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  • Changes in myths on modern times

    Hello,

    I was watching Coco with my son and What come to my mind was “Well, Michtlan changed a lot since the fall of Mexicah.”

    The point in this is, the Teotl, Aesir, Theoi and Netjer traditions were largely abandoned for the last 500+ years, and many of them were reviewed by modern eyes, and, like before, the myths were changed, the gods gained new mantles and things like that

    What changes would you add to the old gods to adapt them to the new world?


    The proper answer to “Hello There” is, obviously, “General Kenobi”.
    Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
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  • #2
    Originally posted by Mateus Luz View Post
    Hello,

    I was watching Coco with my son and What come to my mind was “Well, Michtlan changed a lot since the fall of Mexicah.”

    The point in this is, the Teotl, Aesir, Theoi and Netjer traditions were largely abandoned for the last 500+ years, and many of them were reviewed by modern eyes, and, like before, the myths were changed, the gods gained new mantles and things like that

    What changes would you add to the old gods to adapt them to the new world?
    Correction: Mesoamerican religious traditions like those of the Nahua Teteo were never truly abandoned, even though they transformed under missionary and inquisitorial pressure. To this day, indigenous people in rural Mexico sacrifice chickens to the sun god Jesus. Desperate prayers are offered to the lord of rain, whether he is called Tlaloc (and often he still is) or San Juan. Many still speak of Quetzalcoatl as the founder of their villages. And new figures have changed, with Motecuhzoma now being considered an earth and death deity in many parts of indigenous Mexico. Comparing that to the complete disappearance of the ancient European and Near Eastern traditions is misguided; the defining feature of Latin American Christianisation is its failure.

    That said, Coco is absolutely awesome; it is, however, more based on Mexican folk Christianity than the beliefs of rural indigenous people, which are often far closer to pre-conquest religion.

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    • #3
      That is one of the points I want to discuss. The religion changed, some were all but abandoned, others are still there but changed by the way human culture changes. It means that gods have changed, gained mantles, had scions, were forgotten.

      Mesoanerican (and South America, in a minor degree) still follow a mix of Christian and pre-colonization religions, some places more christian, some places more teotl (or local gods).
      The Orisha s become Loa in the Caribbean and South of USA.
      Minerva is still alive in many engineering councils around the world (including Brazilian) and engineering schools (including mine).
      The cult of the Aesir is a real and official religion in Iceland.

      What do you guys think happened to your favorite gods in a World that didn’t give their religion the prestige that was given before?


      The proper answer to “Hello There” is, obviously, “General Kenobi”.
      Fists of Flux - Inspired and Powered Martial Arts for Talents
      https://www.drivethrurpg.com/product.../Fists-of-Flux

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