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How 'aware' is The World?

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  • How 'aware' is The World?

    Of all the fun things in Scion 2e, the one I'm most excited for is more information on the actual setting this time around. Neall has previously said that there's no 'Masquerade' to speak of, but I have to wonder what the average mortal knows about. Polytheism has survived in a big way compared to our reality, but would Zeus showing up and announcing himself be something plausible or would it be as believable to someone of The World as the average 'second coming of Christ' is to one of us? Are say, satyrs or naga out there living in their own little known communities, or do nutjobs in tinfoil hats spread blurry footage of valkyries instead of aliens? Is a Scion throwing fire from her fingertips extraordinary but possible, or would people view that as an impossible, crazy thing?



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  • #2
    Gods play it careful with direct revelation to the mortal world because that invites Fatebinding (which is much more powerful on their level than for Origin/Hero level Scions). So there should be room for atheists or monotheists to exist in the World without that person needing to delusionally deny the blatantly obvious (at least for npcs... pcs are going to be faced with divinities and their world-view will need to account for them).

    I am really curious too about the degree to which the nonhuman races like Alfar, Satyrs, Naga, etc actively conceal their existence or not, and if they do, why do they (since they don't have to worry about Fatebinding from "revelation" the way gods do).


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    • #3
      I imagine that there's no Masquerade in the sense of most supernatural beings are deliberately taking actions to keep humans unaware.

      If there IS one, it probably lies in humans' ability to put blinders on. That's not a dwarf, that's a little person. That elf? Just a VERY pretty Swedish man.

      That's not a dryad, that's a nudist farmer who REALLY needs to find Jesus and learn to throw a robe on when the mailman visits. (The "Dryad who needs to find Jesus" courtesy of a PC in the group I'm part of)


      Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
        I am really curious too about the degree to which the nonhuman races like Alfar, Satyrs, Naga, etc actively conceal their existence or not, and if they do, why do they (since they don't have to worry about Fatebinding from "revelation" the way gods do).
        Quoth Neall:

        In the cracks of the World are Creatures of Legend, sitting ever within humanity’s collective peripheral vision. They hide in plain sight, when they bother to hide at all. Dwarves and elves are in towns in the Scandinavian countries, sometimes even plying their trade. Centaurs herd in the plains of Thessaly, where there are so few cameras. Tengu nests nestle among Japanese skyscrapers. Colonies of satyrs in the mountains of Greece, fighting for territory with the aforementioned centaurs who lope across the plains. In the American West, a different kind of centaur rides the highways on two wheels, chrome where human legs should be and oil pumping in their hearts.


        Scion 2E: What We Know - A wiki compiling info on second edition Scion.

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        • #5
          *deleting angry ranting about urban fantasy setting getting human nature backwards*


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          • #6
            Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
            *deleting angry ranting about urban fantasy setting getting human nature backwards*
            Now you have me intrigued.

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            • #7
              The existence of real magical creatures isn't enough to stop conspiracy theorists from obsessing over fake ones.


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              • #8
                Originally posted by Robert Vance View Post
                The existence of real magical creatures isn't enough to stop conspiracy theorists from obsessing over fake ones.
                If anything it'll lead to even crazier fake ones.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by vonpenguin View Post

                  If anything it'll lead to even crazier fake ones.
                  "Psh, forget those doctored pictures of pixies. I've got REAL evidence that the President and the British Prime Minister are reptilians wearing human skinsuits!"


                  Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post

                    Now you have me intrigued.
                    Basically the idea that humanity as a group will stubbornly refuse to believe in magic that is in front of their face to cling to the idea of a safer more predictable world, is the opposite of how collective human nature works.

                    Humans as groups are paranoid, not stubbornly skeptical trying to believe they're safer than they are.

                    Furthermore belief in the supernatural only historically declined at all in response to empiricism debunking it. In a world where the supernatural was real, empiricism and the enlightenment wouldn't have produced those results in the first place. Science and the "supernatural" are only at odds in our consciousness because we live in a world where the former debunks the latter. If the latter existed the former would reveal it, not debunk it.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                      If the latter existed the former would reveal it, not debunk it.
                      We live in a world where many people believe, despite literally all the evidence debunking it, that vaccines cause autism. (And that is the last I will get into that because thinking on that topic makes me see red and I just start shrieking like a mandrake)

                      Humans can be very clingy with their worldviews.

                      Edit: I mean I won't say you're wrong, that's a very valid mindset. I'm just saying that people are very capable of cherry-picking things that support their preconceptions and bias while dismissing things that fly in the face of it.
                      Last edited by Kyman201; 09-23-2016, 03:16 PM.


                      Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks, glamourweaver. I appreciate the answer.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kyman201 View Post

                          We live in a world where many people believe, despite literally all the evidence debunking it, that vaccines cause autism. (And that is the last I will get into that because thinking on that topic makes me see red and I just start shrieking like a mandrake)

                          Humans can be very clingy with their worldviews.
                          that was the point of the first part of my post. Humans are paranoid and superstitious.

                          Refusing to believe in a world of magic that empirically DOES exist isn't that. The idea that it didn't exist would never even have arisen in the first place since empiricism would be on he side that it does, so where would the anti-supernatural arguments have even arisen from?


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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post
                            Refusing to believe in a world of magic that empirically DOES exist isn't that. The idea that it didn't exist would never even have arisen in the first place since empiricism would be on he side that it does, so where would the anti-supernatural arguments have even arisen from?
                            That, I honestly don't have an answer for. I guess I was more thinking of your post saying that it "tends to ignore human nature", which stuck with me because no, clinging to an incorrect worldview in spite of overwhelming evidence is very human.

                            Guess we'll have to see if there's a reason for it in the Origins book.


                            Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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                            • #15
                              My reading is that it isn't so much humans refuse to accept supernatural events, but rather they do exist, and have existed so long no one cares. They exist either intermingled like some dwarves and Alfar or they prefer places where they won't be bothered.

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