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The Many Mantles of Dionysus and the Predecessors of the Theoi

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  • The Many Mantles of Dionysus and the Predecessors of the Theoi

    Here's a little video that could serve to be interesting. This vid goes over Dionysus, our old favorite Greek God of getting drunk and throwing amazing parties, it starts by saying who he is in a brief overview of his most common myths. The interesting part is after that the narrator starts to go a little deeper and discusses the origins of who Dionysus was as he goes over through many incarnations through the ages. The interesting thing of course as it relates to the setting of Scion the many changes and syncretisms that the God goes through are all given a reason why in-setting, that is Mantles. I think this video gives a perfect example of how Mantles work as new ones develop to fit the era and Mantles of other gods are taken and merged as parts of a single whole. This vid also can serve as an interesting story-hook to those who wish to conduct further research and explore the forgotten history of the Theoi and the mantles they have abandoned or to unravel the Mystery around such a god who possesses such an abundance of mantles both new and ancient. Anyway hope it's fun.

    Also. ps I love these guys youtube channel. There great.

    Last edited by Iceblade44; 06-15-2018, 03:12 PM.


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  • #2
    Huh,I was just asking about him a few hours ago

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    • #3
      I remember a theory from somewhere about Aphrodite being Ishtar (and Astarte and others), but can't remember specifics.


      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
        I remember a theory from somewhere about Aphrodite being Ishtar (and Astarte and others), but can't remember specifics.
        I'm positive that there is such a theory, wouldn't surprise me. Once you go down the rabbit hole of anthropology a lot of things becomes jumbled as myths become connected


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        • #5
          Ishtar and Aphrodite was certainly the conflation the Ancient Greeks themselves made. Not to the same degree of drawing directly on Mesopotamian myths the way the Romans cribbed from the Greeks on a claim of direct continuity - but when they wrote of Phoenician and Babylonian religion, they’d refer to temple prositutes of Aphrodite, because that was simply the assumption they made as to the “true identity” of any sex goddess they encountered.

          Ovid’s rendition of the Adonis story is probably directly cribbed from Near East story of Lord (Adonai) Dumuzid being the lover of Ishtar and Ereshkigal (Aphrodite and Persephone in the Classical retelling). The Near East version makes more sense as if Persephone was going to take a lover for half the year, it wouldn’t be the half she was in the underworld with Hades. But Ereshkigal has no annual cycle and is always in the underworld, and the Near East version probably is a cyclical rebirth narrative with Dumuzid playing the same role as Persephone’s own yearly cycle in Greek myth.


          Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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          • #6
            Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
            Ishtar and Aphrodite was certainly the conflation the Ancient Greeks themselves made. Not to the same degree of drawing directly on Mesopotamian myths the way the Romans cribbed from the Greeks on a claim of direct continuity - but when they wrote of Phoenician and Babylonian religion, they’d refer to temple prositutes of Aphrodite, because that was simply the assumption they made as to the “true identity” of any sex goddess they encountered.

            Ovid’s rendition of the Adonis story is probably directly cribbed from Near East story of Lord (Adonai) Dumuzid being the lover of Ishtar and Ereshkigal (Aphrodite and Persephone in the Classical retelling). The Near East version makes more sense as if Persephone was going to take a lover for half the year, it wouldn’t be the half she was in the underworld with Hades. But Ereshkigal has no annual cycle and is always in the underworld, and the Near East version probably is a cyclical rebirth narrative with Dumuzid playing the same role as Persephone’s own yearly cycle in Greek myth.
            I can see Hades and Persphone both being annoyed by this tale,while Aphrodite tries to enforce it.


            Thoughts ripple out, birthing others

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