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  • Crumplepunch
    started a topic Your Headcanon

    Your Headcanon

    Tell me about your headcanon.
    Last edited by Crumplepunch; 10-21-2015, 07:48 AM.

  • Isator Levi
    replied
    Soon enough we'll be getting official information on the functions of the Imperial Legions, but for the time being I have this notion emerging from having imagined a Lunar going for a legion's baggage train, in combination with how Fangs describes their particular standards of discipline:

    The standard procedure in the Imperial Legions is that, while the soldiers will be afforded time following a successful battle or siege to engage in plunder, they're not supposed to keep what they acquire for themselves; it's considered too risky for discipline, and having individuals burdening themselves with personal loot is damaging to legion mobility. Instead, they're meant to turn all such acquisitions over to the legion quartermasters, who'll evaluate the worth of all such remanded goods. One tenth of that value is reserved for the Empress, one fifth for the Exalted officers of the legion, and the soldier is given a promissory note for the rest. When they return to the Blessed Isle, they can turn those in to imperial officials to redeem the value of their personal pillage.

    By decree of the throne, a fund is maintained to ensure that such notes can be redeemed at the earliest possible opportunity rather than the soldiers needing to wait for the legion officials to actually liquidate them (even though when they do so, they're obligated to pay part of the profits into the fund). In this way, the soldiers are technically capable of getting more of their own share of plunder than their superiors are, since shifts in prices or lengthy sales processes can leave the ultimate actual cash value of the goods lower than the original valuation (in any case where there is such a shortfall, the difference that the legion has to pay off comes first out of the officers' share; there can even be cases where they need to make it up out of pocket). This was one of the Realm's most effective means of ensuring the dedication, loyalty and professionalism of their troops. At the same time, it ensures that no soldiers come home in possession of goods that are above their station.

    (I'm not sure if the numbers on this hold up thoroughly, but I think the idea is neat)

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  • Isator Levi
    replied
    Throughout the Realm era there have been periodic migrations of people from the far edges of Creation, whose entry keeps shaking up social dynamics as they enter established zones that have to deal with them, as well as tending to trigger a cascade of further migrations that gets felt in the Threshold.

    A significant number of these, let's say about a third, had the multiplication that caused their current territories to be too small for them triggered by exposure to the Wyld. Which is to say that, either as a result of it surging in over them or being driven to inhabit it for a while, they'd have had brief periods of things like asexual reproduction (often in the manner of anemones rather than insects, but of a more psychedelic than biological bent) or even periods of straight up cloning, in addition to the basic increase of fecundity when species compatibility and what qualifies as sex become loosened.

    Some speculate that a few such cases are actually a result of ex nihilo creation of humans from the Wyld directly.

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  • Trax
    replied
    They couldn't arm bears but everyone got two bear arms.

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  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Lioness View Post
    The artwork featuring Tramua Bear is a scene from the Ursapation, an event during the First Age in which bears briefly took over the world.
    That pun is unbearable. Just plain grizzly. Not that the bear is particularly high for koala-ty puns.
    Last edited by TheCountAlucard; 05-16-2019, 09:26 AM.

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  • Lioness
    replied
    The artwork featuring Tramua Bear is a scene from the Ursapation, an event during the First Age in which bears briefly took over the world.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kelly Pedersen
    replied
    Something I've been thinking about Zen-Mu, the titans' "home" before they came and made Creation (this is largely based on the 2e material, since there's very little about Zen-Mu, besides its existence, in 3e).

    Zen-Mu was created by the Primordials, but it was fundamentally different than Creation. In Zen-Mu, everything was created or shaped by single titans, working alone. Their creations could then interact with each other, but their natures remained unique - if you examined a plant, or animal, or piece of landscape, or unfathomable god-monster, you would be able to say firmly "this was made by Mardukth" or "that was shaped by Gaia".

    A large part of the "weariness" experienced by the Primordials, that caused them to eventually leave Zen-Mu, was an exhaustion of the creative potential inherent in each of them individually. To oversimplify, they had created everything unique it was possible to create using only their own natures.

    The great difference between Zen-Mu and Creation is that, when the Primordials decided to "settle down" and stop searching for the Shining Answer, they still lacked individual creativity, so they began to collaborate for the first time. Everything in Creation was created jointly by two or more titans (though the creative contribution could be extremely unequal). This greatly multiplied the potential things possible in Creation - it's a far more diverse place than Zen-Mu ever was. The Primordials, though, don't see this as a benefit. They're so intensely self-centered that the idea of creating something in concert with someone else always seems like something lesser to them, a cheap substitute. They all feel that they should be able to create infinitely and still be completely self-contained.
    Last edited by Kelly Pedersen; 05-15-2019, 01:08 PM.

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  • Accelerator
    replied
    headcanon. There's always some food and stuff during celebrations. My headcanon is that burning or otherwise destroying the stuff removes its material form. But everything in Creation has a 'spiritual shadow', that exists. During the rites of sacrifice, the material form is destroyed, and the spiritual form is sent to the god or spirit that the sacrifice is for.

    Different spirits have likes and dislikes. Diseases spirits love the blood of those infected by the disease they represent. Harvest gods like grains and wheat stalks. Gods of meat and cattle like animal blood and raw flesh. Gods of war like human sacrifices, weapons, or drumbeats.

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  • Alistair
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    When they're immaterial, sure, I'll accept they don't need food, water, or air when they're dematerialized. But I see no reason to believe elementals, who spend their whole life as material beings, have no need for breathing. The books had ample chance to say they didn't need it, and didn't.

    I dunno, I'd say most Air Elementals don't need it. My headcanon is that about no spirits need it, with the exception of some elementals and some weird uncategorized spirits. And not just while dematerialized, just as a thing they do (or don't do) material or not.

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  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Alistair View Post
    As well as the chapter fiction for those describing the God that Cogen fights as never having known breath until it was drawn forcibly from them. Might be just me inferring things, but I'm pretty sure they don't need to breath or perform other bodily functions that material beings do.
    When they're immaterial, sure, I'll accept they don't need food, water, or air when they're dematerialized. But I see no reason to believe elementals, who spend their whole life as material beings, have no need for breathing. The books had ample chance to say they didn't need it, and didn't.

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  • Accelerator
    replied
    Originally posted by Alistair View Post
    Essence is the breath of spirits, rendering them especially
    vulnerable to this technique.


    Air Dragon Style. As well as the chapter fiction for those describing the God that Cogen fights as never having known breath until it was drawn forcibly from them. Might be just me inferring things, but I'm pretty sure they don't need to breath or perform other bodily functions that material beings do.

    Edit: Furthermore, the Deprivation section of Survival has "Exalts and mortals both share the basic necessities of life—air, water, and food." Which does not include spirits or other beings.
    Frack it.

    This is the headcanon thread.

    Spirits, demons, elementals, gods, don't need mortal sustenance (i.e. water, food, air).

    Doesn't mean that they won't like it, though.

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  • Alistair
    replied
    Essence is the breath of spirits, rendering them especially
    vulnerable to this technique.


    Air Dragon Style. As well as the chapter fiction for those describing the God that Cogen fights as never having known breath until it was drawn forcibly from them. Might be just me inferring things, but I'm pretty sure they don't need to breath or perform other bodily functions that material beings do.

    Edit: Furthermore, the Deprivation section of Survival has "Exalts and mortals both share the basic necessities of life—air, water, and food." Which does not include spirits or other beings.
    Last edited by Alistair; 05-14-2019, 12:27 AM.

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  • TheCountAlucard
    replied
    Originally posted by Alistair View Post
    Nope, they don't
    Can you cite that? My PDF reader only found ten instances of the word “breathe” in the Ex3 Core, and of them, only one was about something not needing to breathe (and it was automatons, not spirits).

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  • Alistair
    replied
    Originally posted by Accelerator View Post

    Do spirits even need to breathe?

    Nope, they don't

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  • Accelerator
    replied
    Originally posted by TheCountAlucard View Post
    Okay, now, do air elementals die when you drown them? When you bury them alive? Can an agata hold its breath underwater indefinitely?
    Do spirits even need to breathe?

    Leave a comment:

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