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[2E] Bogovi - Slavic Pantheon

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  • #16
    Since I brought it up, here are some additional points of Vineta:

    First, there are multiple sites that have been speculated as the possible location for Vineta - this map shows some of them:



    Of course, in the World, any of these might lead to Vineta!

    Furthermore, I've translated this German-language tale of Vineta into English. The full translation will be posted publicly on my Patreon on July 1st (see my signature), but some interesting points include:

    - In the city there lived "Greeks, Slavs, Wends, Saxons, and many other tribes besides." Each worshiped their own gods and had their own temples, except for the Saxons who were Christians at the time and who weren't allowed to worship in public. Thus, this might have been "neutral territory" between the different Pantheons - though according to one variant of the city's end, this peace between the tribes (and presumably their gods) didn't last, especially once they started calling outsiders (such as Swedes and Danes) for help in their bid for supremacy.

    - In another version the sinking of the city was a divine curse for the city's wasteful ways. One possible translation indicates that the inhabitants even used bread rolls for cleaning their children. It would also be possible to translate this in a way that implies a sexual fetish for cleaning one's children with bread rolls, which I don't want to think too deeply about - the notion of bread rolls being used as asswipes is disturbing enough.

    - The city is still sometimes spotted under the waves - with inhabitants! Since they are explicitly mentioned to walk down its streets, they presumably haven't been transformed into mermaids...

    - The city also rises above the waves on Easter Monday.


    Sunken Castles, Evil Poodles is creating Public Domain translations of German folklore!

    A German Geek - my gaming blog!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by wyrdhamster View Post
      [SIZE=18px]
      Radegast – AKA: Radhost, Radigost – Purviews: Darkness, Order, Stars
      In the story starting on p.5 of Mecklenburgische Sagen, Radigast (also called Zuarasiel) is said to be the first among the deities worshiped at Rhetra, and he is also called the "all-powerful". Furthermore, the main temple of the city had pillars on the outside that had the shapes of horns of all sorts of animals.


      Sunken Castles, Evil Poodles is creating Public Domain translations of German folklore!

      A German Geek - my gaming blog!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Jürgen Hubert View Post
        Radigast is said to be the first among the deities worshiped at Rhetra, and he is also called the "all-powerful". Furthermore, the main temple of the city had pillars on the outside that had the shapes of horns of all sorts of animals.
        'All-powerful' is poetic title, not doing anything to Purviews - however, horns before temple maybe pointing to Beast Purview?


        My stuff for Scion 2E, CoD Contagion, Dark Eras, VtR 2E, WtF 2E, MtAw 2E & BtP
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        • #19
          Originally posted by wyrdhamster View Post

          'All-powerful' is poetic title, not doing anything to Purviews - however, horns before temple maybe pointing to Beast Purview?

          Wikipedia speculates he may have been a god of Hospitality.


          Sunken Castles, Evil Poodles is creating Public Domain translations of German folklore!

          A German Geek - my gaming blog!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Jürgen Hubert View Post


            Wikipedia speculates he may have been a god of Hospitality.
            May I interject that Radegast is not an actual Slavic deity in any sense of the word? He is entirely based on a scribal error. Radegast/Redigast is first mentioned in the Chronicon of Thietmar of Merseburg, where it is named as a town where the god Svarozic is worshipped. This is then also the "Zuarasici" you misread as "Zuarasiel" in that 19th-Century collection, Jürgen. Only later, when Adam of Bremen copied Thietmar's information for his Ecclesiastical History of Hamburg did the mistake happen, because Adam accidentally uses the name Radegast for the god instead of the town. The 19th-Century collection you quote, Jürgen, then repeats that mistake, going so far as to "correct" Thietmar's older version of giving the name of Radegast to the town instead of the god. To summarise: Radegast as an individual deity does not exist, he is an accidental misapplication of the name of a cult site to the figure worshipped there, namely the better-known god Svarozic.

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            • #21
              Well, I suppose that the good people of Gadebusch will be disappointed to learn that they don't have "Radegast's crown" as one of their church windows then... (see p. 8 of the same source).

              Though folklore - and deities - often started with less. I mean, these days most people are convinced that the figure of the Lorelei is from a really old legend, as opposed to invented in 1801.


              Sunken Castles, Evil Poodles is creating Public Domain translations of German folklore!

              A German Geek - my gaming blog!

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              • #22
                Though... do you have any sources on "Radegast was a scribal error"? I'd like to get to the bottom of this - if not for Scion, then for my own folklore writings...


                Sunken Castles, Evil Poodles is creating Public Domain translations of German folklore!

                A German Geek - my gaming blog!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Jürgen Hubert View Post
                  Though... do you have any sources on "Radegast was a scribal error"? I'd like to get to the bottom of this - if not for Scion, then for my own folklore writings...
                  You can mostly deduce it by comparing the chronology of the word appearing across sources - among the roughly contemporaneous ones, I think it occurs only in Thietmar of Merseburg, Adam of Bremen, and Helmold. If you want to see someone with more authority than me explain it, though, look at this chapter here (I hope it's available completely for you as well, otherwise I guess you'll have to procure that book or trust me as is): https://books.google.de/books?id=ZbJ...page&q&f=false

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