Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ask a question, get an answer

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • dreamking89
    started a topic Ask a question, get an answer

    Ask a question, get an answer

    I'm not sure if this was in the former forums, but I feel it should be made.

    This is a forum for Exalted questions that won't necessarily take up an entire thread, but rather require one or two answers from fellow players. I imagine this would cover newbie questions on the rules, canon and whatnot, but given that Exalted is a pretty complex game I feel this is necessary.

    I'll start: What's the point of the Socialize skill? Throughout my running of Exalted, I have never run across a situation where Socialize could be used where it couldn't be easily replaced by Presence. Does anyone else have this problem?

  • Elfive
    replied
    Yeah, my take is "you look like a living bronze statue"

    Leave a comment:


  • Kelly Pedersen
    replied
    Originally posted by Braininthejar View Post
    Is Invulnerable Skin Of Bronze visible as actual metal, or can you hide it as long as you avoid squeaky floors?

    The spell description specifies that it appears as "a second skin of shining bronze", and later on in the control spell section, says "even without the spell, her skin takes on a faint bronze tint" (emphasis mine). I'd say that pretty solidly suggests that you look like you're made of bronze, as well as being bronze. Disguise could probably still cover that, but it would be required, and more difficult than some disguises.

    Leave a comment:


  • Braininthejar
    replied
    Is Invulnerable Skin Of Bronze visible as actual metal, or can you hide it as long as you avoid squeaky floors?

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Scrollreader View Post
    Here's one. Edition agnostic. Can a stomach bottle bug 'swim' through Invulnerable Skin of Bronze? Pro: It's your skin. Anti: It's Invulnerable, also bronze. I'm not sure if I like the idea of the bug poking its head out from odd places on the bronze Sorceror more or less than I like having to swallow the bug so it can work on you.
    If it's flesh, the stomach bottle bug can swim through it; it doesn't matter what the flesh is made of (so long as it's sufficiently impure).

    ​(Also those things are pretty big; the demon is a bit smaller than a human stomach.)

    Leave a comment:


  • Scrollreader
    replied
    Here's one. Edition agnostic. Can a stomach bottle bug 'swim' through Invulnerable Skin of Bronze? Pro: It's your skin. Anti: It's Invulnerable, also bronze. I'm not sure if I like the idea of the bug poking its head out from odd places on the bronze Sorceror more or less than I like having to swallow the bug so it can work on you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Accelerator
    replied
    Theres a whole lot of shit.

    Usually I just look at stuff that interests me. I tend to sometimes miss things

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
    Like, did you really think I forgot that Alchemicals use attributes instead of abilities?
    In truth, I just thought it was one of those things you hadn't gotten around to reading yet.

    ​And even if you had forgotten it, or not read it, that's okay too, y'know. I just like to try and be clear about this sort of stuff

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnDoe244
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    1e and 2e had Alchemicals who grew large enough to take on city form take on the designation of metropolis/patropolis, depending on whether they were female or male respectively.

    What’s the term for a non-binary Alchemical city?
    Seeing as the current choices are Greek for "Mother City", Greek for "Father City", and the Greeks worshiped a non-binary god, "Hermapolis" probably seems right -- with Metropolis being the cultural default and Patropolis/Hermapolis being types of Metropolis. (Like "man" meaning both human beings and the male gender; all Alchemical cities are "Metropoli", but that's also the term for specifically female cities.)
    Last edited by JohnDoe244; 09-18-2020, 09:59 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Accelerator
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    Actually they use Attribute Charms, not Ability Charms.
    I get it.

    I just use the term 'bureaucracy charms' instead of 'intelligence charms' so people will know what I'm talking about.

    Like, did you really think I forgot that Alchemicals use attributes instead of abilities?

    Leave a comment:


  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
    I know that the Patropolis can have bureaucracy charms.
    Actually they use Attribute Charms, not Ability Charms.

    Leave a comment:


  • Accelerator
    replied
    Who decides what to do in a patropoli or a metropoli? Who exactly is the person taht does the day to day work. I know that the Patropolis can have bureaucracy charms. But who, exactly, is the person who decided the policy in and of itself. who is the one that decides what direction the patropolis goes in? Alchemicals don't rule. If they don't, who does?

    edit: Ok, now I see the Tripartite section. So they're... chosen at birth, by the luminors, in separate castes. And then they're stuck there. Forever. So they got the top of their caste by mostly merit.

    Is that how the government is formed? Merit in the guild analogue?
    Last edited by Accelerator; 09-18-2020, 05:36 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Accelerator
    replied
    Ok, so I got it wrong. Both decisive and withering attacks, in-character, are the same thing.

    But outside in the meta, they represent different parts of the fight; gaining the high ground, striking, trying to kill the other guy, and then decisive is actually landing a hit or landing a killing strike.

    Leave a comment:


  • armyofwhispers
    replied
    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
    Question. Decisive is basically stabbing someone. Withering attacks is parrying away their blades or pushing them off balance.

    Thus, high hardness means that someone tries to stab you straight up in the chest, the knife bounces off. High soak means that when someone feints and tries to stab you through your guard, you just let the blade bounce off your near-invincible skin, right?
    That is not at all the distinction between decisive and withering.

    From an in-character perspective, EVERY attack is an attempt to stab someone, barring gambits. The difference between withering and decisive is purely a meta thing (or a dramatic thing, but definitely not something your character knows).

    Successful withering attacks draining your target initiative to boost your own is supposed to represent gaining ground, getting a better position and and gaining advantage over your opponent. Soak is how effective your armor is in shrugging off blows or absorbing them instead of giving ground.

    Decisive attacks are different. These attacks represent attempts to end the fight. Dramatically, they are turning points in the fight. These are where combatants actually take damage. A knife in the ribs they didn't see coming, a cut that bleeds heavily, etc. They change the fight significantly. At least, you hope they do. Hardness isn't exactly a physical thing, but it kinda is. Again, it's more a meta thing that doesn't exactly map to a real world effect (it's also only provided by magic so it not mapping to an actual thing isn't all that odd).

    Leave a comment:


  • DrLoveMonkey
    replied
    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
    Question. Decisive is basically stabbing someone. Withering attacks is parrying away their blades or pushing them off balance.

    Thus, high hardness means that someone tries to stab you straight up in the chest, the knife bounces off. High soak means that when someone feints and tries to stab you through your guard, you just let the blade bounce off your near-invincible skin, right?
    Okay, so this is gonna get REAL weird here. That's not actually what's going on in-universe. Withering attacks are very often attacks intended to straight up kill their target, they don't have to be, they can be a feint, but they usually aren't. Generally when somebody makes a Withering attack they're going for a shot to kill or maim.

    Initiative is just a narrative, or I've heard the term emulative, resource. It exists because heroes in epic fantasy duels often have a lot of back and forth without anyone landing a wounding strike, until ultimately somebody lands a hit that makes the other guy bleed. Hardness exists out of universe because it's not narratively appropriate for an enemy who hasn't been winning the whole fight to land a wounding blow on somebody who's very well protected, with artifact armor or skin-hardening charms.

    The in-universe explanation is that it just bounces off your skin or armor, but the reason it doesn't work against very high initiative attacks is because it's appropriate for somebody who's been dominating the fight to wound the enemy, even through their hard skin.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X