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Food Preservation in Creation

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  • Food Preservation in Creation

    What sort of food Preservation technology does Creation have? I know the wealthy has access to Winterbreath jars, but what about your average villager?

    I am assuming salting and curing meats happen. The north will probably dig cold cellars.

    What about the south? The Blessed Isle?

    Would canning be too modern for creation?


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  • #2
    Originally posted by wonderandawe View Post

    Would canning be too modern for creation?
    ​Yes, absolutely.

    At least one place in the South should have yakchals, I think.



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    • #3
      Most places will use the old stand-by's. Salting, curing, drying, jugging, covering it in honey, etc. Remember that salt is one of the most precious commodities in Creation for a reason.

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      • #4
        Dynasts and Patricians are probably importing large quantities of ice to keep their cellars cold. But without fast and well insulated ships, that would be a very expensive thing.

        The average person... Well. Keeping the food source alive until it is time to eat it has actually been a quite common way. And up north, they are also providing heath for the home.

        Enough far north, then there can be a few other options. There is apparently an old Sami way to produce "dry blood" by putting the blood of a reindeer into a bladder (or it might have been the stomach) and burry it (which I think was at the beginning of winter) and when they unearth it again a few month later the fluids had passed through the container. Not sure if they had to grind it as well, but the end result is a red crystallized powder, and by adding hot water it is just as blood again which they could use as a food source.
        Last edited by Lundgren; 08-22-2016, 03:25 PM. Reason: Forgot to actually adding some things for the common people :o

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        • #5
          Is it cheaper to import large quantitys of ice, or use a winterbreath jar or such.

          on Kindle Unlimited you can look up lots of books on almost anything... I've been using it to get inspiration for what life in a Garou and Kinfolk community in CWOD would be like but works well enough in exalted too.

          not sure if anyone else has it but...


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          • #6
            Originally posted by Prince of the Night View Post
            Is it cheaper to import large quantitys of ice, or use a winterbreath jar or such.
            Well... Ice can be transported and handled by mortals, and is a bit harder to fence if someone steals it. So regardless which one is cheaper, I can see the use of both.

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            • #7
              As an aside, I assume that in the Realm, they have enough magical power (bound elementals and the like) to ensure a relatively decent flow of ice (and similar creature comforts) for the Terrestrial Exalted. That's not to say that every Dragon Blooded house will have an ice box, but I imagine that most Dragon Blooded homes in or very close to major cities probably do.

              The vast majority of mortals on the Blessed Isle however will simply have to do with more mundane forms of preservation and don't get to drink their vodka on the rocks.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lundgren View Post
                Well... Ice can be transported and handled by mortals, and is a bit harder to fence if someone steals it. So regardless which one is cheaper, I can see the use of both.
                "We had them dead to rights on that ice smuggling ring but by the time we made the bust all they had was lukewarm water. Luckily unregistered water transport is also illegal thanks to House Ragara so it all worked out."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by AnubisXy View Post
                  and don't get to drink their vodka on the rocks.
                  Reminds me that alcohol is a way to preserve juice and liquid bread.

                  Hm... Do they have distilling technology? I can't recall any references to it, but I can see it fitting the setting as well as not fitting.

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                  • #10
                    I forgot about fermentation. I guess they keep kimchi, pickles and the like in barrels not jars because that would be canning.

                    I remember watching a documentary of an Inuit? group fermenting summer seabirds under rocks to eat in the winter.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lundgren View Post
                      Reminds me that alcohol is a way to preserve juice and liquid bread.

                      Hm... Do they have distilling technology? I can't recall any references to it, but I can see it fitting the setting as well as not fitting.
                      I'd imagine some places absolutely do!

                      On the other hand, it's a potentially dangerous setup with potentially toxic results, so it's very unlikely to be widespread.

                      Distilled spirits, much like imported ice, is likely going to be a sign of significant wealth in the Age of Sorrows.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wonderandawe View Post
                        I forgot about fermentation. I guess they keep kimchi, pickles and the like in barrels not jars because that would be canning.
                        It's actually called "jarring" and the process - putting things into jars and then burying them, has been practiced for thousands of years. I'm sure it's very common in Creation.

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                        • #13
                          I thought canning and jarring were the same thing? For example you use Mason Jars to "can" pickles.


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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by wonderandawe View Post
                            I remember watching a documentary of an Inuit? group fermenting summer seabirds under rocks to eat in the winter.
                            If I recall correctly, they had quite an interesting way of catching them. Sort of a ring net on a large stick.

                            When it comes to fermented food stuff that smells awful, don't forget about Hákarl (Icelandic fermented shark) and surströmming (Swedish fermented herring).

                            Scandinavia - Iceland - Greenland... I guess there is a pattern somewhere in there...

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                            • #15
                              Salting, smoking, curing, drying and the like were all universal in real life.

                              Same thing with digging cold cellars.

                              Smoking, drying and cold-storage would probably be a bit more common amongst the smallfolk because it wouldn't take a lot of resources. Salt was expensive anywhere not near the coasts.

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