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  • River transport, sandship, iceship, airship, warstrider rated wagon throne pulled by Elephants or Yeddims are a few possible ways too.


    “The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done.” George Carlin

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    • Originally posted by The Wizard of Oz View Post
      I found the main reason I had to do maintenance on my Warstrider was travel. You've got to walk the thing to wherever the fight is. You can't take it on Lunar-back or Stormwind Rider after all.
      That's still an average of 110 hours of walking before you put a meaningful dent in its combat performance (run out of -0 health levels). Also, I was about what you're potentially going to be getting up to right out of chargen, so the group doesn't necessarily have a group fast travel option yet (Stormwind Rider can't ferry around an average sized group until essence 2).

      Basically, the point of what I was saying is don't break your neck buying up 2-3 crafts (assuming you're using craft as-written) for something that won't have an impact for several sessions.
      Last edited by Lioness; 12-19-2018, 08:42 PM.


      The Freedom Stone is back, help it to live again.

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      • Ah, I see your point.


        "Wizard of Oz, you really are a wizard!"

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        • No! Lioness! Not another Shadowland!
          Mourning Dove

          The Eastern city of Mourning Dove has two origins both as a place and as an ideal. The ideal began shortly after the Great Contagion when three ancestor ghosts realised that with their descendants wiped out they no longer had a purpose in Creation, but yet they still yearned for and the warmth of family.
          Their collective effort lead to a new discovery that they called the Path of the Hundred-Faced Ancestor that allowed them to tap into a mortal’s unconscious mind and appear to them in the forms they most needed. By about realm year 300 the three ghosts were aggressively pursued by Sijanese Exorcists for their numerous acts of fraud and depriving the rightful ancestors of their due.
          Brought back to Sijan, they faced the Mortician’s Order and in light of their unique gifts and a compromise was struck in which they would no longer wander and instead people in need of seeing a relative’s face again would come to them.
          They established themselves in a Shadowland known to the locals as The Banquet of Crows that had formed after a brutal battle within a great pine forest. The three ghosts assumed their new identity as the Psychopomps.

          Culture:
          The core of Mourning Dove’s population are descended from the Forest Tribes who lived in and around the pine forests but it’s not uncommon for a person who visits the Psychopomps to choose to stay. There seems to be an element of matchmaking that’s aided in this, almost everyone in Mourning Dove knows a couple that met because of their influence.
          The nature of the Psychopomps doesn’t just lead to an influx of people, there are always those who violently reject such influence upon their lives and though Mourning Dove doesn’t officially exile anyone, it can make people very unwelcome if they can’t appreciate the purpose of the city.
          The Psychopomp don’t really rule anything, they spend most of their time as someone else and so leadership of the city falls to their expansive priesthood with a singular high priest and priestess presiding over the cult.

          Economics:
          People travel from far and wide to meet with the three Psychopomps and though the ghosts have never charged for their services, many of these individuals are sometimes very affluent and willing to perform feats of charity that could earn them a visitation.
          Though the white-robed priesthood of the Psychopomp is a common calling very few serve that role full-time, day to day work in Mourning Dove is mostly based around the pine forests as a source of food and lumber.

          Cuisine:
          Pine Trees were once the source of nearly all of the food in Mourning Dove and once helped to stave off famine but elements of this old diet still persist as street food. Pine Nuts are roasted as a snack, while strips of tree bark are deep fried in butter as part of a meal that the people of Mourning Dove are often at a loss to explain the popularity of. Meat is often Pork or Venison served on bread buns or as part of a warming stew.

          Spirituality and the Afterlife:
          The original Psychopomps who once roamed have long since found the fulfilment they sought and found Lethe, the nature of becoming a Psychopomp makes it difficult to determine how many times a particular mantle has shifted hands.

          The three figures have a rough identity even though sex and apparent age are in flux, they are known to their worshipers simply as Past, Present and Future. It is commonly believed they are bound to those roles, but in reality each of the three is capable of appearing as a long dead relative, powerful illusions and feats of divination. It’s very rare to actually meet with one of the three rather than receive a vision or visitation from a dead loved one that conveys some greater message.

          Mourning Dove itself views death as something fundamentally about moving forwards, while the ghosts of its people do sometimes linger after death they do little to interfere with the running of the city. It is widely believed that these ghosts are the source of new Psychopomps. The barely understood nature of the patrons helps strengthen belief, they’re much more than ghosts who moliate themselves to make people happy. The people who meet with them frequently swear that they really did set out to meet the one they came to see.

          Festival Days:
          Epiphany: Taking place at the end of autumn, this was once the end of the year for the forest tribes that now inhabit the city believing that the world died and would be reborn again. The particulars of that belief have changed but it remains a time of reflection when visits from the Psychopomps are most likely to occur.

          Calibration: Though not officially their new year Mourning Dove gets an unusually high number of visitors during Calibration. There are a number of factors that account for this, the onset of a new year has a way of making people introspective and the strange nature of Calibration can help a reunion with a deceased loved one seem less unnatural.

          Military:
          The white-robed priests are charged with the defence of the city and its people, this primarily takes the form of warding and exorcisms when something stirs deep within The Banquet of Crows. They also deal with more mundane matters of security and serve as a city watch to deal with criminal matters and militia when the city faces an external enemy. The saying of the priesthood is that Mourning Dove has no enemies, but the city’s outer wall tells a somewhat different story.
          The Psychopomps do a lot to prevent external threats as enemy soldiers are plagued with terrifying nightmares but their existence is also a source of potential military threats. Occasionally an individual of wealth and power dislikes how their visitation went or is denied one entirely because the Psychopomps saw something in their motives that troubled them.
          As Mourning Dove’s reputation grows, the Psychopomps may one day anger someone powerful enough to sunder down the walls of their beloved city.
          In Game:
          The PCs are visiting Mourning Dove as part of a Christmas special.



          The Freedom Stone is back, help it to live again.

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          • The emotional journey I just went on is indescribable, but perhaps I could publish it as a novella and adapt it to a number of other media.


            But sexually.

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            • Originally posted by Ellis View Post
              The emotional journey I just went on is indescribable, but perhaps I could publish it as a novella and adapt it to a number of other media.
              Your signature makes that even funnier.


              “The very existence of flame-throwers proves that some time, somewhere, someone said to themselves, You know, I want to set those people over there on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done.” George Carlin

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              • A bit of a detour from canon here.
                Hearth


                While the Icewalkers are a nomadic people they maintain a number of locations that they can reach in a harsh northern winter or when the sea of chaos washes out over the world. Hearth is the largest and most secretive of these locations because it’s built around a man-made mountain, a towering strut of Feathersteel believed to be part of Bagrash Kol’s lost sky city.

                Culture:
                For most of the year, Hearth is occupied primarily by those Icewalkers deemed in no fit state to travel, new mothers with their children and the elderly. The tribes mostly live apart from one another in sections of the city marked by the animal skins of the various totem animals as a form of sign posting. While the Icewalkers within Hearth don’t need to fight among themselves for resources it’s generally considered improper to stray into another tribe’s part of the city without permission and doing so invites a potentially violent confrontation.
                Nevertheless despite this divide, networking among the tribes is important and necessary for the passing on of skills. The force that most transcends the tribal divisions is Hearth’s ruling body, The Mother’s Council a collection of tribal matriarchs who have built up social capital within the city and are trusted to represent their tribes.
                What has eroded the Mother’s Council in recent years is the appointment of the Bull of the North’s daughter Nessa to its ranks, because while Nessa is a peacemaker the undeniable influence of a Solar Exalted warlord gives negotiations with her an edge to them. Insinuating that she’s her father’s puppet on the council is a way to make this ordinarily collected woman rather angry.

                Economics:
                Hearth has no currency, merely a form of barter that exists between the tribes that occupy its walls. Its primary export is the precious Feathersteel mined from the strut, as well as the prebuilt forges necessary to truly work this wondrous metal. While there is no price for sheltering in Hearth a tribe often feels indebted to The Mother’s Council and these debts are not without value.
                Trade with non-Icewalkers simply doesn’t happen; Hearth’s greatest strength is its secrecy.

                Cuisine:
                Food in Hearth is primarily what animals are hunted by the tribes, the carcases are hung from hooks in strategically placed buildings that are packed with ice. The cold typically preserves this meat for a while but a bout of unseasonable heat can lead to spoilage and everything on four legs being considered a viable source of nourishment.
                There have been instances of foul play with these ice huts where a member of a rival tribe has been accused of introducing contaminated meat. The Mother’s Council maintains its own stockpile, both to discourage such a dishonourable tactic and prevent a tribe that failed to store its food properly from going on the warpath.
                Warring over food is more common than it sounds, not necessarily with the intent to wipe another tribe from existence but rather to embarrass them. Holding a feast is Hearth is an otherwise rare opportunity for a tribe demonstrates its skill and prosperity to others. A sudden cancellation could make the leader look weak or foolish.

                Spirituality:
                The location of Hearth is one of the greatest secrets of the Icewalkers and one of the forces that has historically unified the tribes as one people. There are others hardy enough to walk the plains of the frozen north, but if they don’t know of Hearth then the belief is simply that they’re not true Icewalkers.

                Festival Days:
                Hearth has no fixed calendar but the arrival of a tribe is often a time of celebration as they have typically brought ample food and supplies in order to exchange for Feathersteel.

                Military:
                For its size Hearth is relatively undefended and attempting to remain that way, however the rise of the Bull of the North and subsequent conflict with the Realm has The Mother’s Council wondering if secrecy is a viable long-term strategy or if they’ll fall victim to Dynastic reprisals. However, there are also fears of Yurgen Kaneko’s growing influence on Ice Walker culture and that allowing him to supply a standing army could see Hearth bent entirely to the will of his tribe. Even Nessa doesn’t want this, if people consider her a puppet now an action such as this would be proving them all right.

                In Game:
                The PCs visited Hearth a couple of years ago after Sator but before Belikal. One of the Lunar NPCs is an Icewalker Shaman that knew the way.
                Last edited by Lioness; 12-28-2018, 07:32 AM.


                The Freedom Stone is back, help it to live again.

                Comment

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