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  • marin
    started a topic Exalted Dev Diary

    Exalted Dev Diary

    Blog post here.

    The devs tease the contents of Lunars: Fangs at the Gate, reveal the full title of Exigents, and announce a new book.

  • Sunder the Gold
    replied
    Based on scenes from the movie and videos of real centipedes, I’m guessing Centipede Style will look like a venomous Tiger Style. A brutal, rush-down, head-on approach in contrast to Snake’s graceful evasion and quick strikes.

    Centipedes use their many legs to rush and tackle their prey with great speed and force. After they latch on with their poisonous claws, they use the leverage of their long bodies and many legs to hold, lift, slam, and flip their prey to render them helpless to escape or counter-grapple, all while continuing to tear at them with venomous claws.

    The Centipede Stylist in the movie attacked with confusing and fast movements that were hard to evade, and would clinch his victims with one arm to deliver deadly strikes with the other. He could also render a victim prone and barrage them with kicks to keep them down.

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  • Sunder the Gold
    replied
    Anyone else thinking that Swaying Grass Style could make for an excellent supplement to a combat build which normally needs to use both hands for a weapon?

    By weaponizing your feet, you can switch up your approach without having to drop or exchange what you're holding in your hands.

    The Second Edition version also featured a capstone Charm that rewarded fighting to musical accompaniment, which can create synergies with a Silver-Voiced Nightingale Stylist.

    Which will just be even more awesome if Fangs at the Gate features a Performance-oriented sorcery initiation with shaping rituals for singing, instruments, and dancing. Perhaps also an initiation merit for emulating the Swan Songs of Symphogear by casting spells with your health levels.
    Last edited by Sunder the Gold; 06-10-2018, 02:52 PM.

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  • The Wizard of Oz
    replied
    Yeah, you're right.

    I think I kind of expected them to take away his rape-camps and insanity, but still have him as someone who wants to take vengeance on the Realm.
    So that's what I kind of assume his is, so I forgot that he's not.

    No, re-reading it I agree with you.
    "He will
    occasionally trade rumors or choice bits of magical plunder
    with respectful envoys from the Silver Pact, and has at
    times consented to take younger Lunars under his guidance
    for a year or two—but for the most part, he maintains
    his solitude."

    That seems like someone who is either not part of the Silver Pact, or is only a very nominal member.

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  • The Wizard of Oz
    replied
    That is quite possible. I will go and re-read it.

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  • Isator Levi
    replied
    Originally posted by The Wizard of Oz View Post
    True, but as the Silver Pact is devoted to the destruction of the Realm (and is not a highly-organised society with a set of strict rules, that therefore Ma-Ha-Suchi might be too extreme for), Ma-Ha-Suchi seems like an obvious member.
    Is my mind playing tricks on me for remembering a time when you realised that you'd misrembered what he was like in the new core?

    Because this statement definitely feels like it's based off of Second Edition Ma-Ha-Suchi.

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  • The Wizard of Oz
    replied
    True, but as the Silver Pact is devoted to the destruction of the Realm (and is not a highly-organised society with a set of strict rules, that therefore Ma-Ha-Suchi might be too extreme for), Ma-Ha-Suchi seems like an obvious member.

    I'd think Raksi would be a better candidate for "powerful Lunar Elder who's not part of the Silver Pact". Or someone new.
    Either way, someone who's primary focus is something other than fighting the Realm. That could be many things, from learning arcane secrets to simply ruling their own society.

    Leave a comment:


  • Isator Levi
    replied
    I'll admit to a bit of disappointment in Ma-Ha-Suchi being described as a major figure of the Silver Pact. It's not a deal breaker or anything, but it definitely would have been interesting to have an ancient, powerful and venerated Lunar specifically not be a member.

    Leave a comment:


  • Therian
    replied
    Originally posted by Lioness View Post
    Yeah in Scavenger Sons the Syndics were sinister figures who exiled two dozen people a year to certain death and would resort to snatching innocent people if they were behind on the quota and allies of the Realm who wouldn't shelter Solars. It's impressive how much of that changed in Bastions of the North.
    From the 3e corebook description it sounds as though they may be returning to this version.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lioness
    replied
    Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
    ​I feel as though this constitutes an argument for not identifying the Syndics with those gods specifically.
    Yeah in Scavenger Sons the Syndics were sinister figures who exiled two dozen people a year to certain death and would resort to snatching innocent people if they were behind on the quota and allies of the Realm who wouldn't shelter Solars. It's impressive how much of that changed in Bastions of the North.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Wizard of Oz
    replied
    Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
    I thought the situation in previous editions was that the Bronze Faction was advising the Empress against conquest of Whitewall, because the Syndics were threatening the Health, Peace, and Luck of the Realm as leverage.
    That's what I thought too.

    ​In light of that, a free Whitewall could be a matter of something regarded as a target for the future, whereas for the time being it's strong enough to not be worth the energy expended in taking it.

    I can definitely see that, and Gem as well.

    You've got areas that are pretty easy for the Realm to support an invasion of because they're next to the coast: Chiaroscoro, An-Teng, Wu-Jian, Cherak, Paragon, Jiara, Thorns, Marukan, Medo, Varang, Cherak, etc.

    And most of those have already been conquered, though a few places have managed to fight off the Realm again and again thanks to magical help (for example, Marukan, thanks to its alliance with Lookshy).

    Then you've got places that are hard but not impossible for the Realm to reach with a properly-supported invasion, as they're deeper into the Threshold but still within striking distance of somewhere the Realm already controls: Greyfalls, Whitewall, Gem, Wavecrest, Linowan, Coral, the Saltspire League, Ember, Fajad, etc.
    They've managed to conquer a few of these (Greyfalls, Wavecrest, Fajad, etc), but tend to have less control over them than the places nearer the Realm (Fajad is a Satrapy, but they can't take on the Anathema who may live in the tower; Linowan was in previous editions an ally rather than a Satrapy).

    Then you've got places that are so deep in the Threshold that supporting an invasion is just really not feasible. For example, to conquer the Haslanti League they'd have to either send ships through leagues of frozen sea, or across a massive frozen wilderness. To conquer Mahalanka, they'd need to send an army through huge jungles where two-thirds of them would die of disease.

    The last ones the Realm doesn't really consider; the second set are potential future targets. The sort of place that Realm generals wargamed invasions of. And some ambitious house leaders might be planning such an expedition to prove their house's fitness for leadership, or acquire resources. But, with the Houses consolidating their forces, the Legions are already finding it difficult to keep control of what they already have.
    I can definitely see there being a number of furious generals with whole invasion plans for places in the middle-threshold ready and waiting to go, only to find that the Deliberative just won't let them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Isator Levi
    replied
    Originally posted by The Wizard of Oz View Post
    Whereas attacking somewhere like Gem or the Saltspire League requires them to march deep into the wilderness away from their easy supply lines.
    ​For Gem, at least, a plausible alternative might be to sail down the coast and cross the mountains. Not exactly easy, but possibly less hard than extending power along the Diamond Road.

    ​Mind, that's the kind of target that I would think of largely in terms of an ambitious new authority in the Realm trying to consolidate power via a new wave of conquests with.

    Originally posted by glamourweaver
    I thought the situation in previous editions was that the Bronze Faction was advising the Empress against conquest of Whitewall, because the Syndics were threatening the Health, Peace, and Luck of the Realm as leverage.


    ​I feel as though this constitutes an argument for not identifying the Syndics with those gods specifically.

    ​One thing that What Fire Has Wrought gave me an impression of is that the imperialism of the Realm is in a somewhat more dynamic state than it was in prior Editions; there's still room for new satrapies to be acquired, in addition to having neighbouring powers that engage in the kind of warfare that provides business to the military Great Houses. Probably not as dramatically expansionistic as the empires of the Southeast, but enough to lend some scenarios of ongoing conquest.

    ​In light of that, a free Whitewall could be a matter of something regarded as a target for the future, whereas for the time being it's strong enough to not be worth the energy expended in taking it.

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  • BrilliantRain
    replied
    Originally posted by Prometheus878 View Post

    That may have been unintentional hyperbole due to inference from statements like this:



    Emphasis mine.

    I would not be surprised if the true number were somewhere between a quarter and half the world's population, but still.
    I'm pretty sure that the Realm's definition of civilized and OUR definition of civilized don't actually match, so there is likely a good chunk of the map and the world's population that doesn't bow before the Realm and has things like steel even if the Realm would consider them barbarians. Much like China and England each considered the other backwards and uncivilized during the early 1800s.
    Last edited by BrilliantRain; 06-07-2018, 11:27 PM.

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  • BrilliantRain
    replied
    Originally posted by The Wizard of Oz View Post

    Having read the dev diary yesterday, I was thinking about what I would like to see in this book, and what I really thought was more stuff in the diagonal areas. There's the whole new Dreaming Sea region, which has a fair amount of detail in the book (and, in the case of Prasad, in the DB and Realm previews), but also the Cinder Coast, which just has a little info in the book, and the North-East as well. I would like to see more stuff for those two areas.
    (And then there's the North-West, but I suppose most of that is just blank water? There's Fajad and Wu-Jian I guess, if you count those as North-West rather than North and West respectively)

    So anyway, that sounds good to me.


    Oh please yes. I already have two books that tell me about Gethsemene, Whitewall and the Haslanti League, I wouldn't buy a third one.

    With the ones that you're doing again, is your intention to write them again, but better/more detailed/more 3rd ed style/with a different emphasis, or actually change them significantly?


    Yeah, the 3rd ed Core is full of this stuff and its great. The only book that really did it in 2nd ed was part of Compass: North. But it really makes me much more interested in running a game in places.
    I never wanted to run a game in Gem previously, because it was an isolated city in the middle of the desert. But now it's in the middle of a collection of city-states (there's the one with the giant library, the one with the talking lions, the one haunted with demons, etc) and tribes.
    Not only that of course, but a lot of an area's internal influences and cultures are related to what's near them. You couldn't write a book with, say, medieval England as a setting, without mentioning France, Scotland, Jerusalem and Rome.



    One last note: the thing I was most happy in the Dev Diary about, honestly, was that they're going to work on Heirs to the Shogunate after Lunars. I was a bit nervous about people pledging so much that the Devs had an enormous extra Dragonblood book to write before Lunars. I mean, don't get me wrong, I would like a big extra Dragonblood book (and did pledge for it in the end), but I'd like Lunars first.


    Yeah, the revamped Gem was one of my favorite writeups in 3e, largely because of the neighbors and additional context. I used it as my model when I built my chunk of the setting for the 3e game I'm running.

    Hearing that we're basically gonna get a whole book like that is very very cool.
    Last edited by BrilliantRain; 06-07-2018, 11:29 PM.

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  • glamourweaver
    replied
    I thought the situation in previous editions was that the Bronze Faction was advising the Empress against conquest of Whitewall, because the Syndics were threatening the Health, Peace, and Luck of the Realm as leverage.

    Of course with the Legions under the command of the Houses now it might be much harder for Chejop to stop one of them from unknowingly breaking that understanding.

    Leave a comment:

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