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How do you run the Fair Folk?

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  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    You know, Jack Saint recently covered Space Jam, and a bit in it reminded me of the Merrie Melodies/Looney Tunes shoutout in the 1e book.

    Especially in terms of the Nerdlucks/Monstars. They’re cartoons as much as Tweety is; one might get his teeth shot out of his head in one scene but have a full set of chompers to flash at Swackhammer when ganging up on the boss in the end. Unlike Bugs and co., however, their existence is bound up in a capitalist system where their alien theme park has to exploit their workers and maintain attractions to give them a never ending stream of customers.

    While the Looney Tunes’ strength is their imaginations, the Monstars’ is what they can take.
    Last edited by TheCountAlucard; 12-05-2020, 07:00 AM.

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  • Wiwuno
    replied
    I often like to imagine that they don't really have concepts like cause and effect as we understand them. Everything that happens is part of the story, nothing is "just because" to them. This is part of why Creation is so confusing sometimes. I also like to imagine that they do not have any sense of finality. To the Rakshasa nothing is ever really over the way we understand it. This feeds back into that idea i mentioned about them just playing a new character. It also colors their interactions with mortals. Not grasping what Death is to a mortal because they have never had to think about it with the same level realness that mortals have. They struggle to comprehend the finite as much as we struggle to comprehend the Infinite.

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  • Isator Levi
    replied
    I do think some of the essence of the narrative focus stuff can be kept without them being too twee and an alien quality conveyed understandably by generally having them amount to flamboyant narcissists who alternately thrive on dysfunction, a rigorous program of self-definition, or predatory behaviour.

    Bonus points if there's a sense that some of their identity and behaviour is shaped by the expectations of who they're currently attached to.

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  • Wiwuno
    replied
    I usually like to default to the "narrative obsessed" part of narrative obsessed unknowable alien. At least insofar as the interactions they have with players often ends up mattering. As such I tend to run my Fair folk as archetypes fixated on playing their part and never breaking character. Often times if the other "actors" like the PC's dont play their parts right the Fae will continue to stretch their part as far as they can. If the players pull at that character to hard the reaction can be rather violent. The part that I love to use to make them seem truly confusing and alien in mindset is what happens when they are "killed". If not slain in the right way my Fae will often eventually come back to play a new character with none of the attachments, passions, grudges, or desires of the previous "character". This became abundantly clear when my PC's wound up adopting a Fair Folk "child" that was the new character of a previous arc villian. It would occasionally drop hints to his past character and when one of my players asked about it I responded. "They are not playing that character anymore."

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  • JohnDoe244
    replied
    On a high level, I back that 100%. Raksha as cosmic, unknowable, alien entities is better than the Fish-Malk treatment that, say, Keychain of Creation gave them. I look forward to the 3E presentation of the Fair Folk as a setting threat.

    But on a practical "how do I use this in my game" level... I think my advice stands. How do you actually narrate them? How do you run them? How do you use them in your games? Sitting at the table, across from your players, what do you do to convey "this is one of the Fair Folk"?

    I think, fundementally, to engage the PCs, you have to use them as "people" first and "fae creatures" second. And to differentiate them from the other types of fantasy creature (which, admittedly, I don't do - I play my fae NPCs almost exactly the same as I play my ghosts, elementals, human and Exalted NPCs), you need to lean into that fae nature. I think you've given some great advice on how to do that back on page one.

    Now I'm not saying that the only way to present the fae is with Megamind-style ham and flaire -- you can certainly play that off subtly as you suggest in that post. But I'd say it's easier to be unsubtle.

    Give the players that desire to annihilate.

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  • Dex Davican
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnDoe244 View Post

    Yeah, that seems exactly right to me. Particularly because I am prone to OVER ACTING!
    I do think that one of the early inspirations for the Fair Folk in 1E: gamers so invested in their roleplay, stories, and achievements that they treat the world and other characters as mere props and NPCs. In Ex3 we'll likely be moving away from that because it deprecates them as a setting threat.

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  • JohnDoe244
    replied
    Originally posted by Braininthejar View Post

    Well, I think this is because you're an rpg player playing a noble.
    A rahska is an incomperhensible alien thing playing a noble.

    Perhaps this is the proper way to play raksha - roleplay them like rpg characters of a player prone to overacting?
    Yeah, that seems exactly right to me. Particularly because I am prone to OVER ACTING!

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  • Braininthejar
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnDoe244 View Post
    I just play them as humans.

    I'd love to say "weird humans", but, uh, let's be honest here -- weird compared to what?

    I had a beautiful noble who kept court and made many secret dealings as he unravelled the secrets to ancient Solar magic... But in play, I don't think I actually RPed him any differently to any of the human nobles.

    I mean, sure, his army was made from the nightmares of children and dragons... and he bled a thick white tree sap... and he moved not by muscle but by invisible strings of Essence that flung him around like a marionette...

    But apart from that... No different to any other noble.
    Well, I think this is because you're an rpg player playing a noble.
    A rahska is an incomperhensible alien thing playing a noble.

    Perhaps this is the proper way to play raksha - roleplay them like rpg characters of a player prone to overacting?

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  • Blackwell
    replied
    Graces were only sort of tied virtues insofar as they are the feeding maw that eats that particular Virtue, and/or they were basically the Fair Folk way of emulating virtues. My guess is that Graces probably stick around as a trait of some kind for the Castes and Charm trees to hang on even if feeding works differently.

    I absolutely loved that Ink Monkeys material on Fair Folk; the Hannya (who have already been name-dropped in 3e, so still a think) were a huge lightbulb moment for me.

    While we're on the subject of 2e Fair Folk deuterocanon, does anyone have a Scroll of Errata version that includes the Fair Folk rewrite?

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  • Isator Levi
    replied
    I've a few ideas about possible ways for Fair Folk to operate that I would convey by analogy. That is, I'm not exactly describing scenarios as they would actually play out, but things that capture some of the tone or motivation.

    I imagine a scenario in which a group of friends is walking down the street in the evening, casually chatting away to one another. A different person walks past them in the opposite direction and one of the members of the group just savagely attacks them out of nowhere. The impulse to do so didn't come out of a sense of malice or sadism but out of a kind of strange curiosity about how people would react to something so horrifying and without warning, a drive unrestricted by moral sensibilities or fear of consequence (indeed, reacting to and playing off of the consequences, whatever they be, is part of the point).

    I imagine another scenario in which a person that has a tendency to interact with events as an observer from the periphery looks upon other people's homes, the families that live in them, with a very strong desire to get into those spaces and see what makes them tick. They'd want to enter homes unknown purely for the sake of rummaging around in other people's lives; not to take things, but to look at how their possessions are arranged, what their interests are, what goes on in their private little world. But it specifically has to be a form that transgresses boundaries. It can evolve from there into an insinuation into their lives, getting oneself tangled up in their dynamic while not possessing a real personal bond to any or stake in how things turn out for them. That may ultimately involve pulling the threads to turn people in various directions, depending on what the intruder thinks about the assessment of their original scouting.

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  • Sunder the Gold
    replied
    Maybe holding a Raksha's Grace allows you to make social influence against them equal to its importance, regardless of whether the Raksha has an Intimacy that would allow the influence.

    Their Heart Grace allows you to persuade them to take Life-Changing Tasks (like a Defining Intimacy), a Major Grace allows you to persuade them as per a Major Intimacy, and a Minor Grace works like a Minor Intimacy.

    This is in addition to denying the Raksha access to any of the Grace's powers. Their Sword Grace's destructive Evocations aren't much use to them if someone else owns the Sword Grace.

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  • Dex Davican
    replied
    Yeah, I think it's enough to say, "This Fair Folk put a core piece of their identity into this object, making it into an Artifact with a neat power. Anyone who holds it has a major social advantage over that Fair Folk, and they'll scheme relentlessly to get it back."

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  • Katamari_Naneke
    replied
    Originally posted by Dex Davican View Post
    I wouldn’t worry about Graces in Ex3 unless you actually want a “Koschey’s Egg” situation. If I were a dev (and I’m not), I’d have Fair Folk need to create a Grace to maintain really broken powers and advantages, so PCs can find a clever way around those powers. Otherwise, forget ‘em.
    I mean I just wanted them as a plot device. It's true they're not strictly necessary, but it's useful as a key object to fight, scheme and maneuver over. But maybe I can just simplify it so I don't have to worry about learning Grace mechanics and trying to houserule them into 3rd edition.

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  • Dex Davican
    replied
    Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post

    The raksha Adeimantus substitutes a weakness to iron for a weakness to people that cannot read the history of his city inscribed upon his body.
    Interesting! I'm not as up-to-date on a lot of antagonist write-ups.

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  • Isator Levi
    replied
    Originally posted by Dex Davican View Post
    Hmm. Howso? Looking through their writeups in the Core, it looks like you can guess which Creatures of the Wyld are actual fae vs. Wyld-mutated monsters by whether they have the Cold Iron Bane Merit.
    The raksha Adeimantus substitutes a weakness to iron for a weakness to people that cannot read the history of his city inscribed upon his body.

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