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  • Wickedgrail
    replied
    Metamorphoses, Ovid. I learned that at school and it was actually the only book I was interested into.

    Leave a comment:


  • BloodiedPorcelain
    replied
    If you want to get as close to the original Irish myths as can be, try to find copies of Lebor gabála Érenn (The Book of the Taking Of Ireland). It's a tough thing to track down and you're basically guaranteed not to be able to find a reliable digital copy (I think I've invested at least $150 for copies of the whole thing), so be prepared to shell out a fair bit of cash. It's worth noting that these are based on stories that were altered by Christian monks, but they're still the closest we have and you don't risk running in to artistic license later authors added in to the stories.


    Originally posted by Watcher View Post

    Oh man, Crom Cruach, my absolute dire weakness. I'll check them out Nicolas, that sounds really neat. Crom Cruach is, like, I adore him. Even if he wasn't real at all, I got just a special part in my heart for him. I also really love puzzles like that, that sounds awesome!

    If you ever want to know anything about the Gauls, I have a ton of notes written on them for my eternal side research project!
    Fair warning, Merry Gentry is really better called Merry's Vagina Miracles. After the first couple books, it's 90% sexcapades followed by spontaneous magical happenings and limited story. Either Laurell got got lazy, or she got bored and hired a ghost writer and all they were given were loose instructions amounting to sidhe with Merry = spontaneous long dead magic waking up.
    Last edited by BloodiedPorcelain; 08-31-2017, 11:39 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Watcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
    damn i hope the nemetodevos get s good treatmeant on Scion Second Edition they seem fascinating and cool. oh since you recommended me a book I'll recomend you a book series. it's called Merry Gentry by Laurell Kaye Hamilton. it's all about God's from Europe trying to live their lives and find love. the first two books feature mannan mac lir,esus,nodens;conchenn;crom cruach. the whole gang. but they changed their names so you don't know which character is each god right away.this series is amazing for fans of the Celtic people;it's doubly amazing for someone who likes both the Celtics people and a good romantic tale
    Oh man, Crom Cruach, my absolute dire weakness. I'll check them out Nicolas, that sounds really neat. Crom Cruach is, like, I adore him. Even if he wasn't real at all, I got just a special part in my heart for him. I also really love puzzles like that, that sounds awesome!

    If you ever want to know anything about the Gauls, I have a ton of notes written on them for my eternal side research project!

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicolas Milioni
    replied
    Originally posted by Watcher View Post

    Ah, the Gauls. My eternal side-project. Okay, so.

    Esus is a God from Gaul. Not all of Gaul, somewhere in Gaul. There was no unified Gaulish Pantheon (there probably was no Irish one either, but that's a whole long story) instead there were regional Deities, and a few suspected 'Big' Deities who had a wide range of influence. Cernunnos is the big one of these, we just have depictions of him all across continental Europe. Esus is a semi-regional figure. There are decent amount of inscriptions of his name, but sadly the exact numbers are out of my hands for the moment. My book on the Gauls is currently taped up in a box, moving tomorrow. I can get the exact numbers in a few days though.

    Anyways, so, right. Esus, not a huge, massively widely ranged entity like Cernunnos, but still fairly 'big' for a Gaulish figure. There is a fair amount of arguments over just who he is though. I can enlighten a few details though, and get into some of the theories of who he is.

    He probably ins't part of a triad, the flaying is unlikely, but the woodsman thing is very likely. The big problem we have with the Gaulish religion is that all of our written sources are from the Romans, and they are lying out of their teeth, or just not understanding things. The triad suggestion comes from Lucan who claims Teutates, Esus, and Taranis are part of a trinity of sorts. After a lot of academic poking, and archeological work, we worked out that this was toss. Taranis is super obscure and very-very rarely attested. His name is only mentioned seven times, ever, in all inscriptions. Teutates is suspected of not even being a Deity, but a 'class' of Deities. Teutates means 'Tribe God' literally which people thought meant he was a God of civilization, but the more accurate translation would be '[The] Tribe['s] God," and is talking about your local Deity. Not a big God of all Tribes, but your own local figure who is your tribe's patron. We have a ton of these guys all across Gaul, from Albiorix to Toutiorix. Teutates as a name is only inscribed once, so the running theory is that Lucian lost something in translation. Lastly, Lucian, who claims this triad, is claiming that they are the three main Gods of all Gaul, and they relate to Mars, Jupiter, and Mercury. This is probably the case of him hearing things third hand, misunderstanding things, or making things up. The degree to which he discusses the human sacrifices really pushes it into the realm of "Probably a Hatchet Job," casting the Gauls as barbaric to justify the conquest. While there were, of course, human sacrifices (everyone does it at one point more or less) we don't have a ton of archeological record for it. It's more likely that item and animal sacrifice were far more important to the Gauls.*

    So, back to Esus. He probably wasn't part of a trinity, but was probably fairly important. But, who was he? The leading argument I support is that he has another name, Lug. Caesar clams that Mercury is the chief God of the Gauls, which then ties back with the suggestion that one of the three members of Lucian's trinity has something to with Mercury. Since Taranis = Jupiter (name connection to the idea of storms), and Teutates = Mars (as a nationalistic, civic figure since Lucian was messing up Teutates for a Who when they are a What), then Lucian's Esus = Mercury. Caesar's Mercury is the inventor of all arts, which ties back in with the Irish Lugh's claim of being the master of all arts (more accurately I would say 'Professions'). This angle as a God of Crafts links into the one depiction we have on Esus, on the Pillar of the Boatman IIRC, of him hewing trees with an axe.

    So, the theory goes that Esus and Lug are the same person. This would further be supported by the connections we can see between the Irish Lugh and Esus. Esus' name has an interesting derived word, Esugenus, meaning 'Begotten of Esus' which is a name for the local ruling class of Chieftians. So, there is a connection between Esus and the notion of Chieftians, and Lugh has his whole Kingship angle going on with him over in Ireland. This also helps explain why Lug is really obscure a figure, barely ever mentioned except by Caesar. If Esus = Lug then Caesar claiming this really minor-obscure figure is very important and widespread makes a bit more sense.

    In sum. Esus probably = Lug. They get the name Esus-Lug in Academia due to this. Esus-Lug is a Craftsman God, which ties in with his forestry and cutting down trees. Either to clear land to farm, or to use the wood for carpentry (barrel construction is big in Gaul and Ireland), or possibly both. Both work in the idea of Esus-Lug that we can work out. Ontop of this, Esus-Lug has something to do with rule, or authority as the noble classes claimed some sort of literal, or metaphoric descent from him.

    If you want to learn more about the Gauls, I highly suggest Celtic Gods and Heroes by Marie-Louise Sjoestedt. It is a collection of her papers and lectures, she was a young, promising French Academic in the field, but sadly died very young. I loved reading her work, utterly great. It's a bit old, but, the field of Gaulish Religious Practices is a bit Glacial. It's one of the most enjoyable things I have read, utterly loved it.

    * A mention about the Gaulish Sacrifices. So, Sacrifices look super-important for the Gauls, right? Tons of sacrificed items, and animals in Gaul. Problem is that this doesn't mean that it was actually a big deal. All we have left are archeological findings, and sacrifices leave archeological record. Maybe the Gauls had complex poetry-prayers, or special trees, or dances, or songs, self-mutilation, anything. So many religious practices leave no archeological record, most of them don't really, so we can't conclude that Sacrifice was important to the Gauls because of this. They did it, yes, of course! But, was it important? We can't know. Maybe it was just a little side thing like lighting candles in a Catholic church.
    damn i hope the nemetodevos get s good treatmeant on Scion Second Edition they seem fascinating and cool. oh since you recommended me a book I'll recomend you a book series. it's called Merry Gentry by Laurell Kaye Hamilton. it's all about God's from Europe trying to live their lives and find love. the first two books feature mannan mac lir,esus,nodens;conchenn;crom cruach. the whole gang. but they changed their names so you don't know which character is each god right away.this series is amazing for fans of the Celtic people;it's doubly amazing for someone who likes both the Celtics people and a good romantic tale

    Leave a comment:


  • Watcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
    Okay, If it insnt too much trouble,what you can tell me about Esus? One of my favorite books hás a character based on him but i can find very little-wolfy.tumblr.com about him. I know hes partem of a tríad. That people worshipped him by flailing others and that he is show as a Woodsman. Is there anythings else?
    Ah, the Gauls. My eternal side-project. Okay, so.

    Esus is a God from Gaul. Not all of Gaul, somewhere in Gaul. There was no unified Gaulish Pantheon (there probably was no Irish one either, but that's a whole long story) instead there were regional Deities, and a few suspected 'Big' Deities who had a wide range of influence. Cernunnos is the big one of these, we just have depictions of him all across continental Europe. Esus is a semi-regional figure. There are decent amount of inscriptions of his name, but sadly the exact numbers are out of my hands for the moment. My book on the Gauls is currently taped up in a box, moving tomorrow. I can get the exact numbers in a few days though.

    Anyways, so, right. Esus, not a huge, massively widely ranged entity like Cernunnos, but still fairly 'big' for a Gaulish figure. There is a fair amount of arguments over just who he is though. I can enlighten a few details though, and get into some of the theories of who he is.

    He probably ins't part of a triad, the flaying is unlikely, but the woodsman thing is very likely. The big problem we have with the Gaulish religion is that all of our written sources are from the Romans, and they are lying out of their teeth, or just not understanding things. The triad suggestion comes from Lucan who claims Teutates, Esus, and Taranis are part of a trinity of sorts. After a lot of academic poking, and archeological work, we worked out that this was toss. Taranis is super obscure and very-very rarely attested. His name is only mentioned seven times, ever, in all inscriptions. Teutates is suspected of not even being a Deity, but a 'class' of Deities. Teutates means 'Tribe God' literally which people thought meant he was a God of civilization, but the more accurate translation would be '[The] Tribe['s] God," and is talking about your local Deity. Not a big God of all Tribes, but your own local figure who is your tribe's patron. We have a ton of these guys all across Gaul, from Albiorix to Toutiorix. Teutates as a name is only inscribed once, so the running theory is that Lucian lost something in translation. Lastly, Lucian, who claims this triad, is claiming that they are the three main Gods of all Gaul, and they relate to Mars, Jupiter, and Mercury. This is probably the case of him hearing things third hand, misunderstanding things, or making things up. The degree to which he discusses the human sacrifices really pushes it into the realm of "Probably a Hatchet Job," casting the Gauls as barbaric to justify the conquest. While there were, of course, human sacrifices (everyone does it at one point more or less) we don't have a ton of archeological record for it. It's more likely that item and animal sacrifice were far more important to the Gauls.*

    So, back to Esus. He probably wasn't part of a trinity, but was probably fairly important. But, who was he? The leading argument I support is that he has another name, Lug. Caesar clams that Mercury is the chief God of the Gauls, which then ties back with the suggestion that one of the three members of Lucian's trinity has something to with Mercury. Since Taranis = Jupiter (name connection to the idea of storms), and Teutates = Mars (as a nationalistic, civic figure since Lucian was messing up Teutates for a Who when they are a What), then Lucian's Esus = Mercury. Caesar's Mercury is the inventor of all arts, which ties back in with the Irish Lugh's claim of being the master of all arts (more accurately I would say 'Professions'). This angle as a God of Crafts links into the one depiction we have on Esus, on the Pillar of the Boatman IIRC, of him hewing trees with an axe.

    So, the theory goes that Esus and Lug are the same person. This would further be supported by the connections we can see between the Irish Lugh and Esus. Esus' name has an interesting derived word, Esugenus, meaning 'Begotten of Esus' which is a name for the local ruling class of Chieftians. So, there is a connection between Esus and the notion of Chieftians, and Lugh has his whole Kingship angle going on with him over in Ireland. This also helps explain why Lug is really obscure a figure, barely ever mentioned except by Caesar. If Esus = Lug then Caesar claiming this really minor-obscure figure is very important and widespread makes a bit more sense.

    In sum. Esus probably = Lug. They get the name Esus-Lug in Academia due to this. Esus-Lug is a Craftsman God, which ties in with his forestry and cutting down trees. Either to clear land to farm, or to use the wood for carpentry (barrel construction is big in Gaul and Ireland), or possibly both. Both work in the idea of Esus-Lug that we can work out. Ontop of this, Esus-Lug has something to do with rule, or authority as the noble classes claimed some sort of literal, or metaphoric descent from him.

    If you want to learn more about the Gauls, I highly suggest Celtic Gods and Heroes by Marie-Louise Sjoestedt. It is a collection of her papers and lectures, she was a young, promising French Academic in the field, but sadly died very young. I loved reading her work, utterly great. It's a bit old, but, the field of Gaulish Religious Practices is a bit Glacial. It's one of the most enjoyable things I have read, utterly loved it.

    * A mention about the Gaulish Sacrifices. So, Sacrifices look super-important for the Gauls, right? Tons of sacrificed items, and animals in Gaul. Problem is that this doesn't mean that it was actually a big deal. All we have left are archeological findings, and sacrifices leave archeological record. Maybe the Gauls had complex poetry-prayers, or special trees, or dances, or songs, self-mutilation, anything. So many religious practices leave no archeological record, most of them don't really, so we can't conclude that Sacrifice was important to the Gauls because of this. They did it, yes, of course! But, was it important? We can't know. Maybe it was just a little side thing like lighting candles in a Catholic church.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicolas Milioni
    replied
    Originally posted by Watcher View Post
    Happy to help! Just shout if you have any other questions, I always love helping people approach mythology.
    Okay, If it insnt too much trouble,what you can tell me about Esus? One of my favorite books hás a character based on him but i can find very little-wolfy.tumblr.com about him. I know hes partem of a tríad. That people worshipped him by flailing others and that he is show as a Woodsman. Is there anythings else?

    Leave a comment:


  • Watcher
    replied
    Happy to help! Just shout if you have any other questions, I always love helping people approach mythology.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicolas Milioni
    replied
    Originally posted by Watcher View Post

    Dian Cecht is a rather interesting figure, one of the most important members of the tribe according to the Tuatha themselves, but we don't really see a whole lot of him being amazing. Generally, we have three myths about Dian Cecht, not counting small regional place-name stories since there is always a mountain of those.

    The first time we see Dian Cecht is the scene you mentioned where Nuada loses his hand to Sreng of the Mighty Blows, the champion of the Fir Bolg during the invasion of Ireland. Dian Cecht is described as being able to heal any wound except wounds of the brain, and wounds that hewed marrow. Nuada's missing hand falls into the second section, the hand cleaved off obviously cut through the bone, and thus it is outside the realm of Dian Cecht's skills as a physician. Nuada's hand does get replaced by his son Miach who uses a poem to regenerate the hand which infuriates Dian Cecht, leading him to murder his own son. There is some suspicion that this story is a far later medieval addition to the earlier medieval story since it makes pretty much zero sense, and seems to just to form some kind of symmetry with the rest of the text. Miach is a cool guy, he and his sister Airmed are awesome healers. As children they replace a man's eye with the eye of a cat after he had gone blind with a nip of surgery.

    The second time we see Dian Cecht is what tells us how powerful he is. Dian Cecht is brought in on the war councils against the Fomorians, and during the pitched battle between the Tuatha and the Fomorians, Dian Cecht is noted as being one of the two figures who are causing the victory of the Tuatha (the other being Goibniu the smith, one of the most powerful and important of the Pantheon) as he is preforming some pretty amazing magic. He has had several pools of water dug, and filled them with herbs. He is having the dead and dying Tuatha brought to him, tossing them into the water, and pulling them out, resurrected, and ready to continue the fight. The Fomorians rate Dian Cecht bringing back all of the Tuatha dead, and Goibniu forging an infinite amount of 100% accurate and 100% lethal spears to be their main problems. (They try to assassinate Goibniu for this but fail) This is the big instance of Dian Cecht showing off how powerful he is, really important bit, without him the Pantheon would have fallen.

    The third myth we see him in is a bit different. One of The Morrigu (I can't remember if the story is super clear who it is) is pregnant, and Dian Cecht works out that the kid has three snakes in his heart which will eat all of Ireland. So Dian Cecht carves the infant's heart out, kills the three serpents, and throws the corpses into a river causing the water to rage and boil with the venom. It's a smaller myth, it's actually from one of those place-name stories explaining the river, but it's interesting so I included it. I tend to hold this one against him since he is capable of bringing the dead back to life, but doesn't seem to care to try for the little kiddo. Just carves out his heart and leaves him dead.

    So, yeah. He totally does heal people, he can heal people from death. He just can't do cut marrow, or damage to the brain. Which, honestly, make sense for the early Irish. Those sorts of wounds would be the really bad ones that they would know are borderline impossible to heal. There's also some musing that the brain-cutting has something to do with the Head Cult, but it's sort of up in the air since we don't know what the whole headhunting thing was about in the first place. Very important guy though, he and Goibniu are probably the most important Tuatha in a war. The two of them are the big powerhouses if the Pantheon ever has to go to war against someone else. Sadly, both are dead! Plague got the pair of them.
    Thank you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Watcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Nicolas Milioni View Post
    Watcher . Since you're the Tuatha fan,can i know something about Dian Cecth? I Just realized the only thing i know about him is that he coudn't heal Nuadaa,are there any tales where Dian does heal people?
    Dian Cecht is a rather interesting figure, one of the most important members of the tribe according to the Tuatha themselves, but we don't really see a whole lot of him being amazing. Generally, we have three myths about Dian Cecht, not counting small regional place-name stories since there is always a mountain of those.

    The first time we see Dian Cecht is the scene you mentioned where Nuada loses his hand to Sreng of the Mighty Blows, the champion of the Fir Bolg during the invasion of Ireland. Dian Cecht is described as being able to heal any wound except wounds of the brain, and wounds that hewed marrow. Nuada's missing hand falls into the second section, the hand cleaved off obviously cut through the bone, and thus it is outside the realm of Dian Cecht's skills as a physician. Nuada's hand does get replaced by his son Miach who uses a poem to regenerate the hand which infuriates Dian Cecht, leading him to murder his own son. There is some suspicion that this story is a far later medieval addition to the earlier medieval story since it makes pretty much zero sense, and seems to just to form some kind of symmetry with the rest of the text. Miach is a cool guy, he and his sister Airmed are awesome healers. As children they replace a man's eye with the eye of a cat after he had gone blind with a nip of surgery.

    The second time we see Dian Cecht is what tells us how powerful he is. Dian Cecht is brought in on the war councils against the Fomorians, and during the pitched battle between the Tuatha and the Fomorians, Dian Cecht is noted as being one of the two figures who are causing the victory of the Tuatha (the other being Goibniu the smith, one of the most powerful and important of the Pantheon) as he is preforming some pretty amazing magic. He has had several pools of water dug, and filled them with herbs. He is having the dead and dying Tuatha brought to him, tossing them into the water, and pulling them out, resurrected, and ready to continue the fight. The Fomorians rate Dian Cecht bringing back all of the Tuatha dead, and Goibniu forging an infinite amount of 100% accurate and 100% lethal spears to be their main problems. (They try to assassinate Goibniu for this but fail) This is the big instance of Dian Cecht showing off how powerful he is, really important bit, without him the Pantheon would have fallen.

    The third myth we see him in is a bit different. One of The Morrigu (I can't remember if the story is super clear who it is) is pregnant, and Dian Cecht works out that the kid has three snakes in his heart which will eat all of Ireland. So Dian Cecht carves the infant's heart out, kills the three serpents, and throws the corpses into a river causing the water to rage and boil with the venom. It's a smaller myth, it's actually from one of those place-name stories explaining the river, but it's interesting so I included it. I tend to hold this one against him since he is capable of bringing the dead back to life, but doesn't seem to care to try for the little kiddo. Just carves out his heart and leaves him dead.

    So, yeah. He totally does heal people, he can heal people from death. He just can't do cut marrow, or damage to the brain. Which, honestly, make sense for the early Irish. Those sorts of wounds would be the really bad ones that they would know are borderline impossible to heal. There's also some musing that the brain-cutting has something to do with the Head Cult, but it's sort of up in the air since we don't know what the whole headhunting thing was about in the first place. Very important guy though, he and Goibniu are probably the most important Tuatha in a war. The two of them are the big powerhouses if the Pantheon ever has to go to war against someone else. Sadly, both are dead! Plague got the pair of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nicolas Milioni
    replied
    Watcher . Since you're the Tuatha fan,can i know something about Dian Cecth? I Just realized the only thing i know about him is that he coudn't heal Nuadaa,are there any tales where Dian does heal people?

    Leave a comment:


  • Watcher
    replied
    Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
    So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

    I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!
    If you are looking for a solid starting place for the source stories Lex, see if you can get your hands on The Mabinogion from Oxford World's Classics. It has the Mabinogion in it as one might expect from the name, but it also has a collection of early Arthurian legend. The earlier Arthurian bits, before the medieval period runs off and Lancelot/Tristan becomes the darling of medieval literature, is tied into the scraps of Welsh mythology we have left.

    If you can't get your hands on the book, the names of the legends inside that probably would interest you the most are Peredur son of Efrog, The Dream of Emperor Maxen, Lludd and Llefelys, The Lady of the Well, Geraint son of Erbin, How Culhwch Won Olwen, and Rhonabwy's Dream. They are not all directly about Arthur, but they tell the story of his knights, his court, his family, and the island before Arthur's birth. If you can get your hands on the Mabinogion though, I would really suggest reading it if you are interested in learning about Arthur as Welsh-Manannan is listed as being one of his knights for example, it all ties together neatly.

    The later stuff, actual Arthurian literature from the medieval period, I am less certain on where to start looking. The story of Tristan and Isolde are really important for Arthurian literature as sort of a 'Tone Setter' for all of the medieval romances. The other big bit of literature, originally in French, is Le Morte d'Arthur which comes out of the 15th century. It is a bit later, but it sort of becomes the 'Cannon Text,' for Arthur. Here is a digital version of it, I can't speak for how good the translation is, but it's free!

    There is also some really promising work being started by someone I know contrasting the way Guinevere is depicted in the earliest texts, the late-medieval texts, and in modern pop culture. If that sort of thing interests you Lex, I can ask her about it in a few months and get back to you with some stuff on that.

    Leave a comment:


  • nalak42
    replied
    Originally posted by atamajakki View Post
    So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

    I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!
    Oh I wouldn't worry too much about that, Arthurian lore has recieved a lot of add ons and such over the ages.Let me put it like this depending on where you look Arthur became king by pulling the sword from the stone, except other stories have him recieve the sword from the Lady in the Lake. As a consequence the story tends to be mixed so Arthur draws a sword named Caliburn from the stone then gets it broken during his career and the Lady of the Lake remakes it into Excalibur. (And according to at least one class I took Excalibur/Caliburn is actually a fairly recent addition to the mythos, though because literature and mythology are insane recent means centuries.)

    As far as places to start, I think Le mort Arthur is considered the major source these days though I haven't read it myself. Camelot or Excalibur were both films that cover or explain the basics of the legend. Honestly I feel like this is a legend that a lot of people get by cultural ozmosis at this point with just fragments of it being used or referenced.

    Leave a comment:


  • atamajakki
    replied
    So this takes a lot of courage for me to admit, but...

    I'm a bad nerd who doesn't know anything about Arthur. I know he's a knight with a magic sword and he has some other knight buddies and the Grail is in the mix somehow, and that's about it. There's a lot of Arthurian works out that that reinvent or subvert the myth, but I want a solid starting place for what the source is. With all th hype around a possible Arthurian book for Demigod, I'd love some help getting a head start on it!

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    I think Edith Hamilton's Mythology was one of the first non-"for kids" books on myth I read, back when I was in 6th or 7th grade. I don't think I read Bullfinch until I was in my late 30s. IIRC, Bullfinch also gives a basic overview of the Arthurian story and the basics of Charlemagne's Paladins.

    There must be a way to work Charlemagne's Paladins into Scion. Just because Bradamante is one of classic literature's all time bad ass warrior women.

    Also, Chinese mythology is somewhat confusing to outsiders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mister Lion
    replied
    Originally posted by Oriares View Post
    Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" features Greek and Norse myths.
    This and Bullfinch's is where to start. Everyone is giving you absolutely fantastic sources, but if you want to cut your teeth, learn names, figure out the factions and politics within the Greco-Roman and Norse pantheon's, those two are where you start. They are super accessible. Hamilton's, in particular, will help you read the other sources and pantheon's more critically to help you get more from these fantastic sources people are giving you.

    They are very basic, euro-centric primers. Expand outward from there. You will gain more from the other sources once you have a grip on the ones that most directly impact classical Western Civilization, and appreciate the nuances and insights of other cultures.

    Leave a comment:

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