "subterranean vampaliens" involving among other things a big, bad kaiju battle royale between a Behemoth, a Warstrider and the "inquisitors" growing to giant size with strange silver powersuits (that resembled Ultraman) amidst the streets of Nexus (Emissary had been eaten and was kind of powering the Behemoth, so could not intervene).

              Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post

              I'll note that this is part of why places such as Nexus, Great Forks, Chiaroscuro and... oh God I can't remember it, the new place, the Western city in the core book's opening fiction, exist.
              Wu-Jian, i guess.

              Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
              Being cosmopolitan will attract a variety of people, and so they're places in which such oddities might be found hiding in the cracks.
              Or even standing in plain sight as simply particularly exotic foreigner. Remember the peculiar fantastic people described in Herodotus' Histories or the Travels of Marco Polo? Not to mention those of such odd people with cosmopolitan places of their own, like the Ixcoatli Empire or Serpolet for example.

              Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
              ​Yu-Shan has also been written in previous Editions as a place where many of the few surviving Dragon Kings who retain their intelligence have sought refuge.
              Yeah, got some use out of them in a Sidereals game a few years ago in fact.

              Originally posted by Lioness View Post
              When you look closely at the playable non-humans they pretty consistently have their own equivalent to Exalts, the thing that's actually missing are mortals.
              Wouldn't quite say that. More like races like the Jadeborn, Dragon Kings and Lintha occupy a sort of middle ground between Exalt and our definition of "mortal races".

              Though those three were something like the top tier of the Primordial races, with people such as the "generic underbroods" in Scroll of Fallen Races being lower in capacity, while others such as Pelagials or Alaun were very much mortal overall. The Alaun in particular were basically smart sword-wielding Austrech with basalt castles and some thaumaturgy, at least based in the tidbits one can colate from Oadenol's Codex and CoCD:Underworld.
              Last edited by Baaldam; 04-06-2019, 04:16 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Baaldam View Post
                Wouldn't quite say that.
                ​I think she's got a point. They do carry a certain baggage from the need to constitute a society that ostensibly consists of everybody having supernatural powers.

                Originally posted by AnubisXy
                one fundamental fact of the setting - non-humans (Lintha, Mountain Folk, Dragon Kings, etc) cannot Exalt and don't have an Exaltation.


                ​Wellll, that at least applies to the existing classic Exalted. The developers have said that the Spoken were Chosen from among non-human beings among the Niobraran League.

                ​It's not really a fundamental fact so much as a marginal emergent property, in my eyes. Whether or not they can Exalt matters less to the definition of whether a Dragon King is human or not than the fact that it's a sapient dinosaur who hatched from an egg, spent the first few decades of its life as a ravenous wild animal, and as it grows older and stronger, has an increasingly sharp recollection of previous lives.

                ​Even the powers thing... the mythology of the setting holds that humans weren't subject to the geas because they were regarded as too weak to be a threat, which does establish a baseline by which the abilities of others are measured, but so long as a race can have something attributed to it that might qualify for the geas, even if it's not hugely significant, then the bigger priority is in making the species sufficiently alien in biology and the manner in which that affects outlook.

                ​And even for the powers thing... it can be plausible that there would exist other alien races in the setting apart from the designs of Primordials.

                ​Still, with the tone of how the setting is established, what there isn't necessarily room for is these beings living in societies that can be readily slotted in among humans. I'd say that there has to be a barrier of seperation, even if it's one that can be crossed for the sake of exchanges.


                I have approximate knowledge of many things.
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                • #9
                  Also please note, playable. We didn't have support for playable Lintha (save as their modern incarnation as demon blooded pirates) let alone Pelagials or Alaun.


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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post

                    ​I think she's got a point. They do carry a certain baggage from the need to constitute a society that ostensibly consists of everybody having supernatural powers.
                    True, the game did focus in those who were special and offered new options of play or as antagonists (the whole Lintha as Creation's Melniboneans coming straight from Blood & Salt, as far as i can remember, them being just mutant pirates with some Yozi worship on the side before that).

                    Originally posted by Lioness View Post
                    Also please note, playable. We didn't have support for playable Lintha (save as their modern incarnation as demon blooded pirates) let alone Pelagials or Alaun.
                    That said, what we have on the last two and others does not paint a image much different from mutants or beastmen in play potential & options. Though admitedly only so far and could certainly change if the right fancy or idea hit one of the devs.
                    Last edited by Baaldam; 04-26-2018, 10:00 PM.

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                    • #11
                      re: Mutations

                      Yes, we can have pointy ears, weird skin and other fun features in Exalted - but these do not imply nor confer a culture, values, language, traditions, norms. They're superficial. They're phenotypes, not races. Ergo, it's shallow. It's fun and useful, but boils down to being a slightly mutated human.

                      At it's core, having the same skin color (or whatever) doesn't constitute a race.

                      re: Lintha, Pelagials, Alaun, etc

                      Being playable / not-playable is a different set of problems. Even if they're just NPCs, they can be useful. I did more googling and found a compilation from Exalted:
                      • Extinct:
                        • The Alaun - bird-like people who sang Primoridal praises all day, whose ghosts now haunt the Underworld
                        • The Ereta'een - alien-like people smelted by Autochton into Soulsteel
                        • The Kyzvoi - crafted hybrids of men/scorpions/wolves whose ghosts haunt Marama's Fell
                        • The Mazriki - telepathic mantises who fed on fear who "taught the raksha much"
                        • The Scathacs - humanoid-giants of worm-colonies that Raksha loathed for their "false complexity"
                        • The Sheedai - crafted aquatic love-slaves made by a Twilight, now floating in the underworld amid murder-fish
                        • The T'Shay'I - unknown, hunted to extinction by the Dragon-Kings
                      • Survivors:
                        • Humans - weakest, numerous but geas-free (and thus favored for Exaltation)
                        • Eyeless Nation - birthed from a behemoth, exiled and now only summoned by sorcery
                        • Dragon-Kings - closest to gods by design, based off giant scaled beasts
                        • Lintha - humanoid, favored by Kimbery, essence-users
                        • Mountain Folk - born from a behemoth (Clay Man) or made by Autochton (Dwarves)
                        • Pelagials - humanoid, "beneath Lintha & Mosok, above Humans" - Yozi-worshippers who speak to a Neverborn
                        • Pineys & Chaun - two distinct races of sentient plant-people (Pineys are nice with poor memory; Chaun hostile & xenophobic)
                      • Crafted & Odd:
                        • Elemental: Air & Sea Folk, Dune Peoples (slave race), Tree Folk (eugenics), Earth Folk (bred themselves out of existence)
                        • Djala / Minikin: Another humanoid variant
                        • Hura: A "fleshy artificial race" that became "plasmic entities" after fleeing to the Underworld to escape the Usurpation. Exalts designed them. No mention if they could survive in Creation still.
                        • The Indwryth, the Exquisite Prey - deer-like creatures in Malfeas (but not demons) who make wonderful expresisons & music
                        • The Singers of the Deep - Wyld mutated humans
                        • The Unju - Birds of Burden, not properly demons. Featherless avians with manlike bodies.
                        • The Rapace - Southern ape-like-men. No word if mutant, beastman or other.
                        • Demons? "Pre-Yozi Deva races included the Gilmyne, Angyalkae and Agata"
                      The problem with most of this list..... is that they're written as extinct horrors whose tombs or ghosts you might trip across.

                      re: Narrative Purpose

                      Dragonmystic really hit it on the head.

                      I think one benefit is "narrative shorthand" - and another is "bulwark against assimilation".

                      In Exalted, someone playing a "savage barbarian" or "surly drunkard" might feel pressure to assimilate to group-norms (especially within a city) - but in D&D, if you're a Half-Orc or Dwarf and the rest are Humans or Half-Elves, there's a certain "it is what it is" because certain behaviors might be cultural, biological or both.

                      In other words, fantasy races create a sort of "social armor" for the player to stick out form the group during RP. And people can't just be upset and irrational about it. No one needs to play to stereotypes, but you're unlikely to be shocked if the Orc is violent or dumb; if the Dwarf is zealously-honor-bound and drunk; if the Gnome skulked around while the team fought on the front-line; or if a Tiefling does something unethical. In fact, the racial tropes help remind you of the differences - and you even start playing to those stereotypes (maybe assigning the Orc and Dwarf into a drunken violence spectacle (as a distraction) while the Gnome is sneaking to rob the noble who the Elf is seducing (or whatever).

                      It also helps verbalize biases. People are more comfortable saying "I hate Orcs" or "I loathe Dwarves" - I've never seen someone (even experienced players) say "I can't stand Sijanese people" or "Great Forks needs a good genocide" (okay, maybe an Abyssal group). And without going to those extremes, the point is that it gives you a solid idea. Story hooks arise. Why do you hate Orcs? Could this character be baited into a quest via word of Orc marauders? What if they saw Humans acting the way they accuse Orcs of acting? What if they met an Orc Wizard or Bard?

                      In other words, cities (and their inhabitants) aren't just backdrops for the ST to tell stories - with races, players see archetypes of those inhabitants (and are more prone to interact with those stereotypes).

                      re: Great Forks, Chiaroscuro, Wu-Jian, Nexus - and An-Teng

                      Some of these I imagined as mere "trade hubs full of diverse humans and a few beastmen or god-blooded" - yeah "diverse", but not necessarily enough for there to be races that people have stereotypes about. Nexus is the lead example I think. Wu-Jian too (almost everything described still looks human which is why Dragon-Blooded can't just spot and purge them).

                      But reconsidering some of these, Chiaroscuro and Great Forks work great.
                      • My mind's eye always pictured Great Forks as having 3 groups of people from the Scavenger Lands merging into 1 people.... but why not keep their individuality? It could be 3 truly distinct ethnic groups (different dress, customs, accents, looks, etc) each with their "main god" (of the 3) and a couple personal sub-gods.
                        • So it's still a city of a thousand gods - full of a mix of Scavenger Land mortals - but with 3 major enclaves loyal-to-each-other but committed to their distinct traditions. Maybe even mutated enough to breed true? I could steal Autochtonian mutants! So maybe Dayshield has a lesser forge-god as an attendant (whose favored mortals have smoked-skinned descendants, etc).
                      • Chiaroscuro also has 3 people. I previously thought "it's just Aladdin", but it could have Indo-Aryan Caste-system vibes.
                        • The Dead are the first generation - it's wards provide a unique way to showcase "ancient undead" as a sort of local "race"; The Warlords are the second generation, the warring peoples who previously fought for the city; The Tri-Khan are the third generation, the Iranian-inspired invaders with distinct culture and clothing. They're not as exaggerated as D&D races - but they could be portrayed distinct enough for stereotypes.
                      The Sweet Spot seems to be An-Teng.
                      • The Dragon-Blooded are obviously distinct culturally.
                      • The Families - instead of blurring them into "locals" - should divide into the 3 Princes influence.
                        • Shadow-Puppeteers? shadow-magic
                        • Elephant-Riding Ghost Generals? more Heroic mortals / heroes
                        • Animal-Commanding Masks? maybe famaily mascots/pets
                      • Serpent Men - 2E mentions beastmen, "more man than serpent" now, confused for god-bloods
                      • Silver Crowned - 2E had an insular, hair bleached white, wearing steel jewelry
                      • Seven Stranded Vine Heirs - not merely a cult, they have heirs of the original royal lineages..... inbreeding + demonic influence.... so they might make a distinct ethnicity with mutations (without revealing they're actually a Yozi cult of course - use another excuse)
                      • God-Blooded & Ghost-Blooded & Kaleyi - all 3 tucked into the local religion
                      PLUS
                      • WEST: Lintha ? Pelagials ? Singers of the Deep ? Sea Folk ?
                      • SOUTH: Dune People ?
                      • SHADOWLANDS: Hura ?
                      • OTHER: Djala ? Dragon-King?
                      In other words, An-Teng is mostly human - but culturally split (and rigid) enough that you could differentiate them into much stronger stereotypes. This doesn't mean turning them into Orcs and Elves and Dwarves. But give each ethnic group slightly different garb and accents - maybe mutations or phenotypes - and it quickly splits into the "racial shorthand" that might be useful.


                      Through indiscriminate suffering men know fear and fear is the most divine emotion.
                      It is the stones for altars and the beginning of wisdom.
                      Half gods are worshipped in wine and flowers. Real gods require blood.
                      - Their Eyes Were Watching God

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                      • #12
                        So, I'm going to sidestep the idea of using fantasy races to encourage what reads to me as racist characters, for the purpose of questioning that racism. Briefly, those story hooks exist without orcs, dwarves, and elves and are more effective when there isn't this weird combination of culture and biology that a lot of DnD settings employ(I have lengthy problems with DnD's presentation of 'race' as a biologically distinct classification, with bearing on phyiscal, mental, and social capabillities.)

                        Rather, for narrative, what purpose does a race serve? Orcs, in Tolkien, exist to give the legions of evil minions who aren't men and are therefore acceptable to kill on mass (and even then, tolkien was uncomfortable with the notion for years). Why can't the race just be humans?

                        Also, on Nexus: Culturally diverse areas have stereotypes. Different cultures, when they meet, do have stereotypes of each other, even without mutation. Racial and ethnic stereotypes aren't even entirely dependant on apperance.

                        To more intreasting points: Serpentmen are, I believe, beastmen. For purposes of exalted, beastmen are metaphyiscally human (capable of exaltation).
                        Daja are human, just odd skin tone.
                        the current devs have mentioned that non-demon inhabitants as fauna of Malfeas are unlikely. Exquiste prey will probably be demons.
                        "
                        • The Mazriki - telepathic mantises who fed on fear who "taught the raksha much"
                        • The Scathacs - humanoid-giants of worm-colonies that Raksha loathed for their "false complexity"
                        • The Sheedai - crafted aquatic love-slaves made by a Twilight, now floating in the underworld amid murder-fish
                        • The T'Shay'I " Do you have a book for these? I'm curious.


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                        • #13
                          I enjoy your response, Epee - even though I land on the opposite end of the spectrum! =)
                          • Non-human races side-step real-life baggage.

                            I work with a director who loathes magical realism and fantasy - even if a film sells well, he can't grasp why. And I stress - over and over - that fantasy is good because it is divorced from real-life preconceptions. Do a realistic play with realistic people and viewers will insert their own real-life experiences into the story.

                            But add Orcs or Gnomes or Golems? - that's new. Preconceptions and stereotypes have to go out the window. And then you can have a conversation about real-world social problems without the knee-jerk: "you can't say that about Dwarves!" or "this is a negative stereotype about Goblins!" or "are you saying Elves don't have problems?"​ Marvel uses Mutants as stand-ins for issues of race, gender, etc and it works wonderfully because it's unexpected when the fantasy-lessons line-up to real-life relevance.
                            .
                          • Non-human races shouldn't always be the centerpiece

                            I get what you mean about differences among humans. I can discern a Cuban, Puerto Rican and Dominican - a Columbian vs Venezuelan - a Mexican vs Honduran - a Jamaican vs Haitian - a Lebanese vs Omani. I love my city even if most Americans see "uh, Latino" or "White?" or "Black!"

                            But the typical English-speaker won't see those differences - and it'll be difficult for the ST to portray it - let alone for players to then grasp it. So why deliberately avoid a useful tool?

                            So Orcs serve a purpose in LOTR that Humans never could. Because as humans (in the theater) viewing the enemy from the perspective of humans (on the battlefield), one glance at the Orcs and you know they're not-of-your-tribe. Games like Warcraft have 8 Troll, 5 Elf and a half-dozen splinter variants - all related - but the typical lvl 15 Human will only see "Trolls = Bad, Night Elves = Friend, Blood Elves = uh.... badish?". The cultural and biological evolution of the Troll-Elven species is irrelevant to a story about "Warcraft" or "Battle for Azeroth", etc.

                            Have you played the Elder Scrolls? Humans have 4+ distinct races - elves have more,etc - and each mechanical set of racial bonuses helps explain culture (Nords in the cold; Bretons using spells; Imperials being diplomats/charmers, etc).
                            .
                          • Non-human races serve as useful shorthand

                            I've had couple (and thankfully no more) unfortunate Exalted games where - since "we're all human, we're all Solars" - we eventually concluded with some variant of the "Lawful Stupid" Zenith smites the morally dubious Night/Twilight/Eclipse Castemate. Heresy "offends most" when it resembles your own default faith/assumptions (in this case, the Zenith's player believed all Solars were virtuous heroes - so "something was clearly wrong" with characters who didn't honor that trope).

                            Conversely, I've had these situations dodged in D&D. You hear something like "we don't allow Tieflings because...." or "my Paladin hates Tieflings" (and then you can play something else - or explain why the Tiefling should be an exception because... yadda yadda).

                            And if approved, it eliminates the presumption that "we look alike, therefore we think alike".

                            So my Tiefling was approved - another went Half-Orc - the rest either Human or Half-Elf? Great! No one was ever upset OOC when the Orc was spectacularly violent - nor surprised when I was scheming. Instead of being held to human-standards of behavior, we were eternally the foreigners, so they judged us as such (even embracing the Orc as someone to send to combat - as opposed to a "maniac human" who needs to be less aggressive).
                          RE: SERPENTMEN
                          Yes, they're entirely Beastmen - just more humanoid than average. It was a pleasant find (I deeply loathe the Silver Pact / barbarian-savage cliche, so seeing Beastmen used as allusions to Nüwa and/or nāgas from which "the Khmer people descend" is dope).

                          Maybe I could steal from Black Panther (5 tribes, each with a vague animal theme, but as "toned down" as the Serpentmen that they're not obviously beastmen - make the associations seem more abstract). Hmm.

                          DJALA
                          Skin Color, Longevity, Small, Enlightened Essence - human - but really, most of the Crafted Race descriptions read like Histories. They're useful but feel dry. I want to know their culture, norms, gods - not their Usurpation-era legal status changes. I've never felt how to use them.

                          HELL-FAUNA
                          Good to know!


                          OTHERS:
                          Graceful Wicked Masques, pg 22 :
                          For similar reasons and a host of others, none of the early sentient races of Creation appealed for very long to the raksha. The alaun were too devoted to their Primordial masters and too willing to sacrifice their desires in pursuit of their masters’ favor. The scathacs intrigued the raksha, but only until the raksha revealed the false complexity of a scathac mind as just a morass of competing lesser desires deriving from each scathac’s component selves. The appetites of the mazriki seemed promising and taught the raksha much, but the mazriki’s palates were too depressingly narrow to be worth the raksha’s attention. The will of the t’shay’i burned brightest of all, but the Dragon Kings all too rapidly hunted them to extinction. With each flare of interest and subsequent disappointment, the raksha turned away from Creation as best they could and returned their attention to their own desires. At least there, in the Wyld, their desires could not disappoint.

                          So with a grain of salt.

                          The others seem to (mostly) be from the Underworld compass.
                          Last edited by Salagimsim; 04-27-2018, 02:47 AM.


                          Through indiscriminate suffering men know fear and fear is the most divine emotion.
                          It is the stones for altars and the beginning of wisdom.
                          Half gods are worshipped in wine and flowers. Real gods require blood.
                          - Their Eyes Were Watching God

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Baaldam View Post
                            That said, what we have on the last two and others does not paint a image much different from mutants or beastmen in play potential & options. Though admitedly only so far and could certainly change if the right fancy or idea hit one of the devs.
                            Sorry, I was tired last night and I didn't parse what I meant very well.

                            I think it's very likely that if the Pelagials or Alaun were ever fleshed out to the degree that the Dragon Kings or Mountain Folk were let alone made playable they'd probably end up with a special class that served the overall function of Exalts. In the case of Pelagials I've previously speculated those might be their Dead Princes who could function a bit like the D&D Demilich and potentially be pretty impressive enemies for embalmed corpses. Not particularly appealing to humans but that's not thinking like a Pelagial.

                            As to the future, I know Lea is pretty against Star Trek style "bumpy forehead aliens" in Exalted and I believe that in the Ask The Developers thread the Lintha have been noted to be the result of a Primordial mingling her blood with humans rather than an entirely different species.
                            Last edited by Lioness; 04-27-2018, 04:00 AM.


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                            • #15
                              Well I tried importing Thedas, the Dragon Age setting, into Exalted so it exists elsewhere on inverted cardinal directions to Creation (so secret paths say East in Creation will Bring you to the West of Thedas and the North of Creation could bring you to the South of Thedas) upon the back of a lost Primordial The Fade whose Fetiche Soul is the Golden City Turned Black. So I played with how to do them in the Exalted setting so Dwarves are a civilization descended from the Mountainfolk/Human Godblooded. Elves are descended from the Raksha/Gods, and the Qunari are Primordial Race tied to Dragons somehow, which there I have as corporeal forms of Devas.

                              But I also include Moogles from Final Fantasy in the Form of the Kupo, mostly in the proportions you see in FF12. They are an extinct race that was pretty much genocided during the Primordial War, but some still exist as living dreams, or in stasis awakening in the Time of Tumult. I have it their souls naturally materialize into Magicite a rare magical material that is crystalline rather then the smelted soulsteel of men. They develop along a double job caste system where they develop a primary Career and a secondary Career which defines it more both broadening and narrowing their roles. They can develop Merits based on these, comparable to say the supernatural merits of Sorcerers or simple charms.

                              I also have the Bangaa which which I have using an inverted soul structure to humans in their Po is the main soul and the Hun is the lesser one. I have the Nu Mou and Seeq also existing but haven't really got to introduce them and still working on their soul mechanics. Probably something simple for the Seeq,and mysterious for the Nu Mou. I also have the Shumi, from FF8, that are pacifist spiritualists who were made by the primordial to be constantly evolving and reincarnating. Basically their soul has the capacity to transform into the soul of another depending on their nature, so they could reincarnate as a human or even a Dragon King's immortal soul, or the innocent Godsouled Moomba.

                              I also include the Krogan from Mass Effect, as basically having a redundant soul structure of two heart souls and four lower souls.

                              I have other unique species I've made, like an Underdark race called the Arthax that evolved after some of the subcaste species died off other castes replaced it. Different castes have different souls based on Ren (True Name), Shadow, Heart, and Memory.

                              I've played around with the idea of a Deviant civilization of Darkbrood that basically are an amalgamation of multiple extinct and mutated species that now result in each generation being a different species then their parents or siblings.


                              It is a time for great deeds!

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