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  • Crumplepunch
    started a topic Your Headcanon

    Your Headcanon

    Tell me about your headcanon.
    Last edited by Crumplepunch; 10-21-2015, 07:48 AM.

  • Caffeine Delusions
    replied
    Chejop Kejak was once known for his full and lustrous head of hair.

    That stopped the day he was briefed on Getimian Exalts.

    Leave a comment:


  • nalak42
    replied
    So prephrasing this with the fact that I mean entirely in a narrative and non-mechanical way.

    I kind of like the idea that as part of Getimian being the result of glitches in reality that some of them insist they were a different type of exalt before the world became wrong to them. Again no mechanical benefit like being able to use charms from the type they claim to have been previously,* just like some of them have the added chip on their shoulder that their old allies in the Silver Pact won't deal with them anymore or the whole now being an anathema thing.


    *Save MA where appropriate, but I mean that's just "Well Get have mastery and this character was a practitioner of Snake Style in their backstory, so they can still use the mastery version of snake style technique/charms"

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnDoe244
    replied
    Originally posted by vampire hunter D View Post
    Not all Soulsteel is the same. The stronger the souls used to create it, the higher quality of the metal. The highest quality coming from the spirits of strong Exalted.
    I don't not like this. But I'm reminded of how grave goods worked in 2E. Specfically:

    If as part of your funeral, they sacrificed a horse to you, you would get a ghost horse in the underworld.

    Yawn.

    If someone made a crappy carving of a horse for you, you would get a crappy horse carving in the underworld.

    Yawn.

    If a master artisan spent weeks labouring to make an incredibly detailed horse carving for you, rendering ever hair in perfect realism, then you would get a ghost horse in the underworld.

    Kinda interesting.

    If your kid, who had no money, no tools and no natural talent for carving, saved up for weeks to buy offcuts of wood and lovingly shaped them into an unrecognizable blob in a sincere but, but frankly futile, effort to make a horse effigy for you... then you would get the most awesome ghost horse in all existence.

    Now that interests me.

    I like the idea that "Solar souls are better", but I'd prefer if there was a more emotional aspect.

    Like, say you can make a soul-steel charm to protect people from Storm Mothers by hiding their ship in the mists of the dead. You can use any souls you like, but the souls of red-haired women downed in salt-water work better. If you use the souls of Water Aspected Dragon-Blooded then it works better still, and Eclipse Solar souls are better even than that.

    But if you ritually murder your own red-haired daughter, mercilessly beat her soul into the steel, quench the charm in her blood and bind it to your ship with her hair, then no Storm Mother can ever harm you again. Thanos and the Soul Stone style.

    2 dots (generic soul) -- Mists of the dead conceal your ship when a Storm Mother draws near
    2 dots (redhair) -- And you gain the protections of a red-haired woman
    3 dots (Water Aspect) -- And you sail with preternatural quickness, adding one Speed and Maneuverability in the mists
    4 dots (Eclipse) -- And you get Eclipse diplomatic immunity from Storm Mothers, and even if you break hospitality a Storm Mother who attacks you counts as breaking an Essence 1 Eclipse Oath; 2-3 dot powers now work against all Storm Mothers and their immediate servants, as well as any aquatic or undead being with hostile intent
    5 dots -- All of the above plus complete immunity to Storm Mothers as a perfect defense against any action a Storm Mother takes.
    Last edited by JohnDoe244; 05-24-2020, 05:58 AM.

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  • vampire hunter D
    replied
    Nevermind.
    Last edited by vampire hunter D; 05-24-2020, 09:56 AM.

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  • glamourweaver
    replied
    Coral is a matrilineal patriarchy with little concept of marriage. The patriarch of a child’s household is probably his maternal uncle, or maternal-maternal great uncle. Men have no direct responsibility for their own children, but for their sisters’ children.

    Wavecrest practices chain marriages. Every person may have two spouses, creating long chains of unions. There is rhetoric about a single “Great Chain” but that isn’t literally the case.

    The river Elidad (mentioned in major Ledaal holdings in WFHW) starts in the Fire Peaks near Gem and flows north to create a fertile delta where Lap and Chalan are located. There are kingdoms up and down the annually flooding river, which is also Gem’s major trade route to the sea and the Realm’s major route to reinforce its satrapy forces.
    Last edited by glamourweaver; 05-13-2020, 12:42 AM.

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  • Dezeroth
    replied
    I just started thinking about this a few days ago with Autochthonia, specifically the tanks holding souls in Autochthonia after Auto has devoured their po souls.

    I think it is boring to just have millions of souls chillin in a tank waiting for the 8 seals to break or a leak in the tank for them to do something. I want to see vast cities of soul steel, soul steel Alchemical cities housing the higher souls of the deceased that haven't made it into the rebirth cycle of Autochthonia and cities for those that have had their po eaten by Auto, what happens when it is discovered that higher souls can create new po souls. I'd love to explore the techno-organic lands of the dead viewed through the lens of Autochthon.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnDoe244
    replied
    The children of the Scarlet Empress (and all Lost Eggs) belong to House Scarlet until/unless they marry/get adopted into an exant Great House (like Rulinsei) or found their own Great House.

    Legally, House Scarlet is neither a Great House, nor even a Patrician house. The Empress encourages second generation children of House Scarlet be adopted into extant Great Houses, as Patrician Dragon-Blooded are adopted, through this withholding of Dynastic status (most are adopted into their father's house, the children of the Empress's sons generally belonging to their mother's house as is the norm). As the Empress's house, any adoptions require her permission and she is Matriach to the house.

    So, prior to founding her own House, V'neef would have been Scarlet V'neef.

    A noteable exception is Berit. Whilst her own children are part of House Scarlet, Berit forswears the Scarlet name as part of her belief that she is owed her own Great House.
    Last edited by JohnDoe244; 05-03-2020, 11:41 AM.

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  • HalfTangible
    replied
    In the city of Fortitude, there is a primal god within the darkness beneath the earth that is the source of the city's fatalistic ideas on inherited criminality. However, this being is more akin to a force of nature than a deity. It does not reason, it does not negotiate, it simply *is*. Such a creature cannot run the day-to-day of the surface; this falls to another god.

    That is in all due essence the headcanon, but it leaves the question open: who's the other deity?

    Answer: Urias, the Master of Chains, sees himself as the true warden of Fortitude, and continues to run it as much like a prison as he can. He has his own group of mortal followers that act as guards and jailers to the city, or at least that is what he claims. In all due truth, he is merely another gang leader granting his followers a legitimacy that they do not truly possess. Seeing every mortal in his city as an irredeemable criminal while granting those same criminals the legitimacy to police themselves is a contradiction that tears at his psyche. Spending centuries in control of a city where he is the authority over all has given him a heavily inflated sense of superiority, arrogance and self-worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Uknown DarkLord
    replied
    Whitewall and their handling of the deceased.

    So this is probably unofficial canon since while nothing in the books states how Whitewall handles their dead, it is probably the most logical choice.

    But when a person dies the family (if the deceased has family) has two days to hold funeral arrangements/viewings to mourn before the deceased's body has to be burned to ash in the city crematoriums.

    As far as the ash, the Syndics mandate that all urns have an airtight seal and latch. Urns have to be purposefully opened, if needed, by unlatching them.
    And while the Syndics are not aware of any necromantic use of ash; all ash going into urns receives a thaumaturgic treatment utilizing crushed seeds and dirt to render any necromantic uses of the ash inert.

    Leave a comment:


  • glamourweaver
    replied
    Originally posted by FallenEco View Post
    Dragonblood Aspect aren't actually connected to bloodlines, despite popular theory.
    Rather, the 'Blood of the Dragons' only passes the potential to exalt.

    The Aspect is in fact, determined more by education and personality. So while Dragonblooded lineages can favour Aspects, that has more to do with attitude and teachings of that microculture than DNA.
    That actually makes a lot of sense given...

    A) no Outcaste bloodline seems to lack the capacity of producing any given element, which you’d think they would if the aspects are genetic inheritances.

    and

    B) the Great Houses are able to maintain dominant elements despite constantly marrying in male-line blood of different Aspects. If it was genetic, dominant elements should decline and equal out with the others. But if the House culture and taught values result in dominant element, that makes sense!

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  • DrLoveMonkey
    replied
    Originally posted by habitableexoplanet View Post


    Thanks! This is still not the rules question thread though. I just find the names very evocative and want to know what they evoke.
    *Facepalm* I...thought this was "Ask a Question Get an Answer"

    Leave a comment:


  • The MG
    replied
    Originally posted by habitableexoplanet View Post
    Headcanon request: What is a "dream-curdling bow" or "horizon-cutter sword" from the cataphract description?
    Lioness provided the maybe-canon, answer; I'll give you something I came up with on the spot.

    The horizon cutter sword is a simple thing. When iron is poison to you, you cannot make steel; when you cannot make steel, you take what's readily available: distance and division. Fold them, heat them, hammer them, and you get a sword of pleasing length (longer than your enemy's, always) and sublime sharpness. The "horizon cutter" name is just poetry – the horizon is far, far to thick to be cut.

    As for the dream-curdling bow, it is an unremarkable hunting weapon, fit for small game such as rabbits, serpents, and human children. Frankly, that the cataphract brings it into battle is a sign of his arrogance.

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  • Lioness
    replied
    Originally posted by habitableexoplanet View Post


    Thanks! This is still not the rules question thread though. I just find the names very evocative and want to know what they evoke.
    I can answer the first in a 1st and 2nd edition context and speculate on the second, please be warned this is an old mechanics deep-dive.

    A Curdling-Dream Bow was a shaping weapon that could turn Gossamer (a resource Fair Folk had that represented raw dreamstuff, harvested from the wyld or potentially stolen from feeding on mortals) into bolts of essence. It was considered a weapon of the Ring Grace (Graces are like fae souls that manifest as physical objects that represents a part of them in this case a manifestation of their sense of purpose).

    There wasn't a Horizon-Cutter Sword among the shaping weapons but there was something called a Sky Barb which didn't even work in Creation (welcome to 1st and 2nd edition Fair Folk! A lot of their "weapons" were tools for how they manipulated raw chaos and asserted dominance over other fae in the Wyld but had little utility outside of it the Curdling-Dream-Bow's relatively straight forward ability to shoot gossamer as arrows was something of an outlier with impressive sounding things like "world hearts" metal eggs containing the essence of unformed potential worlds and "cosmos seeds" which were specks of perfect order found in the strata of the wyld, as unusable in most Exalted games and nowhere near as valuable as the names and descriptions would suggest) but in the wyld had the power to manipulate their surroundings and throw environmental hazards at the enemy. It was a weapon of the Sword Grace (representing the fae's bravery and lust for conflict).

    In a 1st/2nd edition context it's entirely possible these weapons are the Graces in question and stealing or destroying the Cataphract's sword could make them cowardly and the bow robbing them of a sense of purpose. If that doesn't make much sense to you I'm either A. not doing it justice or B. highlighting why Fair Folk are the splat most cited for "dear god we need to simplfiy this!"

    Leave a comment:


  • habitableexoplanet
    replied
    Originally posted by DrLoveMonkey View Post

    Well, for one, it's an artifact blade. So it has a damage and accuracy bonus equivalent of one of the 3-dot artifact wonders that the Exalted wield. Otherwise mechanically it doesn't do anything according to their writeup, but I wouldn't let that stop you from making things up if you wanted to. Like maybe the Dream Curdling Bow has an evocation that it can awaken to make a social influence roll reflexively upon landing a decisive hit with it or something.

    Thanks! This is still not the rules question thread though. I just find the names very evocative and want to know what they evoke.

    Leave a comment:

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