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  • Originally posted by Accelerator View Post
    But everyone in those days uses iron.
    That's the very point. Iron, once production became possible, became a relatively common commodity whose value was in bulk, while rarer and more decorous silver then became further associated with wealth and luxury. It acquired a symbolic value that outweighed the practical virtues.
    Last edited by Greyman; 08-29-2017, 09:12 AM.

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    • Originally posted by Greyman View Post
      That's the very point. Iron, once production became possible, became a relatively common commodity whose value was in bulk, while rarer and more decorous silver then became further associated with wealth and luxury. It acquired a symbolic value that outweighed the practical virtues.
      Iron (much like pretty much everything else we take for granted) in premodern conditions is very, very, VERY difficult to produce. That drives the value up, even if it is common, relatively speaking.

      And, to be honest, it wasn't that common. The 'average' Viking Era farmstead rarely had more than 100lbs of iron goods: tools, weapons, and cooking equipment.

      http://www.hurstwic.org/history/arti...t/bog_iron.htm

      A straight sword, Resources 2, was valued in the Icelandic Sagas at a half-mark of gold. That is equal to 16 milk cows, and one milk-cow could make or break a farmstead.

      http://www.hurstwic.org/history/arti...king_sword.htm

      EDIT:

      here are some videos showing the entire ironworking process, from gathering the ore, to smelting, to refining, to forging. And, it skips out the step of fuel-making, which is a long, drawn-out process in and of itself. Charcoal was another valuable trade-good.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuCnZClWwpQ

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3rjjpuhCLI


      Last edited by Boston123; 08-29-2017, 05:24 PM.

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      • Originally posted by Boston123 View Post
        A straight sword, Resources 2, was valued in the Icelandic Sagas at a half-mark of gold. That is equal to 16 milk cows, and one milk-cow could make or break a farmstead.
        Oh, if you mean that work intensive forged-iron goods like swords are worth their weight in silver, that's a far more credible claim and I have no complaint, with the caveat that the exchange would fluctuate wildly even over relatively small distances. I thought you were talking about ingots.


        A Clutch of Dragons: Hub Thread, Presence, Resistance, Ride, Sail, Socialize Stealth, Survival, Thrown, War, First Draft pdf<NEW

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        • The Sword that is meant to be the gift of a King isn't what I would use as a standard price of a Sword... clearly not all straight Swords in Iceland were worth 16 milk cows.


          It is a time for great deeds!

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          • Call it rap, call it flyting, whatever, the most popular form of glorification among the First Age Solars was essentially poetry battles with extensive dances to shame his enemies.


            I made some MAs! PEACH: Red Locust Style, Emerald Wasp Style, Thunder on the Precipice Style, Graceful Humming Bird Style

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            • This is a pretty rough headcanon can I've only recently started developing it, but celestial elements/elementals exist, in the same way that autochthonian elements/elementals exist and orichalcum, moon silver, and star metal are the magical materials that represent them in the same way that jade represents the five that are native to Gaia, with the celestial elements being native to the celestial bodies that represent the purview of sol, Luna, and the maidens respectively, and although they are not comon in creation, huge veins of those mm ore run through those celestial bodies in the same way jade runs through creation.


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