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Homebrew Aesir: Hodur, the Blind God

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  • Homebrew Aesir: Hodur, the Blind God

    Hodur, God of Doom, Blindness and Betrayal
    Aliases: Hod, Hodr, Hoder

    ‘Betrayal.’ It isn’t as though he intended it. Oh, yes, Hodur made the immensely poor decision to trust Loki, yes. And yes, he absolutely did just shoot at his own brother, Baldr, but everyone else was doing it, too. Yes, he struck the killing blow, sure. Yes, he is partially at fault. But it was Loki’s idea, wasn’t it? And now? Now he can’t be worshipped. It is forbidden, quite strictly. And yet, in that forbiddance, Hodur has found a place.

    Hodur is not worshipped. He is guarded against. His ‘cults’ are to keep his power away, because Hodur brings disaster. He is the Blind God, unable to guide the doom he calls down except with his very presence. It should be no surprise, then, that he is also dead. That part could be much worse, especially given that with the Baldr incident he managed to anger everyone else so much that Odin had another son solely to escape the fact that vengeance had been forbidden. Hodur still thinks that Vali and his obsession with vengeful justice are rather wrong-headed. After all, he didn’t kill Loki, did he? Being dead seems to keep Vali away most of the time, at least.

    Hodur does appreciate getting to spend time with Hel and even with Baldr. Baldr doesn’t hold grudges, and Hel appreciates having someone around who is completely unbothered by her appearance. (Indeed, Hodur sometimes even has love affairs with Hel. They tend not to last long, however, given the disasters that follow him everywhere.) Hodur is, paradoxically, one of the most hopeful of the Aesir. The worst has already happened to him, and he has no particular love for most of his family. Certainly he has none for his father, Odin, or his mother, Frigg. When the end comes, he will be fine, and everyone else will have met the doom that he heralds. It seems fair.

    Hodur’s Incarnations are rarely welcome. He is always traveling, a blind man whose presence calls forth terrible things for those who befriend him. It is unsurprising that he has far fewer Scions than his lovely brother. When he appears, it is in roles that allow him to travel, as well as to use his great strength. He is a day laborer, a hobo, a traveling salesman, a crime boss’s diplomat. His Scions are often marked by the chaos and turmoil of his wake, but tend to be spared its direct effects. Their friends are not always so lucky.

    Callings: Liminal, Sage, Warrior
    Purviews: Chaos, Darkness, Death, Epic Strength



    Hodur doesn't actually have much in the stories we have about the pantheon, but I consulted with a friend who's an expert in Norse and Icelandic lore to write up this version of him.

  • #2
    Hmmm,here's a question I'd love to ask, who'd you pick to play Hodur in a movie or tv show?

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    • #3
      Someone big and scary-looking, probably. I'm not good at actor names.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MorsRattus View Post
        Someone big and scary-looking, probably. I'm not good at actor names.
        I feel that Bradley Cooper could do it personally,by the way the write up is amazing, it made not only want to play a scion of Hodur,but also Hodur himself once I got the rules for that
        I also would like to know,am I right to assume he prefers to create scion or choose them than having relationships with mortals go birth them?

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        • #5
          I would imagine he's fine either way. Hodur, to my mind, is not a person who thinks very hard about consequences or worries too much about things going badly for him. Everyone else around him is going to have problems, but he'll be fine.

          E: largely because, well, his future is already written, and he's had the worst of it. Odin had a son specifically to kill him, Vali, and Vali killed him. When Ragnarok happens, he is prophesied to go outside and have a nice day in the sun with Baldr once everyone else is dead.

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          • #6
            So you’re going with the death of Baldr as something that’s already happened, rather than a prophesy hanging over the Aesir (which I think is the canon default position)?


            Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
              Hmmm,here's a question I'd love to ask, who'd you pick to play Hodur in a movie or tv show?

              Jared Turner was cast as Hodr in The Almighty Johnsons.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                So you’re going with the death of Baldr as something that’s already happened, rather than a prophesy hanging over the Aesir (which I think is the canon default position)?
                I’m treating time as a thing that is weird, and the deaths of Baldr and Hodur as entirely compatible with them still being around, because there is literally nothing to Hodur before the event occurs, at all.

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                • #9
                  I really like it, but wasn't Hodr also the (or at least a) god of Poetry and Deep Winter? I'd have given him Creator over Warrior but I really like your write-up.


                  Call Me Ray.

                  Southern Gothic - Welcome to New Calais

                  Who Wants to Live Forever – Highlander in the World of Darkness

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                  • #10
                    From my research: nope. Hodr is barely mentioned at all outside of the one story, and he was explicitly forbidden to worship according to my scholarly friend, due to his place as a symbol of taboo-breaking.

                    e: The winter thing appears to be an attempt to dualistically pair him with Baldr's spring and summer symbolism.

                    Except that enforcing dualism is generally speaking not a good idea because it draws on bad anthropology that falsely attempts to apply archetypal patterns that aren't actually universal.
                    Last edited by MorsRattus; 08-16-2018, 12:51 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MorsRattus View Post
                      I’m treating time as a thing that is weird, and the deaths of Baldr and Hodur as entirely compatible with them still being around, because there is literally nothing to Hodur before the event occurs, at all.

                      Wasn't there something about Hodr fighting with Baldr over Nanna? I want to say it was in Saxo, but don't quote me on that.

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                      • #12
                        That particular story interprets neither as divine, nor as brothers. It also renamed them in Latinate names.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MorsRattus View Post
                          That particular story interprets neither as divine, nor as brothers. It also renamed them in Latinate names.
                          If they did die before, they could be Incarnating over again, and that was one of those times - both dying in Fate’s cycle before they achieved divine levels of Legend.


                          Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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                          • #14
                            MorsRattus Hey, thanks, I didn't realize that, though it does make sense.


                            Call Me Ray.

                            Southern Gothic - Welcome to New Calais

                            Who Wants to Live Forever – Highlander in the World of Darkness

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                            • #15
                              I like it. On the mythology front, I did hear one thing that the only image believed to be of Hod depicts him as a strong, non-blind warrior and the blind reference may have been a poetic kenning for him being Loki's unwitting pawn,

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