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First age agriculture - aztec style

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  • First age agriculture - aztec style

    Time for a lil history lesson!

    Info curtesy of Ultrafacts @ ultrafacts.tumblr.com




    How on earth would you feed a city of over 200,000 people when the land around you was a swampy lake? Seems like an impossible task, but the Aztec managed it by creating floating gardens known as chinampas, then they farmed them intensively.
    These ingenious creations were built up from the lake bed by piling layers of mud, decaying vegetation and reeds. This was a great way of recycling waste from the capital city Tenochtitlan. Each garden was framed and held together by wooden poles bound by reeds and then anchored to the lake floor with finely pruned willow trees. The Aztecs also dredged mud from the base of the canals which both kept the waterways clear and rejuvenate the nutrient levels in the gardens.
    A variety of crops were grown, most commonly maize or corn, beans, chillies, squash, tomatoes, edible greens such as quelite and amaranth. Colourful flowers were also grown, essential produce for religious festivals and ceremonies. Each plot was systematically planned, the effective use of seedbeds allowed continuous planting and harvesting of crops.
    Between each garden was a canal which enabled canoe transport. Fish and birds populated the water and were an additional source of food.

    http://blog.tepapa.govt.nz/2013/09/2...s-in-the-lake/


    ...now I know what first age agriculture looks lke.




    Malfeas F'Tagn - go check out my epic MLP/Exalted crossover "The Scroll of Exalted ponies" @ Fimfiction

  • #2
    Yeah, I can see those not only during the First Age, but also used in the Second Age in places like Ixcóatl (sorry I can't remember how they write it in Ex3), or really in any city that has a lake nearby. Nothing a mortal can't achieve really, in fact chinampas still exist nowadays.


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    • #3
      I find it more likely in the Second Age, really. In the First Age, the Exalted had the ear of all kinds of gods - they could flatter or cajole (or threaten) them into all kinds of logistical miracles that are only dreamed of by Second Age mortals, or by Second Age field gods for that matter.

      First Age agriculture probably involved magical plants that grow year-round and never deplete the soil and prevent their fruit from rotting on the vine.


      "Chicanery-No: If a player uses this Charm in an abusive or exploitative manner, the ST may punch him right in the goddamn face." --TheDementedOne

      "Happiness is very brittle and short-lived in the Exalted community, because ressentiment is our cultural touchstone." --Gayo

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      • #4
        I think the very early first Age (what 2E called the Ochre Fountain Era) quite likely had stuff like this though - IIRC it was sort of Aztec themed due to Dragon King influence.

        As for when the Solars got really established & powerful - yeah, I doubt there was even so much "agriculture" as sort of a Golden Age "the land bore forth food without need to plow or plant or weed".

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        • #5
          Yeah, I imagine a solar farmer. Just kicking the ground and crops spring up all around as far as the eye can see. Harvests per year? As many as the solar can be bothered about. Then again solars themselves were too lazy, to busy fooling around with stuff you just shouldn't fool around with etc. So normal people still had to work the fields I guess. But I still imagine a first age farmer a bit more glorious than: "Look, I made swimming mud!"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Quaint View Post
            Yeah, I imagine a solar farmer. Just kicking the ground and crops spring up all around as far as the eye can see. Harvests per year? As many as the solar can be bothered about.
            Well, this stuff is really sorcery.

            A Solar farmer using Solar Charms is going to be a supernally good farmer, but it's going to look more like magical GMOs and skilled farming techniques than a spell that turns a barren taiga into a massive grain field overnight.


            "Chicanery-No: If a player uses this Charm in an abusive or exploitative manner, the ST may punch him right in the goddamn face." --TheDementedOne

            "Happiness is very brittle and short-lived in the Exalted community, because ressentiment is our cultural touchstone." --Gayo

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            • #7
              This feels good as the kind of thing in the West.

              And why after the Usurpation, the West suddenly had more people than it could support, and hence massive amounts of piracy.

              I mean, even the continent they used to have out there... given how I picture its landscape as having been primarily designed for defence against the Fair Folk (hence why a bunch of Solar holing up there ultimately warranted such severe fighting that the place was wiped out), it would have been unsuitable to a lot of cultivation.


              I have approximate knowledge of many things.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by Isator Levi View Post
                This feels good as the kind of thing in the West.

                And why after the Usurpation, the West suddenly had more people than it could support, and hence massive amounts of piracy.

                I mean, even the continent they used to have out there... given how I picture its landscape as having been primarily designed for defence against the Fair Folk (hence why a bunch of Solar holing up there ultimately warranted such severe fighting that the place was wiped out), it would have been unsuitable to a lot of cultivation.
                Wouldn't the West have entire fisheries and agricluture, with seaweed forests, with sunken wrecks being used as hatcheries for young fish and rubble and rock being used as places where marine life can anchor to, which can be harvested for food?

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                • #9
                  These kind of "hydraulic cities" where there is actually huge amounts of agriculture in a centralized, dense urban area are a really interesting model.

                  Angkor in its prime was another - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angkor or https://www.virtualangkor.com/water-t2.

                  The more usual(?) model for huge cities in most regions is that they tend to accrue as political / trade centers, and then they grow by food imports - animal drawn trucks, canals, ships, etc - funded by taxes, services, manufacturing, etc. They're not really agricultural cities so much. (More agricultural cities through history exist more at a town like scale, though often with features of urbanism we don't associate with towns today.)

                  So there is a question about why this different model arises - advantages on being able to do dense agriculture supported by water? disadvantages on long range transport? patterns of agricultural land? etc.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
                    Wouldn't the West have
                    That post is from more than four years ago, and predates the release of Exalted Third Edition.


                    I have approximate knowledge of many things.
                    Watch me play Dark Souls III (completed)
                    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDtbr08HW8RW4jOHN881YA3yRZBV4lpYw Watch me play Breath of the Wild (updated 12/03)

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