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  • #31
    Originally posted by Corax View Post
    Mumbo Jumbo by Ishmael Reed. Set during the Jazz Age, it follows two Voodoo priests as they stumble upon a vast conspiracy called The Wallflower Order, an organization of monotheists descended from the Knight Templars who plan on subverting African-American culture by getting rid of dancing and jazz. I'm not kidding.

    Like Scion's 2nd edition, it imagines a secret, syncretic history of the world where gods and supernatural beings influenced history from the sidelines in a mish mash of real and imagined history. It's a great template for a pre-Visitation game focused less on divine grand feats and more on cultural and mythological exploration.

    Oh and yeah Wicked+The Divine is required reading of course.
    Yeah, those were both required reading for Scion 2e's writing staff. Good calls on both.


    Neall Raemonn Price
    Beleaguered Scion Developer

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    • #32
      I feel like the only person who has read Wicked+The Divine and didn't like it. It isn't even hating the author either, I've enjoyed both Big 2 and smaller press stuff he's done.

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      • #33
        Well, I have a few things I think about and get inspiration from when considering running a scion game.

        Investiture of the Gods which is a major work in the Shenmo genre of vernacular fiction. The interplay between mortals and immortals is how I easily imagine it working in the World of Scion, but also because my father read it to me as a child from a very old looking copy of the book in Chinese. The story about how king wen of zhou knowingly ate the entrails of his slain son (which my father made even scarier when he told me that our surname was the same as those characters, including the Chinese character) is the most memorable for me because of the high cost of life and morality in order to gain something later on.

        Mahabharata, when the Vedic people claim that all that one need read to understand the nature of existence is this book, I believe them. So many story seeds, especially related to gods, can be found in this work, if one can take the times to read all of the parvas and the various descendants and derivative works. The gambling game, even as the mundane deception that it is, can test the nature of character, the idea of honor, and the understanding of right action.

        1001 nights. As a collection of stories, the work is useful when attempting to create scenes within a session and making sure to focus on the importance of the plot over the mundane and repetitive elements of day to day living. It also has the added bonus of the heroes of the stories worshiping a monotheistic deity, but still must cope with the idea of interacting with powerful supernatural beings and magical wonders.

        Saint Seiya. This is a more recent work by Masami Kurumada. The work is interesting because it combines Greek, Japanese, and Chinese mythology and concepts. Specifically, the superficial and detail elements are greek, such as the gods, constellations, cosmos, and cloths. But the pillars of the story as well as the metaphysical elements come from the authors own understanding of his own culture. Things such as the various senses, the martial arts, the underlying principles of super moves, and the relationship gods have with the various elements of the world. Without spoiling anything a simple example would be the underworld is called hades, but functions like an Indian, Chinese, or Japanese undeworld rather than a greek one. Anyway, for a scion game that takes all myths to be true, Saint Seiya is a good example of how that can be done combining various cultural elements into a single story. It also helps that it has worldwide popularity and can be name dropped to explain to a new player.



        How can I know if what I claim I know to be true is rejecting the idea that there is something I might not know? How can I know if what I claim I don't know to be true is rejecting the idea that there is something I do know?
        -Zhuangzi

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        • #34
          Mumbo Jumbo is my favorite novel. Everything I write owes something to that book, Scion especially.


          Currently Developing you know I should probably stop updating this field, I keep accidentally announcing things early
          Crowdfund Me Tha Illiad of MC Homer: a hip hop translation of Homer's Iliad

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Ostarion View Post
            Saint Seiya.


            You need a picture altered to fit your Exalted character, or just looking for some visual inspiration? Check out the twice-reborn Exaltification thread. And here is my Deviantart page

            Søren Kierkegaard + Kim Kardashian = Brilliance

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            • #36
              Originally posted by danelsan View Post


              An encapsulation of my point. On a side note, I hope the Saint path can be used to emulate this approach because that would be pretty cool.

              Edit: I am referring to syncretic nature of the example for a saint path, but if one could actually be saint in the saint seiya style, that would be even cooler.
              Last edited by Ostarion; 05-20-2017, 09:08 PM.


              How can I know if what I claim I know to be true is rejecting the idea that there is something I might not know? How can I know if what I claim I don't know to be true is rejecting the idea that there is something I do know?
              -Zhuangzi

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              • #37
                Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                You might be thinking of the rumors surrounding Avatar the Last Airbender and first edition Exalted. Certain writers are positive it was a direct influence though they acknowledge they can't prove it.
                It's in the Wikipedia page for the second Rick Riordan series, The Lost Hero. It specifically mentions Warcraft and Scion as inspirations, but doesn't provide any citation. I also seem to recall an interview or something where it gets mentioned, but I have no idea where that might be if I'm not just imagining things.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Alpharius View Post

                  I love a lot of Marvel's stuff with Thor and the Asgardians. It often bears only the most tenuous link to actual myth, but that doesn't stop some arcs from being genuinely good stuff, especially recent Loki stuff exploring the nature of being myths. But also go give Walt Simonson's Thor stuff a read just for great material, totally 'whatever' stance towards myths aside it is gold
                  I'll second the Walt Simonson recommendation. You have no idea how thrilled I was to see that Skurge the Executioner will be in the next movie, and will be doing the twin M-16s bit. (The fact that he's being played by Karl Urban only makes this more awesomely awesome.)

                  I also rather enjoyed the Incredible Hercules series that followed World War Hulk.


                  What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                  Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by UnjustCustos View Post
                    It's mudane but the TV Outsiders has always reminded me of a group of mortals who came over with some Tuatha and tried to stick to old ways. Really want to make a Scion who comes out of that kind of environment.
                    You might consider Alex Bledsoe's "Tufa" novels, which are actually about the descendants of the Tuatha De Danaan and Fomorians after they resettled in Appalachia.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

                      I'll second the Walt Simonson recommendation. You have no idea how thrilled I was to see that Skurge the Executioner will be in the next movie, and will be doing the twin M-16s bit. (The fact that he's being played by Karl Urban only makes this more awesomely awesome.)
                      He stood alone at Gjallerbru

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                      • #41
                        I didn't see it posted earlier in the thread, but I'd also like to recommend the Gods & Monsters books from Abaddon Books. The first, Unclean Spirits, is written by Chuck Wendig, and the series follows various takes on a modern world where the gods struggle with each other like organized crime families. My favorite in the series thusfar has been Cassandra Khaw's "Rupert Wong, Cannibal Chef", which involves the ghouls, djinn, Greek furies, and the gods of the Chinese underworld.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Logos Invictus View Post
                          My favorite in the series thusfar has been Cassandra Khaw's "Rupert Wong, Cannibal Chef", which involves the ghouls, djinn, Greek furies, and the gods of the Chinese underworld.
                          That's just crazy enough to work!

                          IIRC, there is a Orson Scott Card series (the Gate Thief or something of that nature) in which all the classical gods are actually refugee families from some alternate high-magic dimension.


                          What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                          Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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