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What Mantles would you like to see?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post

    Oh, I think the Hathor/Sekhmet conflation is the most interesting route to go with them as a twin aspected goddess of creation and destruction is inherently cool, and serves to make her more distinct from more guardian, less destructive, non-Creation-Goddess Bastet.
    I imagine that most mantles are subtle changes, that at best alter one or two purviews and maybe a calling.

    The main thing I liked about the idea of using the myth that combines Hathor and Sekhmet into a singular entity is that not only is it well known, but it would give us a deity that takes mantles to their logical extreme, where the two mantles are so dramatically different that they probably completely change the purviews and callings associated with the two sides. Yeah, it'd probably be easier to just make them separate deities, but this way you could also model an example of a mantle that creates an extreme shift in a deity.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Zeldafan42 View Post
      Ok, I'm going to clarify my early post with the knowledge that Egyptian mythology is not my strong point. I only suggested the Hathor/Sekhmet merger because I've heard that myth from several sources, and assumed the myth that connects them must be a common myth because of that. If the two of them aren't actually that commonly conflated together, then I suppose we're probably better off just leaving them separate.
      The myth is brought up often because the book itself was a pretty big find, but seeing it in several places on the internet does not mean that the myth as it's recorded in the book is recorded that way in many places back when it was relevant.

      Originally posted by Zeldafan42 View Post

      I imagine that most mantles are subtle changes, that at best alter one or two purviews and maybe a calling.

      The main thing I liked about the idea of using the myth that combines Hathor and Sekhmet into a singular entity is that not only is it well known, but it would give us a deity that takes mantles to their logical extreme, where the two mantles are so dramatically different that they probably completely change the purviews and callings associated with the two sides. Yeah, it'd probably be easier to just make them separate deities, but this way you could also model an example of a mantle that creates an extreme shift in a deity.
      I don't think stretching the Mantle system until it should break does the definition any favors. If you take two goddesses who are distinct from one another, and then use a myth as an excuse to push them together, what you will get is one goddess with a mantle that is contrary to her in every way. Sekhmet has different purviews from Hathor, different Callings from Hathor, she has her own festivals, priestesses, sacred days, etc. She has her own Scions in the mythology, which have nothing to do with Hathor. In this context the notion of a mantle would have literally no meaning at all because for all intents and purposes, Hathor and her mantle of Sekhmet are completely different gods. You could say that Sekhmet is a mantle of her, or that Sekhmet is a goddess in her own right, but the practical result would be exactly the same either way.

      So why do it? The only way I can think of to distinguish it is to truly conflate the gods into one being, which would be the mythological equivalent of Dr. Hathor and Ms. Sekhmet. At least the Morrigan in all of her aspects draws from a common theme, Brigid likewise.

      Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post

      Oh, I think the Hathor/Sekhmet conflation is the most interesting route to go with them as a twin aspected goddess of creation and destruction is inherently cool, and serves to make her more distinct from more guardian, less destructive, non-Creation-Goddess Bastet.
      I think the irony is that you just said they are pretty distinct from each other already. Bastet is a guardian deity who isn't destructive, isn't tied to the royal family, etc.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Solana View Post

        I think the irony is that you just said they are pretty distinct from each other already. Bastet is a guardian deity who isn't destructive, isn't tied to the royal family, etc.
        That's the case very late - but early on you've got effectively identical goddesses of war in lower (Bastet) and upper (Sekhmet) Egypt. It is completely valid with that in mind to treat Bastet's guardian behavior relative to Sekhmet's destructiveness the same way the game treats the differences between murderous Ares and disciplined Mars.

        Sekhmet-Hathor as goddess of creation & destruction is the strongest alternative to that IMO.


        Check out my expansion to the Realm of Brass and Shadow

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        • #49
          Originally posted by glamourweaver View Post

          That's the case very late - but early on you've got effectively identical goddesses of war in lower (Bastet) and upper (Sekhmet) Egypt. It is completely valid with that in mind to treat Bastet's guardian behavior relative to Sekhmet's destructiveness the same way the game treats the differences between murderous Ares and disciplined Mars.

          Sekhmet-Hathor as goddess of creation & destruction is the strongest alternative to that IMO.
          Bastet's status as a goddess of war was downplayed considerably with the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt. She became more of a apotropaic goddess to Sekhmet's flat-out war goddess.


          We don't allow mages to cast spells, since this is the most unbalancing rule of all.

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