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  • #16
    Originally posted by unnatural1 View Post
    Victorian England is a strong contender. Exploring what it would be like to be a Scion in the different social classes would be interesting. Imagine a super-smart Scion who could revolutionize science, but darn the luck! She's a woman, and poor at that!
    Historically, her poverty would be a bigger obstacle than her gender. There's a number of women astronomers, botanists, paleontologists, marine biologists, mathematicians, physicists, and even licensed doctors during the period. If I was doing mid-19th century Britain as a Scion setting, I'd be sorely tempted to make Mary Fairfax Somerville as Scion of Athena or some other god/dess of knowledge or learning.

    It's be kind of cool for each Pantheon to get something about it's original historical setting and then a second one that fits in which them in some way. Say, the Egyptians getting something in Ancient Egypt and then a second one either right after the Napoleonic Wars when Egyptology became a craze in Europe or in the 1920s after the discovery of King Tut's tomb.


    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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    • #17
      Either the Pax Mongolica, or maritime Southeast Asia during one of the periods when Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism are expanding into places like Indonesia and the Philippines would be my top choices.


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      • #18
        I've had this one bouncing around in my head: Bronze Age collapse and the Atlantean invasion.

        The era would be focused on Theoi, Netjer, Hittite, and Levantine scions. The Mediterranean bronze age cultures flourished for millennia, but around 1200 B.C.E., a localized series of disasters nearly destroyed civilization. It was almost Mad Max bad; massive loss of writing, learning, and infrastructure. Took centuries for the region to recover.

        How did this happen? Why, the Titans, of course. Mediterranean and Middle Eastern Titans are on record as being seriously bad news (IMMA EAT DA SUN BRUH), so the various god-monsters pooling resources and taking one last stab at annihilating their rivals and their attendant followers seems logical. Wouldn't be too hard; a few natural disasters, some plagues and the Nile flooding in the wrong season would crack the interconnected Bronze Age world like an eggshell.

        And they have the Atlanteans to finish the job.

        Plato spoke of ancient Athenians fighting off an unstoppable horde of conquerors from the island nation of Atlantis in his writings (most likely an allegory of an ideal state driving off all invaders). Accounts and archaeological evidence show battered nations being assailed by the "sea people," merciless marauders that can only be driven off by strong leaders (or so the propaganda says). That sounds like something we can work with, doesn't it?

        So. Kingdoms filled with glory and splendor being turned inside-out in the span of a few years. Chaos, mass hysteria, starvation, hardship; bonds of peace and brotherhood shattered overnight. People turn from the gods, and the gods punish. Times that try men's souls.

        Then, they come. The Atlanteans; a noble people once favored by the gods, twisted by the titans (yet noble still if you look for it). Hordes of warriors, supported by terrifying monsters, led by sorcerers and tragic, dark heroes. A war that makes the Trojan War and the battle against the giants look like a domestic dispute. The Gods' nations must weather the storm, counterattack, and sink the isle of Atlantis beneath the waves, to be lost to history, or perish themselves.

        Homeric epic warfare and adventure in a time of savage desperation. Now does the that sound like a great setting or what?
        Last edited by Prometheus878; 11-22-2017, 02:18 AM.


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        • #19
          (I really like the Bronze Age Atlantis idea. That could practically be an entire book in itself, I think.)


          Hmm. Just doing the ones from First Edition.

          Greeks:
          • Classic: The Archaic Period (?), when all the famous Heroes had their adventures, ending around the time of the Trojan War.
          • Modern: The Romantic Period, with a special focus on Lord Byron and the Greek War of Independence.
          Egyptians:
          • Classic: The Third Dynasty of the Old Kingdom, under Djoser, with his court wunderkind Imhotep.
          • Modern: The 1920s, after the discover of King Tut's Tomb.
          • Alternate: Victorian Era, with a focus on ritual magic societies and mysticism.
          Norse:
          • Classic: 8th and 9th century AD, perhaps with a special focus on exploring the edges of the world, including Vineland.
          • Modern: Kind of a tough one. I'm not going near WW2 with a ten foot pole. Perhaps Sweden under the reign of Gustavus Adolphus.
          Aztecs:
          • Classic: The Aztec Empire at the end of the 15th century.
          • Modern: The Second Mexican Empire (1863-1867) or the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920)
          Japanese:
          • Classic: The later Kamakura Period (13th century), maybe including the failed Kenmu Restoration
          • Modern: Again, not touching WW2 with a ten foot pole. However, the Taisho Democracy period just before that has potential, I think.
          • Alternate: The late 1980s during the Bubble Economy.
          Loa:
          • Classic: The Golden Age of Piracy in the late 17th century.
          • Modern: New Orleans right after Katrina, which could be seen as an assault by Mami Wati/The Drowned Road.
          • Alternate: New Orleans during the Civil War under Union occupation.
          Will try to think of ones for the Chinese, Hindu, Celt and Persians later.


          What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
          Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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          • #20
            for Celtic -
            Classic: roman invasion of Britain,
            Modern: maybe northern Ireland during the troubles but that could be really difficult to play with

            Hindu -
            Classic: i really have no idea
            Modern: India during the Raj

            Persian -
            Classic - the Greco-Persian war
            Modern - Part of me wants to say the Gulf War, but that could be a really sticky subject

            no idea about china, and tbh some of these could be really difficult to play with and some of them really involve more than one pantheon.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
              Norse:
              • Modern: Kind of a tough one. I'm not going near WW2 with a ten foot pole. Perhaps Sweden under the reign of Gustavus Adolphus.
              ​Hey, now! If you're going to invoke that name, you'd BETTER have some accompanying music!



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              • #22
                Persians:
                • Classic: The Kayanian Dynasty, which is the setting of both the Avesta (the sacred text of Zoroastrianism) and the Shahnahmeh (Iran's national epic)
                • Modern: Another toughie. Tabaristan during their resistance to the Islamic conquest of Persia would be interesting, but also might offend some people. Maybe the Safavid Dynasty? Iran in the 1970s might be too weird.
                Hindu:
                • Classic: The Later Vedic Period (1100-500BC)
                • Modern: The British Raj, around 1900, would be interesting, but at the same time, the Gupta Empire (315-551) is really cool.
                Chinese:
                • Classic: A hard one. I am badly torn between the Qin and Han Dynasties.
                • Modern: I'm thinking the Qing in the period between the Opium Wars and the Boxer Uprising.
                Celts:
                • Classic: Ireland around the 1st century (AD or BC, either one)
                • Modern: The Easter Uprising of 1916
                Edit: If you decided to go with the idea that for each, the "classical" setting should be when either the culture in question was at an apex or else it was the time when all these gods and heroes really were walking the earth, and the "modern" setting should be one in which the PCs of that pantheon have the chance to change history in a way that might favor their virtues and ideals (or at least keep the Titanspawn down), then one option for the Norse might be either the 1848 uprisings or the Weimar Republic. (Because, honestly, no game setting that allows for you to punch Hitler in the face can ever be wrong.)
                Last edited by No One of Consequence; 11-22-2017, 11:22 PM.


                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                • #23
                  And completely unrelated, if alternate history settings were a possibility, I'd love to see something with the Cherokee and Muskogee pantheons in a 19th century where Andrew Jackson was killed at the Battle of New Orleans, being a catalyst for the Southeastern tribes not getting removed to Oklahoma.


                  What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                  Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                  • #24
                    In regards to China. If I recall correctly, the first listed dynasty is actually fictional. Used as a point of comparison to the dynasty listed second.

                    Why not a setting taking place during that supposedly fictional, mythical dynasty?

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                    • #25
                      The Xia dynasty would probably work OK, yes.


                      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                        I think Neall’s mentioned the reign of Julian the Apostate as a historic era he’d like to use for a Scion Shard.

                        Alexandrian Empire and the rise of Greco-Bactrian civilization would be fun! See Heracles convert to Buddhism and finally find inner peace...
                        I'd kill for that setting.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by xhepablo View Post

                          I'd kill for that setting.
                          Just thinking about the timeframe - Buddhism while fairly well developed in India at this point, hasn’t really spread beyond the sub-continent. I don’t think the Palas are their own Pantheon yet, but some Deva are avowed Buddhists.

                          But we can have the roots of the future Palas forming, Heracles gains the Mantle of Vajripani; Mahakala increasing draws away from the rest of Shiva on a spiritual path that is unlocking Yidam, etc etc.


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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                            Celts:
                            • Classic: Ireland around the 1st century (AD or BC, either one)
                            • Modern: The Easter Uprising of 1916
                            The Easter Uprising is probably... not an awesome setting for Scion simply because how those wounds are still super open. Similarly to setting a game during The Troubles. Those are both areas that are still incredibly close to the hearts of a lot of people over there. Especially since the Easter Uprising rolls right into the Irish Civil War which would be even more... contentious. Like, my grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, and cousins still take the Civil War and the Michael Collins - Éamon de Valera situation deadly seriously.

                            Yates' Celtic Twilight period of Celtic literary romanticism and revival might be a better modern period for the Tuatha. The romanticization of the stories, and the Celtic past would probably get the Tuatha super-duper pissy as they are reinterpreted as 'peaceful' which would be Slanderous to the Tuatha. You would get to explore the clash of romanticization and reality, getting to interact with Lady Gregory, Yates, and the rest of that crew.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Watcher View Post

                              The Easter Uprising is probably... not an awesome setting for Scion simply because how those wounds are still super open. Similarly to setting a game during The Troubles. Those are both areas that are still incredibly close to the hearts of a lot of people over there. Especially since the Easter Uprising rolls right into the Irish Civil War which would be even more... contentious. Like, my grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts, and cousins still take the Civil War and the Michael Collins - Éamon de Valera situation deadly seriously.

                              Yates' Celtic Twilight period of Celtic literary romanticism and revival might be a better modern period for the Tuatha. The romanticization of the stories, and the Celtic past would probably get the Tuatha super-duper pissy as they are reinterpreted as 'peaceful' which would be Slanderous to the Tuatha. You would get to explore the clash of romanticization and reality, getting to interact with Lady Gregory, Yates, and the rest of that crew.
                              Good point. Unfortunately, it often seems that almost all of Ireland's history post-@800AD has that problem.

                              Even the Celtic Twilight period has the Young Ireland Rebellion in 1848, although that's part of the general revolutionary movement across Europe at the time. (Really, you could do a lot of interesting stuff with most of the pantheons in that year.)


                              What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                              Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
                                Good point. Unfortunately, it often seems that almost all of Ireland's history post-@800AD has that problem.
                                Like, honestly, totally. I spent a while sitting around trying to think of a good historical setting for Ireland, and just nothing works brilliantly. The problem is both that a lot of those wounds are still totally fresh as you mention, and also that the Tuatha have a general apathy leaning 'desire to overthrow' relationship with the mortals of Ireland. They're hard to write into a story that doesn't end with them bursting out of the Sidhe mounds with iron chains for the descendants of Mil.

                                The French Revolution might be an interesting period to look at a clash between the Theoi aspects and Nemetondevos aspects. The overthrow of the Crown due to famine, bad rulership, and inhospitality is entirely legitimate in the Gaulish system as much as we can reconstruct it. Even things being whipped up to a frenzy of executions can tie into the Gauls and the Head Cult. But then there is conflict with the Theoi as classical thought starts to take over the Revolution and it moves away from a Celtic 'Bres-Situation' to a classical philosophy situation of 'The True State'.

                                It might be that this was the first attempt of the Nemetondevos to crawl back from the brink, maybe trying to revive themselves off the destruction of a Classical-leaning upper class, and the Theoi step in and grab the situation by the horns and tilt it towards their own system to keep the Gaulish Deities down.

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