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A handful of missing goddesses (Fan-Made, 2e)

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  • A handful of missing goddesses (Fan-Made, 2e)

    So I've been grumbling up a storm since word dropped that Sekhmet and Hathor were being folded into Bast and Aset/Isis, respectively, but I figure that now we've had a glance of the rules I could use that energy to instead create something useful. And since we've had the Theoi previewed for us and my longtime favorite Hecate didn't make the cut, I figured the three of them make a fun little subject for a thread and can help me fiddle with what we have so far.

    Hecate
    Pantheon: Theoi
    Aliases: Trivia (Roman)

    Hecate is odd among the Theoi, born to Titans and distant to the rest of her Pantheon. She's a witch-goddess, often depicted in triplicate with the heads of beasts and standing guardian at the crossroads; her three faces represent the phases of the moon, and magical acts prosper under her watchful eye at night. Offerings to Hecate have kept the dead where out of dwellings for thousands of years, and necromancers invoke her when they breach the veil. Almost as well known as Hecate herself is her daughter Circe, famed sorceress who turned Odysseus' men to pigs and his consort for a year. While she's a fringe figure to the Theoi and thus a rare figure in myth, the English playwright Shakespeare gave her a role on the stage in his Scottish Play as a queen among witches who prophesies doom; rumors suggest that she takes mortal form to play the role in especially notable or troubled productions.

    Lonely shrines to Hecate guard the ancient crossroads of the World, discretely sacrificed to by those who wish for safe travel. Many practitioners of magic - the con artists, amateurs, and genuine article alike - call upon her in their rituals for protection and power. While her mortal cult is small, a great number of werewolves and shapeshifters offer her worship, pointing to her changing faces and association with the moon as proof of her favor.

    Callings: Sage, Trickster, Liminal
    Purviews: Moon, Fortune, Darkness, Death, Journeys

    Sekhmet
    Pantheon: Netjer
    Aliases: Sachmis (Greek)

    Sekhmet, is a bloody goddess, the Eye of Ra sent in the form of a lioness to punish the wicked and unjust and prone to wild excesses of drink and frenzy herself. Myth has her sent from the heavens to lay waste to those who did not revere Ra properly and was so consumed by bloodlust that she threatened to slaughter the entire human race; only an offering of copious quantities of beer dyed the color of blood by quick-thinking Ra (or Djehuti, depending on who tells the story) allowed her rampage to end as she passed out from intoxication. Sekhmet presides over war and punishes the wicked, but also acts as the protector of royalty and as patron to healers, and this duality of wanton destruction and faithful service to the proper order defines her.

    The World has tried to move on from the kind of brutal warfare that Sekhmet revels in, but truly desperate soldiers pray to her for the strength to swiftly destroy their enemies and end conflicts as soon as possible, and Sekhmet revels in granting them such rage that friend and foe are injured. Far more pleasant are the many feasts and festivals in her name, an unbroken line of public drunkenness and property damage that offers a less-violent outlet for her fury; smart authorities fence off areas where the celebrations will occur and wait to clean up the mess in the morning.

    Callings: Warrior, Judge, Healer
    Purviews: Beasts (Lion), Fire, Health, War, Passion (Rage)

    Hathor
    Pantheon: Netjer

    Old even for the venerable Netjer, Hathor has been the sacred cow for as long as there has been an Egypt and likely well before. While others among her Pantheon are grim servants to order and their duties, Hathor has always been joyful and full of love; she is there in every woman's laugh and every mother's smile. While it would be easy to view her solely as a kindly soul, she possesses the anger of a protective parent and has at times been a wrathful Eye of Ra herself. Hers is the bounty of the earth (turquoise was believed to be a gift from her) and the freedom of the open sky. Differing accounts place her as mother, wife, and daughter of Ra, and she carries his sacred sun between her horns.

    Women look to Hathor for help in matters of romance and for guidance as mothers, offering jewelry in hopes of receiving her aid. She looks with fondness upon any who label themselves female (something at odds with the fairly traditional majority of her Pantheon), and her worship touches any who have ever listened to their hearts.

    Callings: Lover, Guardian, Healer
    Purviews: Beasts (Cow), Fertility, Sun, Sky, Prosperity
    Last edited by atamajakki; 09-28-2016, 02:59 AM.


    Just call me Lex.

    Female pronouns for me, please.

  • #2
    Hathor and Sekhmet are two I WOULD combine with each other, since there's an actual myth to that effect.
    Last edited by glamourweaver; 09-28-2016, 03:06 AM.


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    • #3
      Too bad I can't like this more than once. Thank you for doing this, esp. for Hecate (one of my favorites). For that matter, Sekhmet's a favorite too.

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      • #4
        I can understand dividing Hathor and Sekhmet, but you should probably mention their connection.
        Otherwise it looks very cool!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
          Too bad I can't like this more than once. Thank you for doing this, esp. for Hecate (one of my favorites). For that matter, Sekhmet's a favorite too.
          These three are probably my favorite deities out of any Pantheon, so imagine my pain when none of them made it into the book! It's the least I could do.

          Enjoy a picture of Sekhmet, my cat:



          Just call me Lex.

          Female pronouns for me, please.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Incendax View Post
            I can understand dividing Hathor and Sekhmet, but you should probably mention their connection.
            Otherwise it looks very cool!
            I sort of did, in that they're both Eyes of Ra, but that might be worth working in there sometime other than midnight before an opening shift and a road trip.


            Just call me Lex.

            Female pronouns for me, please.

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            • #7
              Adorable cat!

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              • #8
                Nice - you can never have too many Goddesses. And I am equally bummed about the combining of some of the Goddesses in 2nd Edition. But that's the great thing about a fan community!

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                • #9
                  Great work! And this is a good example of what the devs were talking about: adding new gods to a pantheon really doesn't seem particularly hard. ​So for those of us who don't like the Aset/Hathor merger, for example can just use these two goddesses as separate entities if we wish.

                  ​Thanks for showing us how easy this can really be, and thanks for sure for adding Hecate. I'm a big fan of hers as well, and it was disappointing to see her not included in the Theoi writeup. Honestly, I would've left out Hestia to make room for her. Hestia, by definition, is extremely inactive in the World. Why use her instead of a goddess who is actually active and mixes with humanity fairly regularly?


                  "We have done the impossible, and that makes us mighty."
                  Captain Malcolm Reynolds

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by unnatural1 View Post
                    Great work! And this is a good example of what the devs were talking about: adding new gods to a pantheon really doesn't seem particularly hard. ​So for those of us who don't like the Aset/Hathor merger, for example can just use these two goddesses as separate entities if we wish.

                    ​Thanks for showing us how easy this can really be, and thanks for sure for adding Hecate. I'm a big fan of hers as well, and it was disappointing to see her not included in the Theoi writeup. Honestly, I would've left out Hestia to make room for her. Hestia, by definition, is extremely inactive in the World. Why use her instead of a goddess who is actually active and mixes with humanity fairly regularly?
                    Because Hestia is one of the twelve Olympians.


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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by unnatural1 View Post
                      ​Thanks for showing us how easy this can really be, and thanks for sure for adding Hecate. I'm a big fan of hers as well, and it was disappointing to see her not included in the Theoi writeup. Honestly, I would've left out Hestia to make room for her. Hestia, by definition, is extremely inactive in the World. Why use her instead of a goddess who is actually active and mixes with humanity fairly regularly?
                      On top of what White Oak Dragon said, Hecate is also a Titan. A turncoat Titan along with Helios, Eos, Selene, and possibly Prometheus and Epimetheus, but still a Titan by the Greek system. Like Helios, she hangs around the Pantheon a lot, but is so powerful that Zeus gives her a lot of space IIRC. So, she might not be listed due to the same reason Helios isn't. I think Neall has talked specifically about Helios before in the Ask Neall thread, so you might find some answers there.

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                      • #12
                        Yeah, I wasn't knocking Hestia's importance in Ancient Greek religion. But since her Legend revolves heavily around her staying at home and not doing much, she just doesn't seem quite as useful from a storytelling perspective. She rarely has Scions, and she doesn't tend to get involved in Pantheon politics. Just seems like saving her for a supplement and using another god who is fairly well-known and who is active in the World would be a better idea.

                        ​But yeah, Watcher, you might be right. It's possible Hecate's titanic origins may mean the devs had some other plan for where to put her in the books.


                        "We have done the impossible, and that makes us mighty."
                        Captain Malcolm Reynolds

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by unnatural1 View Post
                          Yeah, I wasn't knocking Hestia's importance in Ancient Greek religion. But since her Legend revolves heavily around her staying at home and not doing much, she just doesn't seem quite as useful from a storytelling perspective. She rarely has Scions, and she doesn't tend to get involved in Pantheon politics. Just seems like saving her for a supplement and using another god who is fairly well-known and who is active in the World would be a better idea.

                          ​But yeah, Watcher, you might be right. It's possible Hecate's titanic origins may mean the devs had some other plan for where to put her in the books.
                          Zeus is born to Titans, does that disqualify him?


                          Just call me Lex.

                          Female pronouns for me, please.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by atamajakki View Post

                            Zeus is born to Titans, does that disqualify him?
                            ​No. Why would it?

                            ​He's classified as a god. So is Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter, and Hestia, who were also born of Titans. The difference is that, at least in some traditions, Hecate actually IS a Titan. Not simply a goddess born of Titans.


                            "We have done the impossible, and that makes us mighty."
                            Captain Malcolm Reynolds

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, Titan and God are a lot like species in Greek Mythology. Hecate is a Titan. The Gods and Goddesses are all the children of Cronus and Rhea. Zeus guarentees Hecate's holdings in the Underworld, the Sea, and the Heavens in return for her support in the Titan War. She's described as being someone even Zeus is respectful to, most likely because she is a generation older than Zeus, which going by the Grecian Age of Saturn theory, means she is more powerful.

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