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  • How would you rate each direction by fertility?

    i mean in relative terms, not absolute(which would be grossly unfair to the west) I really such at geography. For instance, Is the northern part of the south supposed to be more fertile than the scavenger lands?

  • #2
    I think the East is always going to be the relatively most fertile direction - the Pole of Wood is just too strong an influence for it not to be. That said, I think there are places in other directions that can probably match the fertility of places in the East. For example, I tend to picture Harbourhead and the region east of it, around the big lakes, as being similar to the Ethiopian Highlands on Earth, and those are fertile as hell. Likewise, the south coast of the big continent-peninsula that lies between the White Sea and the Inner Sea is probably pretty good farming land - it's far enough south to avoid the worst of the cold, and the sea being right there means its going to get ample rainfall.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Kelly Pedersen View Post
      I think the East is always going to be the relatively most fertile direction - the Pole of Wood is just too strong an influence for it not to be. That said, I think there are places in other directions that can probably match the fertility of places in the East. For example, I tend to picture Harbourhead and the region east of it, around the big lakes, as being similar to the Ethiopian Highlands on Earth, and those are fertile as hell. Likewise, the south coast of the big continent-peninsula that lies between the White Sea and the Inner Sea is probably pretty good farming land - it's far enough south to avoid the worst of the cold, and the sea being right there means its going to get ample rainfall.
      In general what is best for land fertility? Heat?(e.g the northern portions of the south) or rain?(scavenger lands)

      I imagine that the most fertile places of the north are something line England?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by mark View Post
        In general what is best for land fertility? Heat?(e.g the northern portions of the south) or rain?(scavenger lands)

        I imagine that the most fertile places of the north are something line England?
        I mean if we go with all the places in creation then the Blessed Isles are the most fertile place due to it being magically enhanced.
        Otherwise I'd lean more towards the northern parts of the south as it's climate is similar to Egypt.
        And Rome had to rely upon food surplus from Egypt to sustain it's population which in my mind indicates that Egypt had enough food to feed both it's citizens and Rome.
        Otherwise It's probably some place in the East that has a climate similar to china as during the mongol invasion, China apparently had cities with populations the size of Europe.

        But then again, in Exalted we do have magic to contend with as well so fertility may be stronger in those places that have a strong exalted presence as they can negotiate/coerce the local spirits into bringing bountiful harvests.


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        • #5
          Originally posted by mark View Post
          In general what is best for land fertility? Heat?(e.g the northern portions of the south) or rain?(scavenger lands)
          I'm no climatologist or soil scientist or anything, so all this is strictly a layman's understanding. But based on that, fertility is going to depend on a few factors that all play into one another. First, there's the length of the growing season - how long it stays warm enough for plants to grow at all. In Creation, the further North you go, toward the Pole of Air, the shorter this will be in general, since the cold influence of the Pole starts there earliest and lingers longest. However, this can also be influenced by local conditions. A valley, for example, can hold warm air in it, keeping it warmer than the surrounding land and giving it a longer growing season.

          The second factor is moisture. Plants need this to grow as well as warmth. It can come from rainfall, of course, but rivers and irrigation are also good sources. Egypt is a classic example of the latter. it's in the middle of the desert, and gets very little rainfall. But because the Nile River flows through it, and floods predictably and in a way that's usually easy to control, the banks of the river were some of the best agricultural land in the Mediterranean area in historical times - Egypt was basically the breadbasket of Rome when the latter ruled it.

          The final major factor is soil fertility, how much nutrients are stored in the soil and how many contaminants aren't present. Not all soils are created equal. Sand, for example, doesn't have much nutrients at all. Even biological matter that does fall on sand doesn't tend to stick to it, and gets moved away quickly. Finer-grained soils, on the other hand, tend to hold onto organic matter better, which in turn improves fertility. The nutrients in the soil can decline over time, both through farming practices, and strictly non-human ones. The farming bit is easy to understand: a plant needs nutrients to grow, and when it uses the ones in the soil, they aren't there any more, so unless something replaces them, they're gone. Nitrogen is a classic example on Earth - most plants need nitrates, nitrogen that has been "fixed" by some types of bacteria, and when they take it out of the soil, it depletes the soil's fertility. Many fertilizers that modern agriculture uses are simply nitrates, replacing the nitrogen in the soil. In earlier times, people practiced crop rotation, growing a crop in a field one year, then letting it lie fallow, i.e., not planting anything, the next year, allowing various natural processes to return nitrates to the soil. In the Middle Ages, the "three field" method of crop rotation was discovered, which involved planting a crop that used up nitrates one year, like wheat or barley, then planting another crop that actually added nitrates to the soil the next year (legumes like beans or peas are good for this), and then finally letting it lie fallow the third year so that other nutrients could return.

          Contaminants are basically the opposite of nutrients - substances in the soil whose presence inhibits plant growth, rather than promote it. Probably the most common one is salt. Salt contamination was a big problem in Mesopotamia (roughly modern-day Iraq and some surrounding areas of other countries). Agriculture in Mesopotamia made heavy use of irrigation. The problem with irrigation is that in dry climates like the Middle East, the water evaporates in the fields, leaving salt behind. Over time, this salt builds up in the soil, making it less and less fertile. Mesopotamia slowly lost fertility in its soil over the centuries this way, and they had to switch to more and more salt-tolerant but less productive crops over time.

          Egypt is also an excellent example of soil fertility. The Nile River, in addition to providing water when it floods, also deposits a good layer of silt. River silt is finer-grained than sand, and it contains a lot of biological matter, washed down from less-dry areas of Africa. So the Nile flood not only added water every year, it also enriched the soil of Egypt's farms, in a way that avoided the salt buildup that Mesopotamia suffered from.


          So, what does all this mean for Creation? Growing season I already mentioned - shortest in the North. It's probably longest in the South, and about the same across the West, Blessed Isle, and East, roughly in-between the other two. Sheltered places where warm air can collect will have longer growing seasons, as will places where the Sun is in the sky longer (so, in the North, the south side of hills or mountains, or the opposite in the South). Water is pretty common in every direction except the South. Most places outside the South will probably rely on rainfall. Rainfall does tend to come from larger bodies of water, however, so parts of Creation, particularly the East and chunks of the North, will be far enough from any large bodies of water that they'll have to rely on water from rivers instead. In the South, that will likely be the major source of water, except near the coast. Soil fertility is probably the point where Creation's magical nature will change things the most. Fertility is probably a factor of Wood Essence, rather than just chemical nutrients the way it is in our world. As such, you can expect the East, and the adjacent regions of the North and South, to have far more fertile soil naturally. But we know that contaminants can taint the soil - the River of Tears in the Northeast has a large area at its mouth in the White Sea where the salt is removed from the water, and that's tainted the land around it. So salt still has its effects. So, areas where irrigation has been done for a long time may be less fertile, even in the East.

          The Blessed Isle is notably fertile (or at least large parts of it are). This is noted as being partly the influence of the Pole of Earth, which promotes stability. From that, I think we can assume that the Blessed Isle's weather is more regular than other areas, and their soil fertility probably declines slower, and recovers more predictably than other areas of Creation.

          Originally posted by mark
          I imagine that the most fertile places of the north are something line England?
          Perhaps, though England's not the only model I'd use. I think a good chunk of the Northeast, relatively far from the coastline, is probably closer to something the Eastern European steppe (which mostly lies in the Ukraine and southern Russia) or the Great Plains of North America - relatively drier places, with hot summers and cold winters, that get a lot of their moisture from the snow melt and rivers, and have deep soil good for grain and grass growing.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Xanroth View Post
            And Rome had to rely upon food surplus from Egypt to sustain it's population which in my mind indicates that Egypt had enough food to feed both it's citizens and Rome.

            Well, the Egyptian one is most famous because it was notably abundant and the political considerations around its acquisition, but it was never the sole source of public grain. Other parts of North Africa and Sicily played their part to greater and lesser extent.

            With that in mind, I would suspect that part of the economic dynamics of the time were that Egyptian abundance being prioritised to service Rome might occasionally leave it with internal shortages, that would be made up for by importing grain from its neighbours. I think that some degree of imports might have occurred under any circumstances, and that productivity and stockpiling would never quite be uniformly distributed across the whole province at the same time.

            So sometimes it might have been a case in which, on paper, Egypt has enough for the domestic populace plus Rome, but some lower productivity sections end up giving a higher proportion, or some areas sell more to Rome than is strictly necessary for profit, and there still ended up being Egyptians who needed to get their daily bread elsewhere.

            Originally posted by Kelly Pedersen View Post
            So, what does all this mean for Creation? Growing season I already mentioned - shortest in the North. It's probably longest in the South, and about the same across the West, Blessed Isle, and East, roughly in-between the other two. Sheltered places where warm air can collect will have longer growing seasons, as will places where the Sun is in the sky longer (so, in the North, the south side of hills or mountains, or the opposite in the South). Water is pretty common in every direction except the South. Most places outside the South will probably rely on rainfall. Rainfall does tend to come from larger bodies of water, however, so parts of Creation, particularly the East and chunks of the North, will be far enough from any large bodies of water that they'll have to rely on water from rivers instead. In the South, that will likely be the major source of water, except near the coast. Soil fertility is probably the point where Creation's magical nature will change things the most. Fertility is probably a factor of Wood Essence, rather than just chemical nutrients the way it is in our world. As such, you can expect the East, and the adjacent regions of the North and South, to have far more fertile soil naturally. But we know that contaminants can taint the soil - the River of Tears in the Northeast has a large area at its mouth in the White Sea where the salt is removed from the water, and that's tainted the land around it. So salt still has its effects. So, areas where irrigation has been done for a long time may be less fertile, even in the East.

            The Blessed Isle is notably fertile (or at least large parts of it are). This is noted as being partly the influence of the Pole of Earth, which promotes stability. From that, I think we can assume that the Blessed Isle's weather is more regular than other areas, and their soil fertility probably declines slower, and recovers more predictably than other areas of Creation.
            Yes, between The Realm and Fangs at the Gate, there does seem to be a slightly stronger emphasis on select areas of the setting cultivating geomancy towards improving agricultural yields.

            As the beneficial Essence provided by such geomancy goes, my preference at this moment would be for an idea that it's one part creating a kind of metaphysical framework in which all of the necessary physical factors align and happen to come out with the greatest efficiency, and one part a nebulous spiritual quality of vitality and abundance. One might almost compare it to being Exalted, in which Essence doesn't truly substitute for the underlying physiology, but they're intertwined and interdependent.

            Hence, even in a case where the geomancy is cultivated well, good farming practices and environmental care might be necessary to ensure that everything remains in top condition, and poor maintenance of the land will diminish returns in a manner that even demesnes and gods can't override completely.

            There is an example of power that is capable of rendering even the worst landscapes abundant in defiance of pre-existing physical conditions, but as it's Solar Circle Sorcery I feel comfortable with designating such ex nihilo creations or transformations as being defined as the upper end of what Essence can achieve, replicable by only the strongest of gods and most sophisticated manses. And looking back at the description of Benediction of Archgenesis, even it speaks in terms of altering terrain into a form in which growth could logically occur rather than just having crops spring from bare rock, even if the magic is sustaining those conditions in defiance of surrounding climate and landscape.

            I'm thinking that conditions in which the growth of edible plants is truly emerging from pure Essence without any consideration for the underlying physical makeup and properties is the province of demonic Essence. I find the notion reminiscent of how the light of the Green Sun is described as being capable of causing the metal and stone of Malfeas' flesh to grow as though it were plants. From that, I'm picturing a scenario in which you could introduce the correct sorcery to something like soil that has been completely depleted of nutrients, but you're going to end up with crops of grown soil (which is probably still perfectly edible, if just kind of weird for the first generation or two, and the level of dependence one might develop on the demon or sorcery might not be a good idea).


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            • #7
              Originally posted by Kelly Pedersen View Post

              I'm no climatologist or soil scientist or anything, so all this is strictly a layman's understanding. But based on that, fertility is going to depend on a few factors that all play into one another. First, there's the length of the growing season - how long it stays warm enough for plants to grow at all. In Creation, the further North you go, toward the Pole of Air, the shorter this will be in general, since the cold influence of the Pole starts there earliest and lingers longest. However, this can also be influenced by local conditions. A valley, for example, can hold warm air in it, keeping it warmer than the surrounding land and giving it a longer growing season.

              The second factor is moisture. Plants need this to grow as well as warmth. It can come from rainfall, of course, but rivers and irrigation are also good sources. Egypt is a classic example of the latter. it's in the middle of the desert, and gets very little rainfall. But because the Nile River flows through it, and floods predictably and in a way that's usually easy to control, the banks of the river were some of the best agricultural land in the Mediterranean area in historical times - Egypt was basically the breadbasket of Rome when the latter ruled it.

              The final major factor is soil fertility, how much nutrients are stored in the soil and how many contaminants aren't present. Not all soils are created equal. Sand, for example, doesn't have much nutrients at all. Even biological matter that does fall on sand doesn't tend to stick to it, and gets moved away quickly. Finer-grained soils, on the other hand, tend to hold onto organic matter better, which in turn improves fertility. The nutrients in the soil can decline over time, both through farming practices, and strictly non-human ones. The farming bit is easy to understand: a plant needs nutrients to grow, and when it uses the ones in the soil, they aren't there any more, so unless something replaces them, they're gone. Nitrogen is a classic example on Earth - most plants need nitrates, nitrogen that has been "fixed" by some types of bacteria, and when they take it out of the soil, it depletes the soil's fertility. Many fertilizers that modern agriculture uses are simply nitrates, replacing the nitrogen in the soil. In earlier times, people practiced crop rotation, growing a crop in a field one year, then letting it lie fallow, i.e., not planting anything, the next year, allowing various natural processes to return nitrates to the soil. In the Middle Ages, the "three field" method of crop rotation was discovered, which involved planting a crop that used up nitrates one year, like wheat or barley, then planting another crop that actually added nitrates to the soil the next year (legumes like beans or peas are good for this), and then finally letting it lie fallow the third year so that other nutrients could return.

              Contaminants are basically the opposite of nutrients - substances in the soil whose presence inhibits plant growth, rather than promote it. Probably the most common one is salt. Salt contamination was a big problem in Mesopotamia (roughly modern-day Iraq and some surrounding areas of other countries). Agriculture in Mesopotamia made heavy use of irrigation. The problem with irrigation is that in dry climates like the Middle East, the water evaporates in the fields, leaving salt behind. Over time, this salt builds up in the soil, making it less and less fertile. Mesopotamia slowly lost fertility in its soil over the centuries this way, and they had to switch to more and more salt-tolerant but less productive crops over time.

              Egypt is also an excellent example of soil fertility. The Nile River, in addition to providing water when it floods, also deposits a good layer of silt. River silt is finer-grained than sand, and it contains a lot of biological matter, washed down from less-dry areas of Africa. So the Nile flood not only added water every year, it also enriched the soil of Egypt's farms, in a way that avoided the salt buildup that Mesopotamia suffered from.


              So, what does all this mean for Creation? Growing season I already mentioned - shortest in the North. It's probably longest in the South, and about the same across the West, Blessed Isle, and East, roughly in-between the other two. Sheltered places where warm air can collect will have longer growing seasons, as will places where the Sun is in the sky longer (so, in the North, the south side of hills or mountains, or the opposite in the South). Water is pretty common in every direction except the South. Most places outside the South will probably rely on rainfall. Rainfall does tend to come from larger bodies of water, however, so parts of Creation, particularly the East and chunks of the North, will be far enough from any large bodies of water that they'll have to rely on water from rivers instead. In the South, that will likely be the major source of water, except near the coast. Soil fertility is probably the point where Creation's magical nature will change things the most. Fertility is probably a factor of Wood Essence, rather than just chemical nutrients the way it is in our world. As such, you can expect the East, and the adjacent regions of the North and South, to have far more fertile soil naturally. But we know that contaminants can taint the soil - the River of Tears in the Northeast has a large area at its mouth in the White Sea where the salt is removed from the water, and that's tainted the land around it. So salt still has its effects. So, areas where irrigation has been done for a long time may be less fertile, even in the East.

              The Blessed Isle is notably fertile (or at least large parts of it are). This is noted as being partly the influence of the Pole of Earth, which promotes stability. From that, I think we can assume that the Blessed Isle's weather is more regular than other areas, and their soil fertility probably declines slower, and recovers more predictably than other areas of Creation.



              Perhaps, though England's not the only model I'd use. I think a good chunk of the Northeast, relatively far from the coastline, is probably closer to something the Eastern European steppe (which mostly lies in the Ukraine and southern Russia) or the Great Plains of North America - relatively drier places, with hot summers and cold winters, that get a lot of their moisture from the snow melt and rivers, and have deep soil good for grain and grass growing.

              Shouldn't the west and east have more water than the north and south? The former for obvious reasons the latter because i think it explicitly has more rainfalls. It's a tropical forest the more east you go.



              So maybe this ranking?
              1. The blessed island. The clue is in the name
              2. The scavenger lands. A healthy amount of rain with soil fertility.
              3. the coast of the south. Warm seasons, but not excessively so due to the sea being nearby. Modestly good fertility because it's not too far from the pole of wood. Of course regions near the east might be more fertile, but if i remember the map correctly i think that unlike real life phenomena the elemental poles probably don't work quite so scientifically
              4.The deep east. Probably way too much water, being tropical and all that, lowering fertility a bit. Also growth is probably more "wild" in this area.
              5. the coast of the north. It's cold, but moderately fertile.
              6. The west. At least i think so. No idea to be honest. Aren't islands, in general bad places for farming? Made redundant by the fact that it has lots of fish. If we include fish in our definition of fertility then the west should tie the deep east, i think
              7. The far north and deep south.

              Any thoughts/corrections?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by mark View Post


                Shouldn't the west and east have more water than the north and south? The former for obvious reasons the latter because i think it explicitly has more rainfalls. It's a tropical forest the more east you go.



                So maybe this ranking?
                1. The blessed island. The clue is in the name
                2. The scavenger lands. A healthy amount of rain with soil fertility.
                3. the coast of the south. Warm seasons, but not excessively so due to the sea being nearby. Modestly good fertility because it's not too far from the pole of wood. Of course regions near the east might be more fertile, but if i remember the map correctly i think that unlike real life phenomena the elemental poles probably don't work quite so scientifically
                4.The deep east. Probably way too much water, being tropical and all that, lowering fertility a bit. Also growth is probably more "wild" in this area.
                5. the coast of the north. It's cold, but moderately fertile.
                6. The west. At least i think so. No idea to be honest. Aren't islands, in general bad places for farming? Made redundant by the fact that it has lots of fish. If we include fish in our definition of fertility then the west should tie the deep east, i think
                7. The far north and deep south.

                Any thoughts/corrections?
                It seems Good.
                Scavenger lands and Coast of the South I'd say is pretty tied mostly due to the Coast of the South having three sources of food, cattle, farming and fishing.
                I'd switch the north and deep east just cause deep east has so many different plants fighting for every inch of soil that wheat and crops will probably be strangled by other plants.
                However, there would likely be an abundance of fruits in the east.
                However, The northern coast does have the addition of fishing and livestock, a jungle is a bad place to raise livestock.

                The West as you mentioned has fishing, but it's kind of all they have, so trade with the Blessed Isle and the mainland is pretty vital for the larger islands as expanding cities will swiftly eat up the small available patches of pastures and farms so I'm almost tempted to say that they would share a spot with far north and deep south if we go without the fish.

                Yup. far north and deep south both have it pretty rough when it comes to growing things.


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mark View Post
                  Shouldn't the west and east have more water than the north and south? The former for obvious reasons the latter because i think it explicitly has more rainfalls. It's a tropical forest the more east you go.
                  The East is forest, yes, but not universally tropical forest. I'd think that only the parts of the far East that are what we'd call "tropical" are those towards the South. Also, just because the plants in a region are what we'd think of as "tropical", it doesn't mean that they're in a rain forest. Rainfall comes from large bodies of water, or, in Creation, possibly the influence of the Pole of Water. Both are in short supply in the far East. The dense forest of the south-East might have a lot of typical rainforest plants, or it might have more dry tropical plants, like huge baobab or bodhi trees.

                  In any case, large areas of rainforest aren't, in fact, all that fertile. They appear lush, what with the large growth of trees, but if you cut those trees down and try to grow crops, you find that the soil isn't all that good. The reason for this is that heavy rainfall actually leeches nutrients out of soil - it breaks down the topsoil and carries away a lot of the organic and mineral content that plants need. Now, there are exceptions to this - there's a type of soil found in the Amazon Basin called terra preta that's actually quite fertile, and good at retaining its nutrients under the impact of heavy, frequent rain. But that actually seems to be something humans created, or at least greatly expanded, rather than a purely "natural" phenomenon.


                  Originally posted by mark
                  3. the coast of the south.
                  I'd put the coast of the north here as well. It's colder than the South coast, of course, but it should be at least as well-watered, if not better. And if the South is regularly using irrigation, they might run into that salt buildup issue I mentioned.

                  Originally posted by mark
                  4.The deep east. Probably way too much water, being tropical and all that, lowering fertility a bit. Also growth is probably more "wild" in this area.
                  ​6. The west. At least i think so. No idea to be honest. Aren't islands, in general bad places for farming? Made redundant by the fact that it has lots of fish. If we include fish in our definition of fertility then the west should tie the deep east, i think
                  I might switch these, or at least put them level with each other, depending on which parts of the East and the West you're talking about, for a few reasons. First, in the East, while terrain might be hypothetically fertile, you do have to keep in mind the effort required to clear the land. Removing large trees is no easy task, particularly when they can magically make one year of growth do for ten. Secondly, in the West, bear in mind that most of the islands we can see on the map are not "small". The main island of Wavecrest is about 500 miles long, and I'd guess about 300 miles wide, for instance. That's not much smaller than the island of Britain on Earth, where someone can go their entire lives without seeing the ocean (especially in a quasi-medieval setting), and is certainly a good agricultural region.

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                  • #10
                    The Wavecrest archipelago is volcanic, so the soil is quite fertile.

                    The Coral archipelago is supposed to be much less fertile, which is a driving basis for its conquest of neighbouring islands.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kelly Pedersen View Post

                      The East is forest, yes, but not universally tropical forest. I'd think that only the parts of the far East that are what we'd call "tropical" are those towards the South. Also, just because the plants in a region are what we'd think of as "tropical", it doesn't mean that they're in a rain forest. Rainfall comes from large bodies of water, or, in Creation, possibly the influence of the Pole of Water. Both are in short supply in the far East. The dense forest of the south-East might have a lot of typical rainforest plants, or it might have more dry tropical plants, like huge baobab or bodhi trees.

                      In any case, large areas of rainforest aren't, in fact, all that fertile. They appear lush, what with the large growth of trees, but if you cut those trees down and try to grow crops, you find that the soil isn't all that good. The reason for this is that heavy rainfall actually leeches nutrients out of soil - it breaks down the topsoil and carries away a lot of the organic and mineral content that plants need. Now, there are exceptions to this - there's a type of soil found in the Amazon Basin called terra preta that's actually quite fertile, and good at retaining its nutrients under the impact of heavy, frequent rain. But that actually seems to be something humans created, or at least greatly expanded, rather than a purely "natural" phenomenon.




                      I'd put the coast of the north here as well. It's colder than the South coast, of course, but it should be at least as well-watered, if not better. And if the South is regularly using irrigation, they might run into that salt buildup issue I mentioned.



                      I might switch these, or at least put them level with each other, depending on which parts of the East and the West you're talking about, for a few reasons. First, in the East, while terrain might be hypothetically fertile, you do have to keep in mind the effort required to clear the land. Removing large trees is no easy task, particularly when they can magically make one year of growth do for ten. Secondly, in the West, bear in mind that most of the islands we can see on the map are not "small". The main island of Wavecrest is about 500 miles long, and I'd guess about 300 miles wide, for instance. That's not much smaller than the island of Britain on Earth, where someone can go their entire lives without seeing the ocean (especially in a quasi-medieval setting), and is certainly a good agricultural region.
                      Is there any reason the the coast of the north would be better watered?

                      By deep east i was referring to the "normal" parts of the deep east. No the magical Wood pole forest. The ones equivalent to the real life amazon for instance

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mark View Post

                        Is there any reason the the coast of the north would be better watered?
                        The river that the city Amber River sits at the mouth of. Also, water runoff from all the snow.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by mark View Post
                          Is there any reason the the coast of the north would be better watered?
                          A cooler climate means that, even if the South and North get the same amount of precipitation, the North will retain more of it, rather than have it evaporate again. That means more rivers. The map doesn't really show them, but the scale of the Exalted maps are pretty huge, so they probably don't show lots of decent-sized rivers at all.

                          Originally posted by mark
                          By deep east i was referring to the "normal" parts of the deep east. No the magical Wood pole forest.
                          Yes, so was I. Everything I said applied to the non-magical section of the East - it's mostly not a rainforest, and heavily forested terrain is not automatically fertile, and takes a lot of effort to clear in any case.

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                          • #14
                            Hmm, what if the near North is marshy?


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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
                              Hmm, what if the near North is marshy?
                              I guess they'd have to use the Aztec farming technique in that case.


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