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  • #16
    Originally posted by Omegaphallic View Post
    Did anyone else get the feeling that the $290,000 stretch goal was the direct result of this thread?
    I doubt it. One of the big draws of Scion is the gods, so adding more is always going to be a sexy option for a stretch goal. It's not like the Netjer are the only ones with extensive Mantles, either; I'd bet the difference between Ares and Mars is one they'll explore.


    Call me Regina or Lex.

    Female pronouns for me, please.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by atamajakki View Post

      I doubt it. One of the big draws of Scion is the gods, so adding more is always going to be a sexy option for a stretch goal. It's not like the Netjer are the only ones with extensive Mantles, either; I'd bet the difference between Ares and Mars is one they'll explore.
      Be right back, making a Scion whose mother is Odin while studying under Freya.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Solana View Post

        Be right back, making a Scion whose mother is Odin while studying under Freya.
        I'm not familiar with that myth.

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        • #19
          I believe that's a reference to Freya teaching Odin seidr.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Omegaphallic View Post
            I'm not familiar with that myth.
            Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post
            I believe that's a reference to Freya teaching Odin seidr.
            Yes, there's a myth where Odin goes to Freya in order to learn Seidr, which is considered a womanly art. Various interpretation of the myth include Odin becoming a woman for the sake of learning it, crossdressing, or just plain being 'unmanly' in his pursuit of it. At the very least, Loki spits a few barbs over it in one of the sagas after the fact.

            In any event, if we're going with mantles and the like, it's not inconceivable for an aspect of Odin as a Volva/Seidr practitioner to be someone's mother.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Solana View Post



              Yes, there's a myth where Odin goes to Freya in order to learn Seidr, which is considered a womanly art. Various interpretation of the myth include Odin becoming a woman for the sake of learning it, crossdressing, or just plain being 'unmanly' in his pursuit of it. At the very least, Loki spits a few barbs over it in one of the sagas after the fact.

              In any event, if we're going with mantles and the like, it's not inconceivable for an aspect of Odin as a Volva/Seidr practitioner to be someone's mother.
              Thank You.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Solana View Post



                Yes, there's a myth where Odin goes to Freya in order to learn Seidr, which is considered a womanly art. Various interpretation of the myth include Odin becoming a woman for the sake of learning it, crossdressing, or just plain being 'unmanly' in his pursuit of it. At the very least, Loki spits a few barbs over it in one of the sagas after the fact.

                In any event, if we're going with mantles and the like, it's not inconceivable for an aspect of Odin as a Volva/Seidr practitioner to be someone's mother.
                And Loki, mother of Sleipnir, doesn't really have a lot of room to talk.

                I've heard that there's a possibility that the whole barb-spitting thing was added later, although I don't have enough information to fully support that.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post

                  And Loki, mother of Sleipnir, doesn't really have a lot of room to talk.

                  I've heard that there's a possibility that the whole barb-spitting thing was added later, although I don't have enough information to fully support that.

                  Loki has personally given birth no less than three times. Coupled with his insult, methinks the mare doth protest too much.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Solana View Post


                    Loki has personally given birth no less than three times. Coupled with his insult, methinks the mare doth protest too much.
                    At the risk of continuing to sidetrack this thread about the Netjer, who were the other two?

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post

                      At the risk of continuing to sidetrack this thread about the Netjer, who were the other two?
                      Didn't Loki also give birth to the Jormungandr and Fenrir too? There's also Hel, but I don't know if Loki gave birth to Hel or if he was her father.


                      Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Resplendent Fire View Post

                        At the risk of continuing to sidetrack this thread about the Netjer, who were the other two?
                        Apart from foaling Sleipnir off of Svadilfari there are also some lines of the Lokasenna where Odin refers to another incident in which Loki played a female role. Loki is described as having spent eight winters in some underground area, either milking cows, or depending on the translator, being milked/lactating. The closing lines of the same stanza accuse Loki of giving birth.

                        There's also this from the Lesser Voluspa:

                        The wolf did Loki sire on Angrboda,
                        And Sleipnir he bore to Svadilfari;
                        The worst piece of witchcraft seemed the one
                        Sprung from the brother of Byleist then.
                        A heart ate Loki—in the embers it lay,
                        And half-cooked found he the woman’s heart-
                        With child from the woman Lopt soon was,
                        And thence among men came every troll-woman.

                        The phrase troll-woman is, as I understand it, a translation of the word flagð, which can also be translated as ogress, giantess, witch, she-wolf, etc.Basically anything nasty for a woman to be. Then there is:

                        The war I remember, the first in the world,
                        When the gods with spears had smitten Gullveig,
                        And in the hall of Hár had burned her,
                        Three times burned, and three times born,
                        Oft and again, yet ever she lives.
                        Heid they named her
                        When she came to the house,
                        The wide-seeing witch,
                        In magic wise;
                        She performed seið where she could,
                        Worked seið in a trance,
                        To evil women
                        She was always a joy.

                        So we're told that the witch lives and goes around teaching scary magic proper women shouldn't know, whereas in the other it's suggested that Loki ate up her heart and gave birth from it. You could even argue that the witch in question 'is' Loki under a mantle as the Mother of Witches.

                        I couldn't find the third instance, I might have been confusing it with the witch being three times born, but in any case giving birth twice is twice more than most men manage!

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Kyman201 View Post

                          Didn't Loki also give birth to the Jormungandr and Fenrir too? There's also Hel, but I don't know if Loki gave birth to Hel or if he was her father.
                          Fenris, Jormungandr and Hela were sired off of Angrboda, the hag of the Ironwood.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Kyman201 View Post

                            Didn't Loki also give birth to the Jormungandr and Fenrir too? There's also Hel, but I don't know if Loki gave birth to Hel or if he was her father.
                            Angrboða is the mother of Jormungandr, Fenrir, and Hel. Loki is their father. At least that's my understanding of the mythology, which wiki agrees with.

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                            • #29
                              Well I stand DOUBLE-corrected. :P


                              Disclaimer: I'll huff, grump, and defend my position, but if you're having fun I'll never say you're doing it wrong.

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