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Suggested resources for mythology

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Originally posted by Lula View Post
    The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis: A Harvard botanist goes to Haiti to unravel the mystery of the zombie, and learns way more than he expected.
    The Wes Craven movie adaption isn't that bad either.

    As for the Greek gods, George O'Connor's Olympians graphic novel series is some of the best work with the characters I've seen in years.

    Also, the Overly Sarcastic Productions channel onYouTube. They've done a number of videos covering myths from different cultures.

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  • Sacerdos
    replied
    Originally posted by TheGraySoul View Post
    Does anyone have any good sources for the Loa or Haitian Vodou?
    "Divine Horsemen" by Maya Deren is supposed to be a great introduction, although I haven't read it myself yet.

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  • Lyrics Of War
    replied
    On the topic of Norse + white supremacy, since it was brought up. If you are looking to avoid that then nix anything neo pagan from your research. Pick a few archaeologists to work with. Jesse Byock is at ucla, and does (from what I can tell) a majority of translation work. He also has old Norse text books for sale, as in language learning. Neil price is another solid selection, and has a compilation of essays out called (iirc) the Viking world. Multitude of essays on the Norse world, in all fassets, all written by PhDs.

    Again, avoid anything from the metaphysical section. You may have to do some archaeological and history reading to get a full spectrum, as the prose Edda is a biased source.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nyrufa
    replied
    Originally posted by TheGraySoul View Post
    Does anyone have any good sources for the Loa or Haitian Vodou?

    Don't piss off a Haitian priest. They'll throw pufferfish venom in your face and you'll end up getting buried alive!
    Last edited by Nyrufa; 07-24-2016, 02:11 PM.

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  • Lula
    replied
    Originally posted by TheGraySoul View Post
    Does anyone have any good sources for the Loa or Haitian Vodou?
    Mama Lola: A Vodou Priestess in Brooklyn by Karen McCarthy Brown: A great look at what real life is like for a mambo. Similar to The Altar of My Soul, but a bit more scholarly.
    Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou by Donald J Cosentino: Visual atlas of vodou.
    The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis: A Harvard botanist goes to Haiti to unravel the mystery of the zombie, and learns way more than he expected.
    Last edited by Lula; 07-24-2016, 02:08 PM.

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  • TheGraySoul
    replied
    Does anyone have any good sources for the Loa or Haitian Vodou?

    Leave a comment:


  • Robert Vance
    replied
    Originally posted by Lula View Post
    For the theoi and æsir, D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths and D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths are lavishly illustrated children's books which remain my favorite sources about those two groups (and, in fact, among my favorite books I've ever read, ever). If you have children, please get them these books. Even if your children are now 30.
    Those two were some of my first bedtime stories (along with Alexander Lloyd's Book of Three), and look where I ended up.

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  • Lula
    replied
    For àwọn òrìṣà, Flash of the Spirit by Robert Farris Thompson is a good start that focuses on sacred art, but also provides a great introduction to àwọn òrìṣà's characters. The Altar of My Soul by Marta Moreno Vega is a more organic, personal narrative by a Lukumí cleric which also has a useful summary of information about orichás in a Cuban and Puerto Rican context. Finally, Tales of Yorùbá Gods and Heroes is an eminently readable and clear storybook introduction to àwọn òrìṣà in a West African context.

    For the shén, the first few chapters of Journey to the West are excellent. As soon as they actually leave on the journey, though, you can read a chapter or two and then skip to the end, although the chapter about Womanland is worth stopping for. Seriously. I have read the entire thing. It was a mistake.

    For the theoi and æsir, D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths and D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths are lavishly illustrated children's books which remain my favorite sources about those two groups (and, in fact, among my favorite books I've ever read, ever). If you have children, please get them these books. Even if your children are now 30.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sacerdos
    replied
    Originally posted by Nyrufa View Post
    Well, while I was waiting for my Scion 1st edition books to come by mail, I played Smite a lot. They seem to have some interesting lore about the various mythologies for each character, and it's free to play.
    I would classify that more as "inspiration" than "source", to be sure Although inspirational media would definitely worthy of discussion as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nyrufa
    replied
    Well, while I was waiting for my Scion 1st edition books to come by mail, I played Smite a lot. They seem to have some interesting lore about the various mythologies for each character, and it's free to play.

    Leave a comment:


  • atamajakki
    replied
    I wish this could be stickied.

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  • Oriares
    replied
    Edith Hamilton's "Mythology" features Greek and Norse myths.
    Last edited by Oriares; 06-25-2016, 01:28 AM.

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  • An Fhuiseog
    replied
    For Mesopotamia I've always found the following good:
    Myths from Mesopotamia Creation, The Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others by Stephanie Dalley

    As a good starter on several pantheons:
    Mythology The Illustrated Anthology of World Myth and Storytelling by C. Scott Littleton. I think this book gives a good solid foundtion with several myth cycles.

    Just to note, the Fionn MacCumhail cycle in Irish myth is a good bit younger than the Tuatha Dé Dannan material (and much larger) so it thematically doesn't mesh with them. It's a bit like what's in Grimm's Fairy Tales vs the actual Germanic gods. (Also most of the Fionn MacCumhail stories are untranslated).

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  • 3Comrades
    replied
    The Netjer is hard because there is a lot of lit for it but they change perhaps more than other gods. Their stories are perhaps more disjointed and their connection to larger primal roles is more innate. I love them so much, but sometimes they feel more like forces than personalities.

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  • MadxHatter0
    replied
    As far as The Netjeru go, a website I would recommend and one many Kemetics actually recommend is Henadology(https://henadology.wordpress.com/theology/netjeru/). It's a great website with an encylopedia of gods and goddesses and even terrible horrible things like Ap*p whose name should never be truly written out . The book, The Complete Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Egypt is also recommended by a lot of people in the Kemetic community.

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