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The Atua - A Kiwi Perspective

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  • The Atua - A Kiwi Perspective

    Kia ora from New Zealand. I've noticed a few folks state that they want the polynesian pantheon through a Hawai'ian lens, and I'm honestly puzzled why.

    When you consider the fact that there are more Māori than Hawai'i Maoli, and the fact that the NZ population is several times larger than that of Hawai'i, NZ and Māori make more sense. Many Tongans, Samoans, Tuvaluans, Niueians, etc. call NZ home too (over 10% of the NZ populace, making 25% of NZ's populace polynesian; in fact, the lion's share of all the polynesians globally, live here). Add in the fact that most polynesian islands are closer to NZ too. And the fact that NZ is officially and legally a bi-cultural society (though not without problems). Plus of course, there are a lot of links to Australia with many Māori living there as well. Surely if a polynesian pantheon was based where more of its worshippers lived, and therefore used the dominant polynesian culture there as its face, Māori culture in NZ makes far more sense?

    Just some food for thought.

    Ngā mihi.
    Last edited by Jargogle Bamboozle; 10-20-2018, 04:41 AM.

  • #2
    I'll say that with me, as an American, Hawai'i is where my brain goes to for Pacific Islanders that can be considered Polynesian. I'll fully admit that it hadn't occurred to me where the distribution is.

    I mean I'm willing to listen, and I hope that the writers get some good experts in on a variety of Polynesian cultures for when it comes time to work on Demigod.


    Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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    • #3
      I think it be fine to explore all bits of Polynesian culture where ever it turns up.

      Because for one thing from what I am aware that the New Zealand traditions is one of the more complete and central about their myths.

      At the same time I want Pele


      .

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      • #4
        The names that have been dropped already are the Maori ones, so that’s the focus I’m expecting, with their Hawaiian Mantles included, but as with the Manitou and Orenda, I’d be surprised if Pele didn’t make a cameo as a respected and feared cousin.


        Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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        • #5
          That's all good to know; I did wonder if it was in part because "polynesian=Hawai'ian" for many Americans.

          Yep, the mythology is still very detailed and intact over here. Kids learn elements of it and Te Reo Māori in school, even if they're pākehā (white European kiwis). There are marae everywhere, we all learn waiata (traditional songs), and teach pepeha (traditional Māori introductions, used after the pōwhiri - the formal welcome on to the marae).

          Auckland is currently more culturally and racially diverse than London and New York and is the fourth most cosmopolitan city in the world. With a quarter of the population being polynesian (including Māori), the polynesian population is actually growing here.

          If it puts the beautiful mix we've got here in perspective, in my class of 26 (I'm a teacher), we have 1 Samoan, 2 Tuvaluans, 1 Niueian, 1 Cook Island Māori, and 3 Māori, not to mention a motley array of South Africans, Dutch and British immigrants, and pākehā. Pretty typical, though in more central Auckland you'd have a number of Chinese kids too as there has been a huge wave of immigration from China in more recent history.
          Last edited by Jargogle Bamboozle; 10-20-2018, 08:20 PM.

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