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Q&A with Neall (transcript)

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  • #16
    Originally posted by SpectacularTentacular View Post


    I figured it out pretty quickly...
    It's not like /every/ Scion 2e comment about the Netjer is me!

    ...just most of them.


    Just call me Lex.

    Female pronouns for me, please.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by atamajakki View Post

      It's not like /every/ Scion 2e comment about the Netjer is me!

      ...just most of them.
      see, i wasnt sure at first,and then i thought about it. it all made sense. but hey, at least you were there asking questions!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by nalak42 View Post
        Geasa were mentioned and I'm not familiar with that word. I tried looking it up and what came up was just the geas, so is Geasa a pantheon or some alternate reference to a geas?
        It's a little complicated.

        Geas is a taboo, a prohibition in the legal sense or a very formal or authoritative command. Geasa is the plural, i.e. taboos.

        However Geasa, the plural, has an additional meaning of a spell that prohibits something, which Geas itself does not have.

        So Cú Chulainn suffered from a Geasa, not a Geas

        Pronunciation close to "Gas" in English with the G closer to a "Gy".

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        • #19
          I had not known about Geasa being the only word that applies to a Prohibition spell. Thanks, An.


          Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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          • #20
            I always heard the singular pronounced basically like "gesh, while the plural is more like "ges-eh."

            The irish gaelic spelling of it is "geis" while the scottish gaelic is "geas." I think the plural is spelled the same for both.

            (Just like how the faerie mounds are "sidhe" in irish gaelic while "sith" in scottish gaelic.)

            I'm no expert though.


            Book of the Emerald Circle
            Custom Sidereal Charms
            Expanded Sidereal Linguistics

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Limited Reagent View Post
              I always heard the singular pronounced basically like "gesh, while the plural is more like "ges-eh."

              The irish gaelic spelling of it is "geis" while the scottish gaelic is "geas." I think the plural is spelled the same for both.
              There's a few things.

              Firstly it's Geas in both Irish and Scottish Gaelic. There's no "e" vowel in the word, rather the "Ge" refers to the type of G used, it might sound like "Gy" to an English speaker.

              However the word does have a case form "Geis", which sounds like English "Gesh". I think this may be where English speakers got that pronunciation. It's the form of the word used after prepositions. However it's still a singular form so doesn't mean " a magic prohibiting spell".

              The plural after prepositions is "Geasaibh" like English "Gas-iv".

              (Just like how the faerie mounds are "sidhe" in irish gaelic while "sith" in scottish gaelic.)
              It was "Sidhe" in Classical Gaelic, the common literary language of Ireland and Scotland, but is simply "Sí" in Irish.

              You didn't say this, but it can only be used for a Fairy Hill or Mound if the Mound arises from a Cairn or burial tumulus, not for a generic hill the Sí may inhabit.

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              • #22
                See stuff like that is why I REALLY appreciated the pronunciation guide with the Tuatha preview, and honestly hope that it's included with the other pantheons.

                I can find out I've been pronouncing literally EVERYTHING wrong!


                Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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                • #23
                  I've heard nearly as many complaints about Gaelic spelling as I have about Welsh spelling.

                  I'm pretty much biased toward Gaelic on account of ancestry, though.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Kyman201 View Post
                    See stuff like that is why I REALLY appreciated the pronunciation guide with the Tuatha preview, and honestly hope that it's included with the other pantheons.
                    The Scion2E guide is very good, it seems to switch between the Old Irish pronunciation and a more modern one (however not the modern day one) depending on which would be easier for an Anglophone, which is the right way to go.
                    The fully modern pronunciation wouldn't be recognised by fans (Dagda is today pronounced like English "die") and sometimes the older one is too difficult to pronounce.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
                      I've heard nearly as many complaints about Gaelic spelling as I have about Welsh spelling.

                      I'm pretty much biased toward Gaelic on account of ancestry, though.
                      It makes perfect sense when you speak it. If I encounter a new word in English or Gaelic, I'm more likely to know the Gaelic words pronunciation from the spelling. However the orthography works off a set of assumptions that have more in common with Slavic languages than English.

                      Welsh, I think, has one of, if not the most perfect spelling systems of all Indo-European languages, in the sense that symbols match to sounds and vice versa most closely.
                      Last edited by An Fhuiseog; 10-21-2016, 12:32 PM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by An Fhuiseog View Post
                        It makes perfect sense when you speak it. If I encounter a new word in English or Gaelic, I'm more likely to know the Gaelic words pronunciation from the spelling. However the orthography works of a set of assumptions that have more in common with Slavic languages than English.

                        Welsh, I think, has one of, if not the most perfect spelling systems of all Indo-European languages, in the sense that symbols match to sounds and vice versa most closely.
                        Yeah, unfortunately I don't speak it. I don't complain about it, either. I rather want to speak it, but I haven't looked into doing so.

                        And I won't argue about Welsh. Most of the complaints I've heard have been from English speakers who do not speak it. I guess it's seen as fun to joke about.

                        And google turned up a site called learngaelic, which teaches Scottish Gaelic. And other resources as well. Also, bitesize.irish to learn Irish Gaelic.
                        Last edited by Resplendent Fire; 10-21-2016, 12:30 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by An Fhuiseog View Post
                          Welsh, I think, has one of, if not the most perfect spelling systems of all Indo-European languages, in the sense that symbols match to sounds and vice versa most closely.
                          That's what I found when I started studying it. Once you knew the spelling conventions, pronunciation was easy.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
                            Also, bitresize.irish to learn Irish Gaelic.
                            I want to thank you very very much for this thingy :3


                            Userhat Aegpts Vlrs. Coren "Ojos de Fuego". Mithrael. Menehet.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
                              Yeah, unfortunately I don't speak it. I don't complain about it, either. I rather want to speak it, but I haven't looked into doing so.

                              And I won't argue about Welsh. Most of the complaints I've heard have been from English speakers who do not speak it. I guess it's seen as fun to joke about.
                              Oh, I didn't think you were saying anything negative, just commenting on why it can be confusing.

                              Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
                              And google turned up a site called learngaelic, which teaches Scottish Gaelic. And other resources as well. Also, bitesize.irish to learn Irish Gaelic.
                              Eoin, who runs the site, is a nice lad, I've heard good things about it.

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