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  • Originally posted by Neall View Post

    Check your Inbox messages!
    Neall,could you ânswer my question about the keepers?

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    • Originally posted by Neall View Post

      Check your Inbox messages!
      Oh that's just cruel.

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      • Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
        Is it really possible for the keepers to banish all other gods from the world according to the their plan? How does that work?
        Gods of different pantheons can rewrite their own history into a coherent, singular timeline that has "always" been true, in a theomantic working called a Creation Myth. Such a Myth reinforces the structure of the World and reinforces reality itself (and the prisons of the Titans), at a cost of potentially introducing new Titans from the Primordial forces invoked. Imhotep believes he's found a way to seal the World rather than reinforce it, cutting it off permanently from the Overworld and Underworld and leaving humanity free to chart their own destiny free of the capricious influence of the Gods and the threat of the Titans.

        The Keepers are working to forge their own pantheon that is not just in defiance of, or in opposition to, other pantheons - but one that is in fact anathema to them, a sweeping change that renders the World safer, if a bit lesser.


        Neall Raemonn Price
        Beleaguered Scion Developer

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        • Given his feelings about being a God and the Celestial Bureauceacy, is Master Kung in with the Keepers?


          Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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          • Secretely Imhotep wants to seal the world because he's pissed at the new Mummy movie

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            • Originally posted by Neall View Post
              Gods of different pantheons can rewrite their own history into a coherent, singular timeline that has "always" been true, in a theomantic working called a Creation Myth. Such a Myth reinforces the structure of the World and reinforces reality itself (and the prisons of the Titans), at a cost of potentially introducing new Titans from the Primordial forces invoked. Imhotep believes he's found a way to seal the World rather than reinforce it, cutting it off permanently from the Overworld and Underworld and leaving humanity free to chart their own destiny free of the capricious influence of the Gods and the threat of the Titans.

              The Keepers are working to forge their own pantheon that is not just in defiance of, or in opposition to, other pantheons - but one that is in fact anathema to them, a sweeping change that renders the World safer, if a bit lesser.
              fascinating. thank you.

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              • In the Shen preview, it is said that Erlang can discharge thunderbolts from his third eye, but he doesn’t have the Sky Purview. Which Purview does he use to shoot thunderbolts then?

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                • Originally posted by Dr. Quantum View Post
                  In the Shen preview, it is said that Erlang can discharge thunderbolts from his third eye, but he doesn’t have the Sky Purview. Which Purview does he use to shoot thunderbolts then?
                  It might be that he has the sky boon required but doesn't meet the requirements for it to be a true Associated Purview. whatever those are in 2E.

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                  • Originally posted by Dr. Quantum View Post
                    In the Shen preview, it is said that Erlang can discharge thunderbolts from his third eye, but he doesn’t have the Sky Purview. Which Purview does he use to shoot thunderbolts then?
                    He likely does so either as a result of his third eye (which may be a relic) or through an esoteric application of the War Purview (replicating the Sky Boon, but only against foes, for example).


                    Neall Raemonn Price
                    Beleaguered Scion Developer

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                    • Originally posted by Neall View Post

                      He likely does so either as a result of his third eye (which may be a relic) or through an esoteric application of the War Purview (replicating the Sky Boon, but only against foes, for example).
                      Thanks for the awesome answer! By the way, this makes me curious, does the War Purview cover all sorts of combat? Back in 1E it seemed that War only covers battles that are ideologically inspired. Is it the same in 2E?

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                      • One question that occurred to me. It seems many of the pantheon previews we’ve seen, in discussing commonalities among the scions of certain gods, list careers and professions they often go into. If the supernatural is a known factor in the setting, and as one preview mentions, mortals expect Scions to be liaisons to the gods and a buffer against supernatural things, how can they have normal careers like businessmen, law enforcement or farmers? Politics would seem right out once mortals caught on to the existence of social knacks, I can only imagine the brutality claims against Scion cops and mistrials declared because of a Scion lawyer or Judge. Clearly not every Scion is born to actively adventure like a player character but wouldn’t Social pressure, and especially fate, force them out of such “mundane” jobs? Or do most simply find ways to deal with supernatural equivalents of those jobs? Scion farmers ensuring that nothing curses someone’s fields rather than being an actual “farmer”.

                        Or does this simply mean what they might have done pre-visitation?

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                        • While I'm on board with the notion of multiple contradicting truths coexisting, I do have to ask about the practical results of that. For example, Plato described three parts to a soul, while the Kemetic notion holds there are five. If we assume both of these are correct, what happens when an Egyptian sorcerer steals a Greek warrior's shadow? What would a Greek mystic see if they tried to divine that?

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                          • Originally posted by vonpenguin View Post
                            One question that occurred to me. It seems many of the pantheon previews we’ve seen, in discussing commonalities among the scions of certain gods, list careers and professions they often go into. If the supernatural is a known factor in the setting, and as one preview mentions, mortals expect Scions to be liaisons to the gods and a buffer against supernatural things, how can they have normal careers like businessmen, law enforcement or farmers? Politics would seem right out once mortals caught on to the existence of social knacks, I can only imagine the brutality claims against Scion cops and mistrials declared because of a Scion lawyer or Judge. Clearly not every Scion is born to actively adventure like a player character but wouldn’t Social pressure, and especially fate, force them out of such “mundane” jobs? Or do most simply find ways to deal with supernatural equivalents of those jobs? Scion farmers ensuring that nothing curses someone’s fields rather than being an actual “farmer”.

                            Or does this simply mean what they might have done pre-visitation?
                            Both pre-Visitation and post, if the Scion decides to keep their nature a secret. And some might not either believe the Scion or care, though if they're open about their nature trouble will come to them sooner rather than later. Boons are expensive to maintain and can cause Fatebindings, so you don't pull them out for every Doubting Thomas. Some Scions might appear mostly like lucky and exceptional mortals most of the time.

                            Even acknowledged, Scions are shunted off to certain roles - a lawyer might be expected to handle negotiations with the Fair Folk over zoning laws (don't laugh - it really happens in Iceland), while law enforcement might be relegated to the "Special Operations Unit" and given the "really fuckin' weird" assignments with a wide degree of latitude. I don't expect a lot of Scion farmers to be PCs, but they probably end off fighting Ratatoskr's giant squirrel spawn.

                            Originally posted by CreepyShutin
                            While I'm on board with the notion of multiple contradicting truths coexisting, I do have to ask about the practical results of that. For example, Plato described three parts to a soul, while the Kemetic notion holds there are five. If we assume both of these are correct, what happens when an Egyptian sorcerer steals a Greek warrior's shadow? What would a Greek mystic see if they tried to divine that?
                            In general, the active or offensive theology predominates, so the Greek mystic would see the warrior as "wrong" or somehow spiritually complete yet incomplete at the same time. If the reverse occurred, for example, the Egyptian sorcerer would see large chunks of the soul missing, encompassing ba and ka or other elements.

                            I'm loathe to give hard-and-fast answers because those should be determined at the table. With so many mythologies and theologies intermixing, hard-and-fast rules are impossible to determine. I realize it's a bit of a judgment call on the part of the Storyguide, but that's the only way this will work.


                            Neall Raemonn Price
                            Beleaguered Scion Developer

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                            • Originally posted by Dr. Quantum View Post

                              Thanks for the awesome answer! By the way, this makes me curious, does the War Purview cover all sorts of combat? Back in 1E it seemed that War only covers battles that are ideologically inspired. Is it the same in 2E?
                              The War Purview governs strife on a conceptual level as well as armed conflict. It may shape the tide of battles, uplift the destinies of soldiers and generals, or shatter fragile edifices of peace.


                              Neall Raemonn Price
                              Beleaguered Scion Developer

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Neall View Post
                                Both pre-Visitation and post, if the Scion decides to keep their nature a secret. And some might not either believe the Scion or care, though if they're open about their nature trouble will come to them sooner rather than later. Boons are expensive to maintain and can cause Fatebindings, so you don't pull them out for every Doubting Thomas. Some Scions might appear mostly like lucky and exceptional mortals most of the time.

                                Even acknowledged, Scions are shunted off to certain roles - a lawyer might be expected to handle negotiations with the Fair Folk over zoning laws (don't laugh - it really happens in Iceland), while law enforcement might be relegated to the "Special Operations Unit" and given the "really fuckin' weird" assignments with a wide degree of latitude. I don't expect a lot of Scion farmers to be PCs, but they probably end off fighting Ratatoskr's giant squirrel spawn.

                                Speaking as an Icelander, that does happen from time to time. I imagine carefully relocating suspected dwellings is a lot worse when they're confirmed and the owner can curse you if they don't like the new view.

                                Originally posted by Neall View Post
                                In general, the active or offensive theology predominates, so the Greek mystic would see the warrior as "wrong" or somehow spiritually complete yet incomplete at the same time. If the reverse occurred, for example, the Egyptian sorcerer would see large chunks of the soul missing, encompassing ba and ka or other elements.

                                I'm loathe to give hard-and-fast answers because those should be determined at the table. With so many mythologies and theologies intermixing, hard-and-fast rules are impossible to determine. I realize it's a bit of a judgment call on the part of the Storyguide, but that's the only way this will work.
                                ​I see! Thanks for the info. I get that it's never easy trying to hold together a lot of conflicting belief systems, so making it a matter of judgment calls is probably the right decision. Still, it's always interesting to get some insight into how the World hangs together.

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