Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Breadth of Pantheons?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Breadth of Pantheons?

    If you're running a game, do you try to limit the number of Pantheons that NPCs come from or just let it run as wide as it will? Do you choose to focus on specific ones for themes? Do your players prefer to focus in terms of pantheon or do they like it with a wide mix?

  • #2
    Basically, I check out what mythologies the group knows and likes and then I play toward those. One campaign, the players all knew the Greek myths and had vague knowledge of the Egyptian, Irish, and Norse myths. So they were all Theoi Scions and pretty much delt with only the myths they knew.

    It's a game, not a comparative religion seminar.

    Comment


    • #3
      I like to plan things out a little in advance, in terms of who's involved and what they're doing. So unless there's a specific theme for the game I usually consider pantheons for NPCs based firstly on what kind of NPC might be cool in a given scene or story, and then which pantheon or specific god based on who is cool.

      So for example if the story involves robberies from a museum, where the NPC is going to be a curator that the band needs to take up with, I'll go 'You know, I think I'm going to make him a lot like John Hannah's character Jonathan Carnahan from The Mummy, because he was funny and I loved him.'. Then I'll go 'OK what pantheon do I think will suit?'. In this case, maybe it's nostalgia for the movie, but I make him Egyptian. So I move to 'Which god would be cool?' and I decide that he's a scion of Sehkmet because she's very cool, and that he's been following on her 'protect the Pharoah' calling by protecting the relics of the Pharaoh and that what will make for a fun encounter is that his Jonathan-Carnahan-style wheeling and dealing means that he was sneaking a peek in another exhibit and helping himself to something he was sure wouldn't be missed when thieves broke in and stole something he was supposed to be watching and now he's very nervous because when mother dearest finds out he messed up (again) she's going to be seriously unhappy.

      And I kind of people the whole NPC cast more or less like that

      My players tend to appreciate a wide mix because they like the fun clash of cultures and not being able to easily guess who a new NPC might be in with.

      Comment


      • #4
        I plan a weeks or even months in advance new chronicle. When collecting players, I made great poll of 11 possible Pantheons and say to players - 'vote on 3 Pantheons you would like in this kind of story'. Then I compile main Pantheons list for the game, from players answers. HOWEVER, if I want to add NPC from other Gods families - I simply add one to story. Starting list is just this - starting list of main gods in game.

        Pantheons poll I use:
        Aesir - Norse Gods
        Bogovi - Gods of the Slavs
        Deva - Gods of India (in Asia)
        Kami - Japanese gods
        Manitou - Gods of the Algonkin First Nations (in America)
        Netjet - Egyptian gods
        Orisha - Gods of Yoruba (Africans)
        Shen - Chinese Gods
        Teotel - Gods of the Aztecs
        Theoi - Greco-Roman Gods
        Tuatha De Danann - Gods of the Celts
        Last edited by wyrdhamster; 12-14-2020, 03:01 AM.


        My stuff for Realms of Pugmire, Scion 2E, CoD Contagion, Dark Eras, VtR 2E, WtF 2E, MtAw 2E, MtC 2E & BtP
        LGBT+ through Ages
        LGBT+ in CoD games

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Astromancer View Post
          It's a game, not a comparative religion seminar.
          Huh, well, funny you should mention that, as I'm kinda running this as part of a comparative religion seminar, so to speak. Not that I have a content requirement. I run a kind of educational community ministry, and running these games is our primary activity.

          wyrdhamster>
          I noticed you had links on your sig to LGBTQ+ gaming and mythology info. My ministry is a Unitarian Universalist one, and we're a denomination of allies. I'm going to link our website to the Wiki articles you have there. Would you mind if I put up some of the posts you have here on our website? If so, should I attribute it to Wyrdhamster or another name?
          Last edited by BunniRabbi; 12-14-2020, 10:29 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BunniRabbi View Post
            Would you mind if I put up some of the posts you have here on our website? If so, should I attribute it to Wyrdhamster or another name?
            Go ahead, I do not have problem with that. My legal name is Karol Litwińczuk, from Lublin in Poland.


            My stuff for Realms of Pugmire, Scion 2E, CoD Contagion, Dark Eras, VtR 2E, WtF 2E, MtAw 2E, MtC 2E & BtP
            LGBT+ through Ages
            LGBT+ in CoD games

            Comment


            • #7
              I seem to have a bit of a different approach to those who have posted so far. I'll obviously focus on the pantheons my players are Scions of (in the case of my current game, that's Aesir, Kami, and Shén) predominantly, but after that I'll tend to go with ones they're less familiar with, both to introduce them to the awesome stories that are out there and also to make sure things come as somewhat of a surprise.

              All that being said, my own knowledge is not all-encompassing, so pantheons like the Manidoog that I don't know about I tend not to feature too much of, both so I don't misrepresent an already-oppressed culture and so I have less research to do.

              Edit: In terms of NPCs specifically, I'll mix it up between the various pantheons on the whole, but there will still be bias based on where they are - later in the campaign, I'm planning for the players to take a trip to Lanka, and so Deva NPCs will dominate for a bit.
              Last edited by a2a3a2a3; 12-14-2020, 03:14 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I like that approach. Rely on the familiar but introduce the unfamiliar for exposure. I may use that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm currently planning to run a D&D-esque Scion game set in a fictional world, with it's own set of gods (since I enjoy things like the Time of Troubles in the Forgotten Realms setting). I have several pantheons built for my previous D&D campaigns, but to get this game going I have to translate them into Scion pantheons. So it's about as much work as building pantheons from scratch (using the guidelines from Mysteries of The World). This is exactly as much work as it sounds like.

                  On the one hand, I know most of these deities fairly well (since I created them or modified them from other D&D gods). On the other, there's plenty of holes I have to fill in myth-wise to make them feel coherent and distinct.


                  When the cat's a Stray, the mice will pray...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by TheStray7 View Post
                    I'm currently planning to run a D&D-esque Scion game set in a fictional world, with it's own set of gods (since I enjoy things like the Time of Troubles in the Forgotten Realms setting). I have several pantheons built for my previous D&D campaigns, but to get this game going I have to translate them into Scion pantheons. So it's about as much work as building pantheons from scratch (using the guidelines from Mysteries of The World). This is exactly as much work as it sounds like.

                    On the one hand, I know most of these deities fairly well (since I created them or modified them from other D&D gods). On the other, there's plenty of holes I have to fill in myth-wise to make them feel coherent and distinct.
                    Sci Fi and fantasy could blend in this game easily. Picture an extrasolar colony that had a cultural collapse. Perhaps different groups wared against each other. Pantheons have arisen to rebuild. But each group defines rebuilding and its goals differently. You'd have wars among the gods and humanity.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Astromancer View Post

                      Sci Fi and fantasy could blend in this game easily. Picture an extrasolar colony that had a cultural collapse. Perhaps different groups wared against each other. Pantheons have arisen to rebuild. But each group defines rebuilding and its goals differently. You'd have wars among the gods and humanity.

                      That's true enough. That's not what I'm doing with this game (I'm more interested in exploring the setting's mythological "Age of Heroes" as I established it in other campaigns I've run, and this world is very much not Our Earth in any way, shape, or form), but the situation you describe is effectively the status quo I'm building -- there was a great war in which new gods rose up to challenge the old, they brought in even older gods as allies, and now the world is in a rebuilding phase and new gods and pantheons are rising in the various cultural and ethnic groups. The big sci-fi element I'm using is more Lovecraftian Cosmic Horror, though...there's a bunch of alien stars that are starting to make inroads into the world from beyond normal reality, inserting themselves and their cults into the world to gain influence for their ultimate, mysterious goals.


                      When the cat's a Stray, the mice will pray...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've yet to have the chance to run the game yet - pathogen panic and all - but ultimately it'll depend on what I decide to do. I'm likely to try starting with some sort of simple single pantheon short chronicle as a shake down run. Likely the Theoi, just because I know the most about them and so have a lot to play around with. It also makes the very simple elevator pitch of "we're playing Percy Jackson".

                        Later I'm likely to expand things a bit. But exactly which Pantheons it ended up focusing on would depend on various factors such as initial setting location, time period, what players are interested in, what antagonists sound interesting, and so on.


                        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheStray7 View Post


                          That's true enough. That's not what I'm doing with this game (I'm more interested in exploring the setting's mythological "Age of Heroes" as I established it in other campaigns I've run, and this world is very much not Our Earth in any way, shape, or form), but the situation you describe is effectively the status quo I'm building -- there was a great war in which new gods rose up to challenge the old, they brought in even older gods as allies, and now the world is in a rebuilding phase and new gods and pantheons are rising in the various cultural and ethnic groups. The big sci-fi element I'm using is more Lovecraftian Cosmic Horror, though...there's a bunch of alien stars that are starting to make inroads into the world from beyond normal reality, inserting themselves and their cults into the world to gain influence for their ultimate, mysterious goals.
                          If you have the time and energy for reading you might check out the Craft Sequence series by Max Gladstone for some inspiration. Rather than old god vs. new god his setting's recent war they are rebuilding from was "humanist necromancers vs. gods that are complex systems." It explores ideas around pantheons that were not fully destroyed and still have worshippers. Old gods who've adapted to the new world order. What happened to defeated gods that were too important to just kill? There are also some neat ideas around the effects of the war you might steal. There is a region where the top layers of reality were basically blasted away, so the area is very mutable in horrible ways. Remnants of old gods and their servants still lurking around with axes to grind for those who abandoned the gods or fought against them. Oh, and pretty sure one of the major religions doesn't even worship a god, but an alien star squid that fell to earth and now its spawn lives on the bodies of the blessed as a sort of symbiote. Lots of neat ideas that might inspire your world building.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by literatzi View Post

                            If you have the time and energy for reading you might check out the Craft Sequence series by Max Gladstone for some inspiration. Rather than old god vs. new god his setting's recent war they are rebuilding from was "humanist necromancers vs. gods that are complex systems." It explores ideas around pantheons that were not fully destroyed and still have worshippers. Old gods who've adapted to the new world order. What happened to defeated gods that were too important to just kill? There are also some neat ideas around the effects of the war you might steal. There is a region where the top layers of reality were basically blasted away, so the area is very mutable in horrible ways. Remnants of old gods and their servants still lurking around with axes to grind for those who abandoned the gods or fought against them. Oh, and pretty sure one of the major religions doesn't even worship a god, but an alien star squid that fell to earth and now its spawn lives on the bodies of the blessed as a sort of symbiote. Lots of neat ideas that might inspire your world building.

                            Sounds interesting, and I'll look into it!


                            When the cat's a Stray, the mice will pray...

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X