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  • Other African pantheons?

    I'd like to see more African pantheons besides just the Orishas and the Netjer, but I'm not sure which ones. The Egyptian and Yoruba gods are by far the easiest to research, but what other cultural groups do you think would work? They would have to be pantheons with a fair number of suitable beings, with information about them available. The Bantu and Igbo pantheons seem the most promising to me, but information on them is still fairly scarce. What others do you think would work?

  • #2
    The Ashanti Pantheon, the Abosom, are a really interesting West-African Pantheon. The world at large probably knows about them through Anansi, but probably don't know much about them beyond the story telling Spider. Myself and Sacerdos have actually worked at writing a Pantheon for themselves which we find entirely viable. We have done research on them, done some heavy outlining, and got some rough drafts hammered out to represent them as a Pantheon actually, and it appears that it will be entirely viable. We are going to wait for Scion Second Edition to come out so we can give them to the community in the new and shiny system, might take a bit to make the mechanics though. Houseruling Pantheons for 1e's main slowdown was doing all of the mechanics, PsPs are the bane of my existance. They are not in any presentable state at the moment however, my writing normally needs a massive amount of editing since I have some terrible writing habits that Iry fixes for me.

    They are semi-Monothesitic, with only one entity regarded as a 'Deity,' with a host of subordinate entities who draw power through that main Monotheistic entity named Nyame. Interestingly, Anansi isn't even technically even one of these subservient entities, and is not worshiped either. He can be stated out as a Divine Parent though, I'm sure, it's just an interesting little detail that he isn't actually one of the Abosom, just an enigma of an entity who hangs around in myth and folklore.

    They were born out of an idea Sacerdos and I came up with of making 'mini Pantheons,' (Mini only in that they have fewer Deities, they will still probably be pretty long) to better represent cultures that have very small, or very localized Pantheons. They will probably only have four-ish Major Deities, but a whole host of information about them otherwise. They've given us a really great experience dealing with the borderline-Monotheistic cultures, which I hope give us the tools to include other Pantheons who would normally be overlooked.

    If you want to know anything about the Abosom Wannabe, I could talk about them for sure.
    Last edited by Watcher; 06-04-2017, 06:41 PM. Reason: I'm bad at words


    Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
    The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Watcher View Post
      The Ashanti Pantheon, the Abosom, are a really interesting West-African Pantheon. The world at large probably knows about them through Anansi, but probably don't know much about them beyond the story telling Spider. Myself and Sacerdos have actually worked at writing a Pantheon for themselves which we find entirely viable. We have done research on them, done some heavy outlining, and got some rough drafts hammered out to represent them as a Pantheon actually, and it appears that it will be entirely viable. We are going to wait for Scion Second Edition to come out so we can give them to the community in the new and shiny system, might take a bit to make the mechanics though. Houseruling Pantheons for 1e's main slowdown was doing all of the mechanics, PsPs are the bane of my existance. They are not in any presentable state at the moment however, my writing normally needs a massive amount of editing since I have some terrible writing habits that Iry fixes for me.

      They are semi-Monothesitic, with only one entity regarded as a 'Deity,' with a host of subordinate entities who draw power through that main Monotheistic entity named Nyame. Interestingly, Anansi isn't even technically even one of these subservient entities, and is not worshiped either. He can be stated out as a Divine Parent though, I'm sure, it's just an interesting little detail that he isn't actually one of the Abosom, just an enigma of an entity who hangs around in myth and folklore.

      They were born out of an idea Sacerdos and I came up with of making 'mini Pantheons,' (Mini only in that they have fewer Deities, they will still probably be pretty long) to better represent cultures that have very small, or very localized Pantheons. They will probably only have four-ish Major Deities, but a whole host of information about them otherwise. They've given us a really great experience dealing with the borderline-Monotheistic cultures, which I hope give us the tools to include other Pantheons who would normally be overlooked.

      If you want to know anything about the Abosom Wannabe, I could talk about them for sure.
      What concept would you pick for their PSP, I's there any particular magic theyn perform a lot?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
        What concept would you pick for their PSP, I's there any particular magic theyn perform a lot?
        Well, they have a few systems that could be viable for a PsP for the Abosom. They do have Divine Possession, but not in any way that makes it stand out. A lot of Pantheons have Divine Possession, it's very commonplace, the Orisha, the Abosom, the Kami, and the Sgā’na Qeda’s (Haida) all have it in their cosmologies. I would probably only want to represent as a PsP if it was particularly core to their identity, which for the Abosom it isn't entirely.

        A relatively unique, and really important cosmological idea they do have though is Abosom residing within man-made objects for various reasons. (They can also reside in natural objects like rocks, trees, and animals, but the more accessible ones live in man-made objects) There are Suman which are smaller objects which have very minor, almost non-sentient Divine Entities inside of them which provide various benefits to their owner as long as their taboos are kept. Then there are larger shrines which the more minor Divine Entities reside within, such as a Divinity which looks after a specific village, which have personalities and interact with people through mediums. There are lots of variation of this sort of thing through the Ashanti religious system, enough so that I think a PsP could be made from it. I am batting around the idea that someone playing an Ashanti Scion also plays the minor Abosom in their shrine they have to carry around with them.

        This also ties into the idea of the Golden Stool, a very important Political-Religious concept and object for the Ashanti. Stools themselves have this whole host of complex details about them, but The Golden Stool specifically is endowed with the... it's not entirely clear, but almost the Abosom of the very Ashanti State itself. And when a new King is crowned, they take the soul of the Ashanti State into themselves by quickly being seated on it for a brief moment. Wars have been fought over this stool, it's very, very important. There's a slightly similar idea with the Black Stools, sort of like anchors for ancestor spirits who hang around after achieving their goal in existence and thus ceasing reincarnation.

        I am not totally sure though, maybe something else will come up, or something else will be more easily represented with the new mechanics. We will see!
        Last edited by Watcher; 06-04-2017, 08:25 PM.


        Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
        The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

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        • #5
          The Abosom sound like a great option. Inconveniently, modern Ghanaians I've met refer to the Devil as "Abonsam" …

          I'd love to do an Igbo Pantheon as part of the Afro-Atlantic confederation. They figure prominently in Puerto Rican Palo (which might also be their Pantheon's name) alongside the Orichás, and less prominently in Haitian Vodou via Gran Ibo and his nasyon. I've bugged my professors for info on them, but all the best sources on them are in Spanish.


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          • #6
            Originally posted by Lula View Post
            The Abosom sound like a great option. Inconveniently, modern Ghanaians I've met refer to the Devil as "Abonsam" …

            I'd love to do an Igbo Pantheon as part of the Afro-Atlantic confederation. They figure prominently in Puerto Rican Palo (which might also be their Pantheon's name) alongside the Orichás, and less prominently in Haitian Vodou via Gran Ibo and his nasyon. I've bugged my professors for info on them, but all the best sources on them are in Spanish.
            Oh, Lula! I actually have a question for you since you are educated on the topic of the trans-Atlantic transfer of the West African religious traditions. Do we know why the Abosom were not transferred on a scale similar to some of the other West African Pantheons? There is a folkloric presence of Anansi in Jamaica along with Owu (Brer Dead) and Osebo (Brer Tiger/Lion), but we don't see Nyame, Tano, Asase Ya or really a continuation of the religious traditions.

            My initial thought was that it could have something to do with the more... geographically static nature of some of the Ashanti traditions? It's hard to bring your Gods with you when they live in very specific objects you couldn't bring with you.


            Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
            The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Watcher View Post

              Oh, Lula! I actually have a question for you since you are educated on the topic of the trans-Atlantic transfer of the West African religious traditions. Do we know why the Abosom were not transferred on a scale similar to some of the other West African Pantheons? There is a folkloric presence of Anansi in Jamaica along with Owu (Brer Dead) and Osebo (Brer Tiger/Lion), but we don't see Nyame, Tano, Asase Ya or really a continuation of the religious traditions.

              My initial thought was that it could have something to do with the more... geographically static nature of some of the Ashanti traditions? It's hard to bring your Gods with you when they live in very specific objects you couldn't bring with you.
              I should check with Tim Burke to make sure, but I think the answer is mostly "Britain." During the era of the transatlantic slave trade, England controlled the Gold Coast and Jamaica. However, abolitionist sentiment in Britain was so strong that the British Empire abolished the slave trade to its own economic detriment out of sheer moral outrage. Slavery within the British colonies persisted a while longer, but fewer Akan people wound up on slave ships.

              Because of where they were geographically and the colonial links, I *think* those slaves were also more likely to wind up in the United States, which systematically exterminated traces of African religion and culture much more assiduously than the Caribbean and South America. Slaves had less personal freedom in the US than in the Caribbean or South America (although you were also less likely to get your arms ripped off in a sugar mill than in the West Indies), and the dominant Protestant culture overwrote African beliefs much more aggressively than the Catholics further south. The less numerous American Catholics kept trying to catechize slaves, which was not so effective when slaves were learning English as their fifth language or whatever.

              This is not to say no one from the British colonies wound up in the Americas: the regions further East, the Bights of Benin and Biafra, were hit much harder and for longer, since a) there were more locals participating on a large scale in the trade (looking at you, Dahomey), and b) they were closer to the slave trade's heartland in the Kongo-Angola region. Igbos, Yorùbás, and Dahomeans were close enough to those regions that they wound up as PoWs there and further south.


              Currently Developing you know I should probably stop updating this field, I keep accidentally announcing things early
              Crowdfund Me Tha Illiad of MC Homer: a hip hop translation of Homer's Iliad

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Lula View Post
                I should check with Tim Burke to make sure, but I think the answer is mostly "Britain." During the era of the transatlantic slave trade, England controlled the Gold Coast and Jamaica. However, abolitionist sentiment in Britain was so strong that the British Empire abolished the slave trade to its own economic detriment out of sheer moral outrage. Slavery within the British colonies persisted a while longer, but fewer Akan people wound up on slave ships.

                Because of where they were geographically and the colonial links, I *think* those slaves were also more likely to wind up in the United States, which systematically exterminated traces of African religion and culture much more assiduously than the Caribbean and South America. Slaves had less personal freedom in the US than in the Caribbean or South America (although you were also less likely to get your arms ripped off in a sugar mill than in the West Indies), and the dominant Protestant culture overwrote African beliefs much more aggressively than the Catholics further south. The less numerous American Catholics kept trying to catechize slaves, which was not so effective when slaves were learning English as their fifth language or whatever.

                This is not to say no one from the British colonies wound up in the Americas: the regions further East, the Bights of Benin and Biafra, were hit much harder and for longer, since a) there were more locals participating on a large scale in the trade (looking at you, Dahomey), and b) they were closer to the slave trade's heartland in the Kongo-Angola region. Igbos, Yorùbás, and Dahomeans were close enough to those regions that they wound up as PoWs there and further south.
                That is absolutely fascinating, I hadn't considered the differences between Protestantism and Catholithism in that situation. Thinking about it now, I know very little of Protestant interaction with non-Abrahamic faiths, I had never really considered that they would be more evangelizing, but now that I think about it, it makes absolute sense. The colonial period areas I have had experience with are the Wyandot, Haida, and Inca, all of which were interacted with mainly with Jesuits which has probably flavored my understanding quite a bit. I should look into that, I am desperately interested in the interactions between Christianity and non-Abrahamic faiths in moments of conversion, especially looking at the compromises made during conversion efforts.

                Thanks so much for that Lula! That has given me quite a bit to think about, that is really interesting!


                Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
                The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Watcher View Post

                  That is absolutely fascinating, I hadn't considered the differences between Protestantism and Catholithism in that situation. Thinking about it now, I know very little of Protestant interaction with non-Abrahamic faiths, I had never really considered that they would be more evangelizing, but now that I think about it, it makes absolute sense. The colonial period areas I have had experience with are the Wyandot, Haida, and Inca, all of which were interacted with mainly with Jesuits which has probably flavored my understanding quite a bit. I should look into that, I am desperately interested in the interactions between Christianity and non-Abrahamic faiths in moments of conversion, especially looking at the compromises made during conversion efforts.

                  Thanks so much for that Lula! That has given me quite a bit to think about, that is really interesting!
                  You're welcome! I could go on about the differences between Protestant American slave culture and Catholic Central and South American slave culture for weeks. Catholicism was typically permissive of syncretism and actively encouraged African folkways through systems like cabildos (African ethno-religious fraternities) as a way of impressing the religion on captives. North American Protestantism, on the other hand, laboriously scrubbed out as much African content as possible, so while specific practices and activities with African roots (ring shouts etc.) persisted, identifiably African figures and content fell away. This process was important to Frazier's thesis in the Herskovits-Frazier debate (although it wasn't nearly enough to carry it, as we now know).


                  Currently Developing you know I should probably stop updating this field, I keep accidentally announcing things early
                  Crowdfund Me Tha Illiad of MC Homer: a hip hop translation of Homer's Iliad

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lula View Post
                    You're welcome! I could go on about the differences between Protestant American slave culture and Catholic Central and South American slave culture for weeks. Catholicism was typically permissive of syncretism and actively encouraged African folkways through systems like cabildos (African ethno-religious fraternities) as a way of impressing the religion on captives. North American Protestantism, on the other hand, laboriously scrubbed out as much African content as possible, so while specific practices and activities with African roots (ring shouts etc.) persisted, identifiably African figures and content fell away. This process was important to Frazier's thesis in the Herskovits-Frazier debate (although it wasn't nearly enough to carry it, as we now know).
                    I have never heard of the cabildos, those sound quite interesting! My propensity for ancient history reveals itself once again. Do you have any suggestions for journal articles or books to look into on that topic of permissive syncretism in this context? It's sort of become my pet topic. Sidhe being folded into popular religion's view of Christian cosmology in the early modern period in Ireland. The honestly impressively badly done Christianization of the rural Andes resulting in animal sacrifices to saints and various Christian and local Inca/Pre-Inca Divinities being folded into the same group into the modern day. I adore seeing the ways popular religion folds together these systems, and the environments which let the population 'get away with it'.


                    Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
                    The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

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                    • #11
                      I'd love information on the Abosom, Watcher. They sound really interesting, especially considering that I was under the impression that Anansi was the only workable figure from the Ashanti religion. I look forward to seeing your write up for them for the game as well, and I'm sure I'll end up using it.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Wannabe Demon Lord View Post
                        I'd love information on the Abosom, Watcher. They sound really interesting, especially considering that I was under the impression that Anansi was the only workable figure from the Ashanti religion. I look forward to seeing your write up for them for the game as well, and I'm sure I'll end up using it.
                        I can remember Gotham By Night talking about how Anansi was the only real viable figure within the Ashanti religious system, which at first was my concern when looking into their traditional religious system. When Sacerdos and I realized that there were a whole host of Deities, though admittedly most of whom are incredibly minor or localized, it suddenly appeared to be totally viable as a Pantheon. There are four figures who are undoubtedly possible Divine Parents of enough note to be considered 'Major Divinities' (I don't say Deities or Gods here since technically only one of them is a God, and only one of them is an Abosom, it's very technical) which is good enough.

                        The first of whom, the one everyone knows, is Anansi. He serves as an object lesson in why you should be a productive member of society. Anansi is lazy, greedy, doesn't help his neighbors, and is constantly trying to challenge the will of Nyame. Anansi in most stories gets his comeuppance at the end of it. Anansi is an object lesson, "Don't ignore your neighbors when they need help because they won't help you when you need help." and, "Don't steal your own family's food because they will really not appreciate it." He does have a role as a Creation Figure, but it is rarely intentional on Anansi's part. Through his actions humans became wise, but it was because Anansi had taken all of the wisdom, shoved it in a pot, and was trying to hide it from humans. He fell off a ladder, it shattered to the world below, and it spread over humanity. He accidentally, sort of, lead Owu, Death Itself, to humanity causing humans to become mortal.

                        Anansi isn't regarded as an Abosom, not really. He is not worshiped, he does not reside within an object, location, or animal. He is this... entity who was around at the start of creation. Very powerful, capable of occasionally actually defying the will of Nyame, but not someone you would want around.

                        Since I mentioned Nyame a few times there, I'll talk about him next. Nyame is the only God in the Ashanti Pantheon. He is the Supreme Being, and all supernatural power flows through him. He gives it to Abosom, and Suman, and they can impart it to humanity. He was once very close with humanity, literally floating above their shoulders. But an old woman grinding food kept knocking Nyame in the head while doing this, and he eventually withdrew to Osoro, the Heavens. He is benevolent, and cares about humanity a great deal. He has blessed the Royal Family of England, he sent the Golden Chair to the Ashanti, and is generally a really good guy. He is incredibly distant however, and All Powerful, Omnipotent and borderline Omniscentient. (The only challenge to saying he is truly Omniscentient is some of Anansi's tricks) The only real issue Nyame has is when he created Owu, Death, he made himself mortal. Owu isn't evil though, and relies on Nyame for power, so things get along rather well.

                        Nyame was a big challenge from our perspectives since he is this huge Supreme God, and the only true God of the Pantheon in accordance to Ashanti belief. We made sure he was not the result of Abrahamic Faiths since "Omnipotent, Benevolent Supreme Sky God," rings a few bells, but there is evidence of his veneration going back far enough that he is clearly not the result of Christianization efforts, and he doesn't appear to be the result of far earlier Islamic contact. He is a really fun entity though, the Ashanti cosmology pretty much entirely benevolent due to him, short of Anansi, but he isn't really antagonistic. Witches do show up, but they're a whole 'nother sort of thing.

                        Asase Ya is a counterpart to Nyame, where he is the Sky, she is the Earth. Similar to Nyame, she is directly worshiped, which is not ordinary. She has no priests, no temples, just some shrines with herself and Nyame sharing the basic conceptual idea of these shrines. She is not an Abosom, and she is not a Goddess. But she is very powerful, very old, and worshiped. So, what can you do. She is prayed to for protection in life, and in death, since mortals enter into her body when they die. She is the creator of the Underworld, which is interesting since Nyame also is said to have created everything. Has some farming associations and taboos based on breaking soil on Thursday since it is her sacred day.

                        Lastly, for these 'Big Figures,' there is Tano. He is the greatest of the Abosom (keep in mind that Nyame, Asase Ya, and Anansi are not Abosom. Nyame is above them, Asase Ya is noted to not be a part, and Anansi just doesn't fit into any category) and is the Patron Deity of the Ashanti people. One of Nyame's sons, he is the Abosom of the Tano river, and serves as a guide to his people. We even have records of him speaking to a British Anthropologist through one of his priests at his main locus of worship. He is rather helpful, The King Within The Rock (he resides in a rock in a cave near the start of the river) and has protected humanity in several ways. The biggest is when he made a deal with Owu which resulted in only some humans who got sick dying, rather than all of them.

                        Interestingly, Tano is really misogynistic. He has a whole bunch of anti-woman taboos, and is generally regarded as not liking women when he is possessing one of his priests. This is rather out of the ordinary, and he doesn't allow his priests to ever be women. It is never explained why, which makes it a rather interesting story hook I suppose. This is not ordinary at all for the Abosom. There are some taboos that specifically target women, but Tano specifically just does not like women at all.

                        The Titan situation is probably going to be somewhat odd for them. They don't really have any antagonistic entities, as I mentioned. Nyame just... wouldn't let that happen, so, no Apep, no Fenrir, no Balor, nothing like that. The best we can come up with are two very powerful and essentially 'one-note' beings. One of the oldest Ashanti prayers, one which is frequently mentioned, mention four beings. Nyame, Asase Ya, and "The Creature That Rules the Underworld," along with, "The Lord of the Forest," which are where we found our two Titans. Owu, who is Death (Brer Dead in Jamaican folklore) and hangs out in Samando is as far as anyone can work out The Creature that Rules the Underworld. Osebo, the Leopard (you have probably heard of him called Lion, or Tiger in folklore, Mr. Nancy talks about him a few times in American Gods as Tiger) is the Lord of the Forest.

                        Then there are an absolute ton of localized, lesser Deities who could work for Divine Parents as well, but might only be able to muster a fraction of a normal entry. If I was doing them for RAW Scion 1e, I could probably only hand out two Abilities, and like one Purview/Epic for some of the really badly attested ones, simply because we just don't have their myths since they are so localized. There are a handful who could work as normal Lesser Gods though, the Ntoro Deities, sort of like local progenitor figures. Bosommuru, a large Python, or, well, an Abosom residing inside a large Python technically who explained to some mortals how to procreate, becoming their descent group's patron.
                        Last edited by Watcher; 06-05-2017, 06:30 PM.


                        Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
                        The Šiuneš, the Pantheon of the Hittite Empire, The Enduri: the Pantheon of the Manchu Peoples, The Sgā’na Qeda’s: the Pantheon of the Haida First Nation, The Abosom: The Pantheon of the Ashanti, Lebor Óe In Dea: an Expansion for the Túatha Dé Danann.

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                        • #13
                          Depending on exactly what/how that shakes out to be in the final system, "distant supreme deity" concepts like Nyame might fit as a unusually human-well-being-interested Titan or Primordial (I think was the term)


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                          • #14
                            I've mentioned wanting to see the Berber and Nubian pantheons before, though I also mentioned that they're both rather deeply entwined with the Netjer.

                            The Egyptians and the Berbers shared several major deities, such as Amun/Amon and Isis, with the Egyptians even saying that some of their gods came from Libya - this, understandably, makes it somewhat difficult to make them their own distinct pantheon. Originally I suggested giving them the same relation to the Netjer that the Loa have with the Yoruba, but now that we know pantheons can share gods this doesn't seem necessary. The sheer scale of the crossover still poses some challenges, but at this point I'd say that simply researching them would be a bigger challenge now.

                            As for the Nubian pantheon, well... the Nubians and the Egyptians had a lot of cultural crossover as well, which means that they likely shared a few deities as well. The major problem, however, comes from the 'black pharoah' era when the Nubians took over Egypt - in order to gain legitimacy/good will they swapped over to the worshipping the Netjer, which resulted in a lot of knowledge about the Nubian pantheon being lost. As it is, there are only a handful of Nubian gods that I can find any information about at all, and one of those gods has enough 'data' for me to even begin making a profile for them. So if the Nubian pantheon did appear, it would likely be very small and as some sort of 'sub pantheon' for the Netjer.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Watcher View Post

                              I can remember Gotham By Night talking about how Anansi was the only real viable figure within the Ashanti religious system, which at first was my concern when looking into their traditional religious system. When Sacerdos and I realized that there were a whole host of Deities, though admittedly most of whom are incredibly minor or localized, it suddenly appeared to be totally viable as a Pantheon. There are four figures who are undoubtedly possible Divine Parents of enough note to be considered 'Major Divinities' (I don't say Deities or Gods here since technically only one of them is a God, and only one of them is an Abosom, it's very technical) which is good enough.

                              The first of whom, the one everyone knows, is Anansi. He serves as an object lesson in why you should be a productive member of society. Anansi is lazy, greedy, doesn't help his neighbors, and is constantly trying to challenge the will of Nyame. Anansi in most stories gets his comeuppance at the end of it. Anansi is an object lesson, "Don't ignore your neighbors when they need help because they won't help you when you need help." and, "Don't steal your own family's food because they will really not appreciate it." He does have a role as a Creation Figure, but it is rarely intentional on Anansi's part. Through his actions humans became wise, but it was because Anansi had taken all of the wisdom, shoved it in a pot, and was trying to hide it from humans. He fell off a ladder, it shattered to the world below, and it spread over humanity. He accidentally, sort of, lead Owu, Death Itself, to humanity causing humans to become mortal.

                              Anansi isn't regarded as an Abosom, not really. He is not worshiped, he does not reside within an object, location, or animal. He is this... entity who was around at the start of creation. Very powerful, capable of occasionally actually defying the will of Nyame, but not someone you would want around.

                              Since I mentioned Nyame a few times there, I'll talk about him next. Nyame is the only God in the Ashanti Pantheon. He is the Supreme Being, and all supernatural power flows through him. He gives it to Abosom, and Suman, and they can impart it to humanity. He was once very close with humanity, literally floating above their shoulders. But an old woman grinding food kept knocking Nyame in the head while doing this, and he eventually withdrew to Osoro, the Heavens. He is benevolent, and cares about humanity a great deal. He has blessed the Royal Family of England, he sent the Golden Chair to the Ashanti, and is generally a really good guy. He is incredibly distant however, and All Powerful, Omnipotent and borderline Omniscentient. (The only challenge to saying he is truly Omniscentient is some of Anansi's tricks) The only real issue Nyame has is when he created Owu, Death, he made himself mortal. Owu isn't evil though, and relies on Nyame for power, so things get along rather well.

                              Nyame was a big challenge from our perspectives since he is this huge Supreme God, and the only true God of the Pantheon in accordance to Ashanti belief. We made sure he was not the result of Abrahamic Faiths since "Omnipotent, Benevolent Supreme Sky God," rings a few bells, but there is evidence of his veneration going back far enough that he is clearly not the result of Christianization efforts, and he doesn't appear to be the result of far earlier Islamic contact. He is a really fun entity though, the Ashanti cosmology pretty much entirely benevolent due to him, short of Anansi, but he isn't really antagonistic. Witches do show up, but they're a whole 'nother sort of thing.

                              Asase Ya is a counterpart to Nyame, where he is the Sky, she is the Earth. Similar to Nyame, she is directly worshiped, which is not ordinary. She has no priests, no temples, just some shrines with herself and Nyame sharing the basic conceptual idea of these shrines. She is not an Abosom, and she is not a Goddess. But she is very powerful, very old, and worshiped. So, what can you do. She is prayed to for protection in life, and in death, since mortals enter into her body when they die. She is the creator of the Underworld, which is interesting since Nyame also is said to have created everything. Has some farming associations and taboos based on breaking soil on Thursday since it is her sacred day.

                              Lastly, for these 'Big Figures,' there is Tano. He is the greatest of the Abosom (keep in mind that Nyame, Asase Ya, and Anansi are not Abosom. Nyame is above them, Asase Ya is noted to not be a part, and Anansi just doesn't fit into any category) and is the Patron Deity of the Ashanti people. One of Nyame's sons, he is the Abosom of the Tano river, and serves as a guide to his people. We even have records of him speaking to a British Anthropologist through one of his priests at his main locus of worship. He is rather helpful, The King Within The Rock (he resides in a rock in a cave near the start of the river) and has protected humanity in several ways. The biggest is when he made a deal with Owu which resulted in only some humans who got sick dying, rather than all of them.

                              Interestingly, Tano is really misogynistic. He has a whole bunch of anti-woman taboos, and is generally regarded as not liking women when he is possessing one of his priests. This is rather out of the ordinary, and he doesn't allow his priests to ever be women. It is never explained why, which makes it a rather interesting story hook I suppose. This is not ordinary at all for the Abosom. There are some taboos that specifically target women, but Tano specifically just does not like women at all.

                              The Titan situation is probably going to be somewhat odd for them. They don't really have any antagonistic entities, as I mentioned. Nyame just... wouldn't let that happen, so, no Apep, no Fenrir, no Balor, nothing like that. The best we can come up with are two very powerful and essentially 'one-note' beings. One of the oldest Ashanti prayers, one which is frequently mentioned, mention four beings. Nyame, Asase Ya, and "The Creature That Rules the Underworld," along with, "The Lord of the Forest," which are where we found our two Titans. Owu, who is Death (Brer Dead in Jamaican folklore) and hangs out in Samando is as far as anyone can work out The Creature that Rules the Underworld. Osebo, the Leopard (you have probably heard of him called Lion, or Tiger in folklore, Mr. Nancy talks about him a few times in American Gods as Tiger) is the Lord of the Forest.

                              Then there are an absolute ton of localized, lesser Deities who could work for Divine Parents as well, but might only be able to muster a fraction of a normal entry. If I was doing them for RAW Scion 1e, I could probably only hand out two Abilities, and like one Purview/Epic for some of the really badly attested ones, simply because we just don't have their myths since they are so localized. There are a handful who could work as normal Lesser Gods though, the Ntoro Deities, sort of like local progenitor figures. Bosommuru, a large Python, or, well, an Abosom residing inside a large Python technically who explained to some mortals how to procreate, becoming their descent group's patron.
                              Your research is, as always, a genuine pleasure to read.


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