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Apis, the Sacred Bull, Netjer Outcast

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  • Apis, the Sacred Bull, Netjer Outcast

    Apis, the Sacred Bull, God of the Ptolemies, Ex-King of the Dead
    Aliases: Hapis, Serapis, Hapi-ankh, Aser-hapi

    Apis wasn’t always outcast from his own pantheon. Long, long ago, he was just Apis, son of Het-Heru, Apis the Bull God and intermediary with the great and powerful. Ambition, truly, can be a curse. Apis’ role expanded from merely being lord of the sacred bull and a source of prophecy. He was quick to ally with the invading Theoi that followed Alexander, and he was propitiated by Alexander, among other gods. He was said to incarnate again and again as the sacred Apis Bull, and the ritual sacrifice, death and rebirth of the bulls tied him to Wasir, as the Wasir Apis. the Osiris Apis, the bull-king in death.


    This, perhaps, is where the plan was hatched. Apis sent a dream to Ptolemy I Soter. That is where it all took off. Aser-hapi, they called him,, and the Greeks loved him. They remade him in the image of a man, absorbing elements of Hades and Pluto, and in so doing, Apis usurped the role. Aser-hapi became Serapis, the patron of the Ptolemies and symbol of the Greco-Egyptian rule. He was said to be more than just a ka of Wasir, but to be Wasir in whole, and his worship for a time displaced that of Wasir proper. Aset was said to be his wife, and Heru his son, by the Greek name Harpocrates, Heru the Younger, and Anpu his dog, via conflation with Cerberus. He was immensely popular and his cult was vital in maintaining the Ptolemaic rule, and later Roman control of Egypt.


    Which is also what brought its fall. When Christianity came, Apis was a symbol they rebelled against. In the 4th century CE, a Christian mob destroyed his temple, his Serapeum, in Alexandria - always the center of his Ptolemaic worship. Where the other Netjer escaped much of their condemnation and wrath by staying more distant, Apis had his power torn from him, as Wasir took his vengeance, using the moment to seize back all that Apis had absorbed. Even now, the other Netjer have little love for Apis, save for his mother, Het-Heru, and he spends most of his time in the halls of the Theoi, where he is more appreciated...though Hades has no love for Apis, either.


    Apis still sees himself as a divine king, and his incarnations reflect this. He is an ambitious leader in all forms, a crafty and wily figure that helps others to gain advantage himself. He is a gang leader, a ruthless politician, a general plotting a coup. He is not a bad father, and his Scions often benefit from his ambitions. He rules well. But he makes enemies, always, and often they are people whom he has seized something from. His Scions, while they benefit from his largesse, also suffer the wrath of their father’s many foes. They are fairly rare, and often end up with a complex relationship with Apis himself, thanks to the problems they inherit.


    Callings: Leader, Liminal, Trickster
    Purviews: Beasts (Bull), Death, Fortune, Fertility, Health, Order


  • #2
    No love for Apis? This is a really quality interpretation of him. I like how you made sense of the rather contradictory nature of this deity.

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    • #3
      I really wanted to figure out a way to make Serapis work, because he was crucially historically important, but also in this extremely weird place mythologically and theologically from a view of the entire pantheon.

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      • #4
        I think you did a pretty good job of that, for what my opinion is worth

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        • #5
          This is really good, Mors! I've spent the last year after playing Assassin's Creed Origins wondering if and how you could work Serapis into scion,

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Karasu-sama View Post
            This is really good, Mors! I've spent the last year after playing Assassin's Creed Origins wondering if and how you could work Serapis into scion,
            On the Serapis angle, MorsRattus, would you treat him as a duel-Pantheon god, wielding Metamorphosis along with Heku, with Scions of both Virtue sets?


            Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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            • #7
              I could see it. PC Scions would obviously have to pick one, of course.

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              • #8
                Cute sidenote, Rick Riordan used Serapis as a villain in one of his Kane Chronicles/Percy Jackson crossover short stories. He was trying create a new lighthouse of Alexandria to draw Egyptian and Greek gods to him so he could feed on their essence and conflate himself with them to become more and more powerful.


                Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                  Cute sidenote, Rick Riordan used Serapis as a villain in one of his Kane Chronicles/Percy Jackson crossover short stories. He was trying create a new lighthouse of Alexandria to draw Egyptian and Greek gods to him so he could feed on their essence and conflate himself with them to become more and more powerful.
                  I loved that story!


                  "We have done the impossible, and that makes us mighty."
                  Captain Malcolm Reynolds

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                  • #10
                    Edit: never mind, I forgot Xerxes I did actually try and elevate Anura Mazda over the Netjer, debunking the statement i’m editing over.
                    Last edited by glamourweaver; 10-30-2018, 03:24 AM.


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