Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Suggested resources for mythology

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Watcher View Post

    Nope, but, that confusion is entirely understandable! Griff would be able to explain to you in more detail, but essentially Tonatiuh is the Fifth Sun, and Huitzipochtli carries (I believe, he might just walk with it) the Fifth Sun through the sky.

    After the end of the Fourth Sun, the Teotl gathered in Teotihuacan, planning the creation of The Fifth Sun. Tecuciztecatl said that he would be the Fifth Sun, and the Teotl all agreed with this, sending Nanahuatzin to go with him. When the whole ritual situation was organized, and it was time for Tecuciztecatl hesitated to jump into the giant pyre in cowardice, but Nanahuatzin did not, and threw himself into the fire. Because of this, Nanahuatzin became the Fifth Sun, becoming Tonatiuh. Ashamed by this, Tecuciztecatl jumped in afterwards, and became the moon. The Teotl picked up a rabbit and hit the Moon, Nanahuatzin, with it to dim its brightness so that it would not challenge the sun's brightness. (There are other stories explaining the creation of the Moon, it comes up a lot)
    Thanks Watcher,and yeah i miss griff

    Comment


    • #32

      Comment


      • #33
        I just reread Scion 1e take on the Shen,it said The Jade Emperor is Guan Yu,but since that wasn't in his write up in 2e I was wondering if 1e was being innacurate?

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
          I just reread Scion 1e take on the Shen,it said The Jade Emperor is Guan Yu,but since that wasn't in his write up in 2e I was wondering if 1e was being innacurate?
          Sacerdos will be able to explain in more detail, but yeah, 1e was not being accurate there. If I remember my conversations with Sacerdos when doing preliminary examinations of the Shen for a revision, there were some rather obscure medieval period theologens who suggested that Guan Yu might be the next Jade Emperor, but that theological branch was not traditional, and didn't have any real staying power IIRC.

          The Jade Emperor is most certainly himself an independent being. Exceptionally old, exceptionally powerful. Sort of on the same tier with the Greek Primordials.

          But! Don't take my word entirely for it. Sacerdos will probably swing through later today with a better explanation.


          Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
          The Šiuneš, The Enduri, The Sgā’na Qeda’s, The Abosom, Lebor Óe In Dea, The Zemi, Nemetondevos: Revised, and Mysteries of the Otherworld.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Watcher View Post

            Sacerdos will be able to explain in more detail, but yeah, 1e was not being accurate there. If I remember my conversations with Sacerdos when doing preliminary examinations of the Shen for a revision, there were some rather obscure medieval period theologens who suggested that Guan Yu might be the next Jade Emperor, but that theological branch was not traditional, and didn't have any real staying power IIRC.

            The Jade Emperor is most certainly himself an independent being. Exceptionally old, exceptionally powerful. Sort of on the same tier with the Greek Primordials.

            But! Don't take my word entirely for it. Sacerdos will probably swing through later today with a better explanation.
            Thank you again,you're really kind

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
              Thank you again,you're really kind
              Oh, I am absolutely happy to help! I love being able to share the weird little tidbits of world mythology with people.


              Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
              The Šiuneš, The Enduri, The Sgā’na Qeda’s, The Abosom, Lebor Óe In Dea, The Zemi, Nemetondevos: Revised, and Mysteries of the Otherworld.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
                I just reread Scion 1e take on the Shen,it said The Jade Emperor is Guan Yu,but since that wasn't in his write up in 2e I was wondering if 1e was being innacurate?
                Originally posted by Watcher View Post

                Sacerdos will be able to explain in more detail, but yeah, 1e was not being accurate there. If I remember my conversations with Sacerdos when doing preliminary examinations of the Shen for a revision, there were some rather obscure medieval period theologens who suggested that Guan Yu might be the next Jade Emperor, but that theological branch was not traditional, and didn't have any real staying power IIRC.

                The Jade Emperor is most certainly himself an independent being. Exceptionally old, exceptionally powerful. Sort of on the same tier with the Greek Primordials.

                But! Don't take my word entirely for it. Sacerdos will probably swing through later today with a better explanation.
                Did somebody ask for an unnecessarily long post on Yu Di / Yu Huang / Da Di / Shang Di / the Jade Emperor / the Heavenly Emperor / that one dude with way too many cool names? Because that's what you folks just got yourselves into.

                So yeah, Scion 1E said Guan Yu is the Jade Emperor, and I'm still looking for any single solid source on that. Wikipedia mentions it, somewhere, but as a source, it only links to a Chinese website, which, it being in Chinese, I can't read. Also, it's Wikipedia, so I'm suspicious. I also once read a really off-handed footnote somewhere that claimed that in some 19th-century European traveler's account, some local temple attendant on Taiwan had claimed that the old Jade Emperor had stepped down and made way for the hugely popular Guan Yu - being elected into that office by a panel that included the Buddha, Jesus Christ, and the Prophet Muhammad. So, um, I'm also not going with that. That's not to say that the writers of 1E necessarily just pulled the idea out of thin air, I'm sure they had a source that made things clearer than, well, this mess, but in any case, it must be a pretty obscure reference, and not exactly one representative of the broad, popular opinion about the Jade Emperor all over China and SE-Asia. Also, if I might say as much, I find it to be a pretty boring road to take, because both Guan Yu and Yu Di are hugely interesting, colourful figures that are much more fun interacting with each other than being one person. But that begs the question for all of us: Who is Yu Di?

                Let's maybe start with some speculation on how 2E will treat Yu Di. He is mentioned several times in the recent Preview, not as an alias of Guan Yu, as far as I can see, but as an entity in its own right. Yet he isn't profiled, neither as a God, Titan, nor Primordial. The most interesting mention, in my opinion, is right in the beginning, when he called "one of the Three Pure Ones". From that I guess that 2E will conflate Yu Di with Yuanshi Tianzun, which is a quite reasonable choice, if still not the one I myself would have made. Yuanshi Tianzun, now, is the highest of the Sanqing, the Three Pure Ones, a triune Trinity of highest deities in Daoism (Laozi is, in fact, the main earthly incarnation of another one of them, Daode Tianzun). The Pure Ones personify the Way, the Dao, the cosmic principle itself; they started the process of creation, and live in the three Heavens right below the top one. Powerful Primordials for sure. It is indeed said that in the beginning, Yuanshi Tianzun himself was the Heavenly Emperor, but that he withdrew from creation after it had been set in motion, and passed the office on to his pupil, the Jade Emperor - that means, though, that with 2E's system of mantles, they can still be the same entity, in a way. Another part of that legend, however, is that Yu Di now sits upon a throne the left armrest of which names his predecessor, Yuanshi Tianzun, and the right armrest of which prophesises his successor, whoever that will be. Those who would have Guan Yu be the new Heavenly Emperor are exploiting that part of the legend.

                All of that still doesn't tell us who that Yu Di fella is, though, except someone vaguely Daoist. To explain his character in detail, I'd like to look at his history, for a moment. The oldest deity similar to Yu Di, and one whose name he still sometimes bears as an epithet, is Shang Di. Shang Di was a deity of the eponymous Shang Dynasty, the oldest archaeologically attested Chinese dynasty. Back then, the Chinese didn't worship gods in the usual sense, there was no nation-wide pantheon like the Greek one. People only worshipped their ancestors, back to the lineage founder, and Shang Di was the mythical lineage founder of the ruling family, and thus the ruler of all of Heaven full of ancestors itself. Religion in China changed from that time (2nd Millennium BCE) until the Imperial Era (beginning ca. 200 BCE), though, and the ancestral Shang Di was replaced by a vaguely circumscribed Heavenly Emperor, who didn't play much of a role in actual cult while other figures like Xi Wangmu and Huang Di were focussed on. It wasn't until the introduction of Buddhism, with its hierarchy of Devas headed by Indra/Shakra supporting the faith, and the development of the bureaucratically-inspired religious Daoism (both ca. 300 CE), that the office of a Ruler of Heaven became really important, though. Religious Daoism originally had four Heavenly Emperors, ruling the four directions in Heaven (not identical to the four directional emperors of ancient mythology, who are led by Huang Di, or the directional guardians like Azure Dragon, White Tiger, etc.), with the Three Pure Ones above them as the acutally most important beings. But as Daoism was adapted and simplified by popular religion, and as such popular deities (which did also include folks like Guan Yu, after all) gained state recognition, the heavenly hierarchy was slimmed down to one supreme Heavenly Emperor, Yu Di, who ruled from the Purple Palace of Heaven in the North over a structured hierarchy of ministers and officials.

                This long history explains the countless contradictions that riddle the image of the Jade Emperor. Daoism preferred for its deities to have sprung from original Chaos, but popular religion preferred for them to be deified humans, so I could rattle off at least three origin stories for Yu Di just off the top of my head. What everyone can agree on, though, is that he is supreme - he has a kind of Epic Administration, so to say, and it's claimed that he alone with his good governance keeps the other deities from warring among themselves. Or, well, most agree on that. There is a version where he weasels his way into office in spite of being incompetent. Still, pretty imperial. Dwells in a palace of stars, has constellations stitched into his robes - the constellations are heavenly office buildings in Chinese thought, all filled with celestial officials who all, ultimately, report back to Yu Di. That also means, though, that Yu Di, just like the ideal human emperor, stays eternally unmoved himself, has others do all the detailed work, and just makes decisions himself. Most important are the Three Officials of Heaven, Earth, and Water, who report on all things that happen everywhere to him (they're often said to be the deified forms of the sage emperors Yao, Shun, and Yu), and his son Zao Jun, the "Kitchen God" who spies on people's in their homes. Thus, Yu Di allots lifetime, luck, and health according to virtuousness of behaviour, and is on his birthday, the 9th of the First Lunar Month, asked to be merciful and liberal in that.

                Long story short, Yu Di is a broad and colourful figure I could hardly capture here, and you can have enormous amounts of fun with him, whether you see him as Shang Di, Yuanshi Tianzun, Guan Yu, or just himself, whether he springs from chaos, is deified for his administration skills, or cheats his way to the top. To finish off, an idea of what to do with Guan Yu now that he doesn't rule anymore: As I mentioned some time ago for the Gods of Wealth (http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/m...68#post1080768), the Celestial Bureaucracy, following the example of the real world imperial state, is in many conceptions of popular religion divided into a military and a civil branch, each headed by a powerful minister (the heads of the Heavenly Ministries of War and Literature, respectively) - the Martial Emperor of Heaven, Guan Yu, and the Civil Emperor of Heaven, Wenchang Wang. The two of them together act as something like the right and left hand of Yu Di. Have fun with that, I guess

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Sacerdos View Post



                  Did somebody ask for an unnecessarily long post on Yu Di / Yu Huang / Da Di / Shang Di / the Jade Emperor / the Heavenly Emperor / that one dude with way too many cool names? Because that's what you folks just got yourselves into.

                  So yeah, Scion 1E said Guan Yu is the Jade Emperor, and I'm still looking for any single solid source on that. Wikipedia mentions it, somewhere, but as a source, it only links to a Chinese website, which, it being in Chinese, I can't read. Also, it's Wikipedia, so I'm suspicious. I also once read a really off-handed footnote somewhere that claimed that in some 19th-century European traveler's account, some local temple attendant on Taiwan had claimed that the old Jade Emperor had stepped down and made way for the hugely popular Guan Yu - being elected into that office by a panel that included the Buddha, Jesus Christ, and the Prophet Muhammad. So, um, I'm also not going with that. That's not to say that the writers of 1E necessarily just pulled the idea out of thin air, I'm sure they had a source that made things clearer than, well, this mess, but in any case, it must be a pretty obscure reference, and not exactly one representative of the broad, popular opinion about the Jade Emperor all over China and SE-Asia. Also, if I might say as much, I find it to be a pretty boring road to take, because both Guan Yu and Yu Di are hugely interesting, colourful figures that are much more fun interacting with each other than being one person. But that begs the question for all of us: Who is Yu Di?

                  Let's maybe start with some speculation on how 2E will treat Yu Di. He is mentioned several times in the recent Preview, not as an alias of Guan Yu, as far as I can see, but as an entity in its own right. Yet he isn't profiled, neither as a God, Titan, nor Primordial. The most interesting mention, in my opinion, is right in the beginning, when he called "one of the Three Pure Ones". From that I guess that 2E will conflate Yu Di with Yuanshi Tianzun, which is a quite reasonable choice, if still not the one I myself would have made. Yuanshi Tianzun, now, is the highest of the Sanqing, the Three Pure Ones, a triune Trinity of highest deities in Daoism (Laozi is, in fact, the main earthly incarnation of another one of them, Daode Tianzun). The Pure Ones personify the Way, the Dao, the cosmic principle itself; they started the process of creation, and live in the three Heavens right below the top one. Powerful Primordials for sure. It is indeed said that in the beginning, Yuanshi Tianzun himself was the Heavenly Emperor, but that he withdrew from creation after it had been set in motion, and passed the office on to his pupil, the Jade Emperor - that means, though, that with 2E's system of mantles, they can still be the same entity, in a way. Another part of that legend, however, is that Yu Di now sits upon a throne the left armrest of which names his predecessor, Yuanshi Tianzun, and the right armrest of which prophesises his successor, whoever that will be. Those who would have Guan Yu be the new Heavenly Emperor are exploiting that part of the legend.

                  All of that still doesn't tell us who that Yu Di fella is, though, except someone vaguely Daoist. To explain his character in detail, I'd like to look at his history, for a moment. The oldest deity similar to Yu Di, and one whose name he still sometimes bears as an epithet, is Shang Di. Shang Di was a deity of the eponymous Shang Dynasty, the oldest archaeologically attested Chinese dynasty. Back then, the Chinese didn't worship gods in the usual sense, there was no nation-wide pantheon like the Greek one. People only worshipped their ancestors, back to the lineage founder, and Shang Di was the mythical lineage founder of the ruling family, and thus the ruler of all of Heaven full of ancestors itself. Religion in China changed from that time (2nd Millennium BCE) until the Imperial Era (beginning ca. 200 BCE), though, and the ancestral Shang Di was replaced by a vaguely circumscribed Heavenly Emperor, who didn't play much of a role in actual cult while other figures like Xi Wangmu and Huang Di were focussed on. It wasn't until the introduction of Buddhism, with its hierarchy of Devas headed by Indra/Shakra supporting the faith, and the development of the bureaucratically-inspired religious Daoism (both ca. 300 CE), that the office of a Ruler of Heaven became really important, though. Religious Daoism originally had four Heavenly Emperors, ruling the four directions in Heaven (not identical to the four directional emperors of ancient mythology, who are led by Huang Di, or the directional guardians like Azure Dragon, White Tiger, etc.), with the Three Pure Ones above them as the acutally most important beings. But as Daoism was adapted and simplified by popular religion, and as such popular deities (which did also include folks like Guan Yu, after all) gained state recognition, the heavenly hierarchy was slimmed down to one supreme Heavenly Emperor, Yu Di, who ruled from the Purple Palace of Heaven in the North over a structured hierarchy of ministers and officials.

                  This long history explains the countless contradictions that riddle the image of the Jade Emperor. Daoism preferred for its deities to have sprung from original Chaos, but popular religion preferred for them to be deified humans, so I could rattle off at least three origin stories for Yu Di just off the top of my head. What everyone can agree on, though, is that he is supreme - he has a kind of Epic Administration, so to say, and it's claimed that he alone with his good governance keeps the other deities from warring among themselves. Or, well, most agree on that. There is a version where he weasels his way into office in spite of being incompetent. Still, pretty imperial. Dwells in a palace of stars, has constellations stitched into his robes - the constellations are heavenly office buildings in Chinese thought, all filled with celestial officials who all, ultimately, report back to Yu Di. That also means, though, that Yu Di, just like the ideal human emperor, stays eternally unmoved himself, has others do all the detailed work, and just makes decisions himself. Most important are the Three Officials of Heaven, Earth, and Water, who report on all things that happen everywhere to him (they're often said to be the deified forms of the sage emperors Yao, Shun, and Yu), and his son Zao Jun, the "Kitchen God" who spies on people's in their homes. Thus, Yu Di allots lifetime, luck, and health according to virtuousness of behaviour, and is on his birthday, the 9th of the First Lunar Month, asked to be merciful and liberal in that.

                  Long story short, Yu Di is a broad and colourful figure I could hardly capture here, and you can have enormous amounts of fun with him, whether you see him as Shang Di, Yuanshi Tianzun, Guan Yu, or just himself, whether he springs from chaos, is deified for his administration skills, or cheats his way to the top. To finish off, an idea of what to do with Guan Yu now that he doesn't rule anymore: As I mentioned some time ago for the Gods of Wealth (http://forum.theonyxpath.com/forum/m...68#post1080768), the Celestial Bureaucracy, following the example of the real world imperial state, is in many conceptions of popular religion divided into a military and a civil branch, each headed by a powerful minister (the heads of the Heavenly Ministries of War and Literature, respectively) - the Martial Emperor of Heaven, Guan Yu, and the Civil Emperor of Heaven, Wenchang Wang. The two of them together act as something like the right and left hand of Yu Di. Have fun with that, I guess
                  Thank you!

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Oriares View Post
                    Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" features Greek and Norse myths.
                    This and Bullfinch's is where to start. Everyone is giving you absolutely fantastic sources, but if you want to cut your teeth, learn names, figure out the factions and politics within the Greco-Roman and Norse pantheon's, those two are where you start. They are super accessible. Hamilton's, in particular, will help you read the other sources and pantheon's more critically to help you get more from these fantastic sources people are giving you.

                    They are very basic, euro-centric primers. Expand outward from there. You will gain more from the other sources once you have a grip on the ones that most directly impact classical Western Civilization, and appreciate the nuances and insights of other cultures.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      I think Edith Hamilton's Mythology was one of the first non-"for kids" books on myth I read, back when I was in 6th or 7th grade. I don't think I read Bullfinch until I was in my late 30s. IIRC, Bullfinch also gives a basic overview of the Arthurian story and the basics of Charlemagne's Paladins.

                      There must be a way to work Charlemagne's Paladins into Scion. Just because Bradamante is one of classic literature's all time bad ass warrior women.

                      Also, Chinese mythology is somewhat confusing to outsiders.


                      What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                      Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

                        I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!


                        Remi. she/her. game designer.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
                          So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

                          I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!
                          Oh I wouldn't worry too much about that, Arthurian lore has recieved a lot of add ons and such over the ages.Let me put it like this depending on where you look Arthur became king by pulling the sword from the stone, except other stories have him recieve the sword from the Lady in the Lake. As a consequence the story tends to be mixed so Arthur draws a sword named Caliburn from the stone then gets it broken during his career and the Lady of the Lake remakes it into Excalibur. (And according to at least one class I took Excalibur/Caliburn is actually a fairly recent addition to the mythos, though because literature and mythology are insane recent means centuries.)

                          As far as places to start, I think Le mort Arthur is considered the major source these days though I haven't read it myself. Camelot or Excalibur were both films that cover or explain the basics of the legend. Honestly I feel like this is a legend that a lot of people get by cultural ozmosis at this point with just fragments of it being used or referenced.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
                            So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

                            I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!
                            If you are looking for a solid starting place for the source stories Lex, see if you can get your hands on The Mabinogion from Oxford World's Classics. It has the Mabinogion in it as one might expect from the name, but it also has a collection of early Arthurian legend. The earlier Arthurian bits, before the medieval period runs off and Lancelot/Tristan becomes the darling of medieval literature, is tied into the scraps of Welsh mythology we have left.

                            If you can't get your hands on the book, the names of the legends inside that probably would interest you the most are Peredur son of Efrog, The Dream of Emperor Maxen, Lludd and Llefelys, The Lady of the Well, Geraint son of Erbin, How Culhwch Won Olwen, and Rhonabwy's Dream. They are not all directly about Arthur, but they tell the story of his knights, his court, his family, and the island before Arthur's birth. If you can get your hands on the Mabinogion though, I would really suggest reading it if you are interested in learning about Arthur as Welsh-Manannan is listed as being one of his knights for example, it all ties together neatly.

                            The later stuff, actual Arthurian literature from the medieval period, I am less certain on where to start looking. The story of Tristan and Isolde are really important for Arthurian literature as sort of a 'Tone Setter' for all of the medieval romances. The other big bit of literature, originally in French, is Le Morte d'Arthur which comes out of the 15th century. It is a bit later, but it sort of becomes the 'Cannon Text,' for Arthur. Here is a digital version of it, I can't speak for how good the translation is, but it's free!

                            There is also some really promising work being started by someone I know contrasting the way Guinevere is depicted in the earliest texts, the late-medieval texts, and in modern pop culture. If that sort of thing interests you Lex, I can ask her about it in a few months and get back to you with some stuff on that.


                            Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
                            The Šiuneš, The Enduri, The Sgā’na Qeda’s, The Abosom, Lebor Óe In Dea, The Zemi, Nemetondevos: Revised, and Mysteries of the Otherworld.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Watcher . Since you're the Tuatha fan,can i know something about Dian Cecth? I Just realized the only thing i know about him is that he coudn't heal Nuadaa,are there any tales where Dian does heal people?

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
                                Watcher . Since you're the Tuatha fan,can i know something about Dian Cecth? I Just realized the only thing i know about him is that he coudn't heal Nuadaa,are there any tales where Dian does heal people?
                                Dian Cecht is a rather interesting figure, one of the most important members of the tribe according to the Tuatha themselves, but we don't really see a whole lot of him being amazing. Generally, we have three myths about Dian Cecht, not counting small regional place-name stories since there is always a mountain of those.

                                The first time we see Dian Cecht is the scene you mentioned where Nuada loses his hand to Sreng of the Mighty Blows, the champion of the Fir Bolg during the invasion of Ireland. Dian Cecht is described as being able to heal any wound except wounds of the brain, and wounds that hewed marrow. Nuada's missing hand falls into the second section, the hand cleaved off obviously cut through the bone, and thus it is outside the realm of Dian Cecht's skills as a physician. Nuada's hand does get replaced by his son Miach who uses a poem to regenerate the hand which infuriates Dian Cecht, leading him to murder his own son. There is some suspicion that this story is a far later medieval addition to the earlier medieval story since it makes pretty much zero sense, and seems to just to form some kind of symmetry with the rest of the text. Miach is a cool guy, he and his sister Airmed are awesome healers. As children they replace a man's eye with the eye of a cat after he had gone blind with a nip of surgery.

                                The second time we see Dian Cecht is what tells us how powerful he is. Dian Cecht is brought in on the war councils against the Fomorians, and during the pitched battle between the Tuatha and the Fomorians, Dian Cecht is noted as being one of the two figures who are causing the victory of the Tuatha (the other being Goibniu the smith, one of the most powerful and important of the Pantheon) as he is preforming some pretty amazing magic. He has had several pools of water dug, and filled them with herbs. He is having the dead and dying Tuatha brought to him, tossing them into the water, and pulling them out, resurrected, and ready to continue the fight. The Fomorians rate Dian Cecht bringing back all of the Tuatha dead, and Goibniu forging an infinite amount of 100% accurate and 100% lethal spears to be their main problems. (They try to assassinate Goibniu for this but fail) This is the big instance of Dian Cecht showing off how powerful he is, really important bit, without him the Pantheon would have fallen.

                                The third myth we see him in is a bit different. One of The Morrigu (I can't remember if the story is super clear who it is) is pregnant, and Dian Cecht works out that the kid has three snakes in his heart which will eat all of Ireland. So Dian Cecht carves the infant's heart out, kills the three serpents, and throws the corpses into a river causing the water to rage and boil with the venom. It's a smaller myth, it's actually from one of those place-name stories explaining the river, but it's interesting so I included it. I tend to hold this one against him since he is capable of bringing the dead back to life, but doesn't seem to care to try for the little kiddo. Just carves out his heart and leaves him dead.

                                So, yeah. He totally does heal people, he can heal people from death. He just can't do cut marrow, or damage to the brain. Which, honestly, make sense for the early Irish. Those sorts of wounds would be the really bad ones that they would know are borderline impossible to heal. There's also some musing that the brain-cutting has something to do with the Head Cult, but it's sort of up in the air since we don't know what the whole headhunting thing was about in the first place. Very important guy though, he and Goibniu are probably the most important Tuatha in a war. The two of them are the big powerhouses if the Pantheon ever has to go to war against someone else. Sadly, both are dead! Plague got the pair of them.


                                Scion 2e Homebrew Projects:
                                The Šiuneš, The Enduri, The Sgā’na Qeda’s, The Abosom, Lebor Óe In Dea, The Zemi, Nemetondevos: Revised, and Mysteries of the Otherworld.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X