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How Would You Change or Update Demon Hunter X?

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  • Aya Tari
    started a topic How Would You Change or Update Demon Hunter X?

    How Would You Change or Update Demon Hunter X?

    I am just curious how people would change or update Demon Hunter X?

  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Darmani View Post
    As it's the holidays and I have nothing to do but browse and go over subjects that I hope to see more of. I was wondering if you ever Revisited these thoughts? Such as how you would like to reimagine the world of Darkness with your particular perspective and understanding. For instance when it be kind of weird but with the aforementioned Catholic population that the Society of Leopold and inquisitors knew much more about the kindred of the east and so on and differences than other shadow organizations
    admittedly run into other issues. As an example Catholic rules versus sindo or traditions on ghosts and spirits
    Somewhat late of a response, and I'm more savvy with CoD than WoD... so far, all I have in my head is this image of tripartite lines of hunters for the Korean peninsula: Government-lead strike teams that conscript psychics and sorcerers from the mandatory military service, blending military tech/tactics with mystic ones to deal with malevolent spirits of the dead from all the wars, and the strange bestial shapeshifters in the mountains. A network of ancient families of Muist shamans and Taoist exorcists who have dealings with the walking dead, with some of them revered as ancestors but others damned as abominations to be vanquished. Finally, a conspiracy behind all the disparate Christian denominations that started with well-intentioned men who were appalled at all the monsters running amok in the night, waging a secret guerilla war on them to this very day, using all those Christian cults as cat's-paws and necessary evil to lead people at least away from cults ran by true monsters.

    No idea what the broader world would be like, though. I do know that I'd prefer a more 'global' approach to some of the more regional/national monsters; Wan Kuei in Europe, Kindred in Asia, the Garou Nation downplayed in favor of the Beast Courts, mummies less culturally affiliated to Egypt, Fallen less blatantly Abrahamic, and so on.

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  • Beriorn
    replied
    Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
    It's hard to get a proper number for China or North Korea, given the existence of the state run Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association and North Korean Catholic Association. As both groups reject Vatican authority in a number of areas, there's an argument to be made that their members may technically not qualify as Roman Catholics. There are about 5.7 million members of the CPCA, and estimates of "rogue" Catholics range from another 3 to 6 million, depending on source.
    The position of the Church in China is an interesting one: when you take a look at it closely its' a borderline schism but the Vatican does not acknowledge any differences and recognizes both the sacraments performed by the Chinese and the Bishops appointed by the Chinese state, who are recognized after the fact. That's more out of pragmatism than any agreement with how things happen over there and it beats the alternative.

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  • Darmani
    replied
    Originally posted by 21C Hermit View Post

    "Sindo" ("way of the gods"; same meaning as Shinto) is a somewhat academic word. The more commonly used word is "musok," which practically means "shamanism" but literally means "shamanistic custom." And that's what it is; a custom, and a tradition. It's a religion, but more a part of the nationalistic culture rather than something... structured, so to speak.

    It's a paradoxical situation; most people here are irreligious or atheistic, especially in the big cities and especially with regards to shamanism, since it is stereotyped more as superstition than religion. And yet we see people around us carrying good-luck and evil-warding talismans every now and then, little and big shops hosting the shamans in the corners that do earn enough income from guests who come for divination and exorcism, calendars that have "days without guests" (read; days without malevolent ghosts running amok) noted, and rumors of the belief being a lot more stronger in the upper echelons of society than people would readily admit. And let's not forget all the urban legends and ghost stories.

    In the World of Darkness, I expect all of the above to be both true and false in a myriad ways. With regards to Demon Hunter, I'd expect shamanistic hunters to focus on wraiths and specters, with some necromantic sorcery every now and then.
    As it's the holidays and I have nothing to do but browse and go over subjects that I hope to see more of. I was wondering if you ever Revisited these thoughts? Such as how you would like to reimagine the world of Darkness with your particular perspective and understanding. For instance when it be kind of weird but with the aforementioned Catholic population that the Society of Leopold and inquisitors knew much more about the kindred of the east and so on and differences than other shadow organizations
    admittedly run into other issues. As an example Catholic rules versus sindo or traditions on ghosts and spirits

    Leave a comment:


  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Aya Tari View Post
    I think it is more a question if they believe in Sindo and go to the shaman-priests rather than being shaman-priests and attendants. As for declaring it to be their religion, I have no idea how South Korean culture interprets the belief in the indigenous religion, so I could not even hazard a guess. Most South Koreans that I have met converted to Christianity before they came to the US, but most of them came to the US because they felt that the US was more accepting of their Christian religion (among other things).
    "Sindo" ("way of the gods"; same meaning as Shinto) is a somewhat academic word. The more commonly used word is "musok," which practically means "shamanism" but literally means "shamanistic custom." And that's what it is; a custom, and a tradition. It's a religion, but more a part of the nationalistic culture rather than something... structured, so to speak.

    It's a paradoxical situation; most people here are irreligious or atheistic, especially in the big cities and especially with regards to shamanism, since it is stereotyped more as superstition than religion. And yet we see people around us carrying good-luck and evil-warding talismans every now and then, little and big shops hosting the shamans in the corners that do earn enough income from guests who come for divination and exorcism, calendars that have "days without guests" (read; days without malevolent ghosts running amok) noted, and rumors of the belief being a lot more stronger in the upper echelons of society than people would readily admit. And let's not forget all the urban legends and ghost stories.

    In the World of Darkness, I expect all of the above to be both true and false in a myriad ways. With regards to Demon Hunter, I'd expect shamanistic hunters to focus on wraiths and specters, with some necromantic sorcery every now and then.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aya Tari
    replied
    I think it is more a question if they believe in Sindo and go to the shaman-priests rather than being shaman-priests and attendants. As for declaring it to be their religion, I have no idea how South Korean culture interprets the belief in the indigenous religion, so I could not even hazard a guess. Most South Koreans that I have met converted to Christianity before they came to the US, but most of them came to the US because they felt that the US was more accepting of their Christian religion (among other things).

    Leave a comment:


  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Aya Tari View Post
    Personally, I find Sindo to be fascinating, much in the way that I find Shinto to be fascinating. I always feel somewhat sad when outside religions replace indigenous religions, as I think that some of the richness of the world is lost. I am glad that an estimated 30% of South Korea still practices Sindo.
    30%? Interesting number. Does that statistic include only the shamans and their attendants themselves, or their customers and guests as well? Because when you ask someone what their religion is, very few answer with Shamanism.

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  • Darmani
    replied
    Let us not veer to the other extreme. Far from intentional how would you feel if someone said that about your way of life

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  • Aya Tari
    replied
    Personally, I find Sindo to be fascinating, much in the way that I find Shinto to be fascinating. I always feel somewhat sad when outside religions replace indigenous religions, as I think that some of the richness of the world is lost. I am glad that an estimated 30% of South Korea still practices Sindo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Darmani
    replied
    It seems inaccurate to go to Asian country and talk about western semi christrianized monsters hunted by Christians. Sure influential but really wouldn't the indigenous culture do so? Is Christianity something of a class adoption too? Not that the k anime fighters are better but some lines feel more dangerous to cross.

    Especially if cainite vamps are not in numbers and the eastern ones retain theirsuperdemon shapeshiftinv etc powers.

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  • 21C Hermit
    replied
    On South Korean Christians: be they Catholic or Protestant or whatever, their lack of numbers sure does not equal a lack of activity, nor a lack of influence. Especially in the larger cities like Seoul, where we have a church in almost every two or so blocks. (We joke about how we don't have to worry about vampire attacks, because crosses are everywhere) In fact, even some Koreans are surprised when they hear Christianity is not the number-one religion in Korea.

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  • Darmani
    replied
    I am really from the outside looking in aside from a general sense of withering judgement towards any time the world of Darkness tried to use real-world as a reference to something. But I would recommend using a generic term or relative translation and then attach in Universe words to it. That way you will effectively teach the language. I mean not really teach a functional knowing of the language but yeah. Use a generic term and this case and English and then throw in a number of alternate words and meanings. Also include a note on the sidebar about how there are entire stories and poems compose them nothing but homophones in the language so we really really recommend that you don't think that because we're using this word this one way that that's what that word means. And short ripoff exalted which use a lot of similar traits and ideas but didn't feel the need to play it as if they were inducting someone into the belief system. As such it gave you a basic for gaming purposes idea of the concept and then move you on to specific terms and then hopefully specific practices that are done in history in the real world.
    that's the best way to do this in terms of a game that's trying to use the real world and its elements for reference. Indicate how you are trying to create a body of work to interpret things and how to arrange it then point to the actual practice and then say this is what we're doing and this is how you can learn more so that you can make your modifications. After all someone who's actually sleeping this if they don't throw the thing across the room will probably be able to edit the entire thing in order so that it doesn't seem all that wrong.
    So maybe go surreal as opposed to realist

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  • theoutlander523
    replied
    Originally posted by Saur Ops Specialist View Post

    That seems an extremely odd objection. Do they not recall the names of their characters, either?
    Makes it harder to remember what stuff means/is as they don't speak the language. Take Qiao for example, remember what that is is much harder than Bridge. Qiao is just some empty meaning to someone that doesn't speak the language, unlike Bridge.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Originally posted by Aya Tari View Post
    It is still just 1.1% of the Asian population outside of the Philippines, which would be an average population density of 2.5 Catholics per square mile.
    Populations of subcultures don't work that way. They tend to clump together in groups. Laotian Catholics, for example, tend to be ethnically Vietnamese and live in the towns along the Mekong River. About 10% of Ho Chi Mihn City/Saigon's population is Catholic, which is a higher percentage than the country's population as a whole. It's the same way that there are a little over 300,000 members of the Cherokee Nation(s), out of a US population of around 320 million. That's what? 0.0004% of the population? But they aren't distributed mathematically across the country, and more than Somalis, Hmong or Cubans are. About 2/3 of them live in Oklahoma. But you also have towns in California of all places where they make up a noteworthy minority. Because the diversity of human culture is much more complex - and interesting - than "X number of group Y live in Z square miles so they are therefore irrelevant".

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  • Aya Tari
    replied
    It is still just 1.1% of the Asian population outside of the Philippines, which would be an average population density of 2.5 Catholics per square mile (though there are a lot of empty spaces in Asia). Outside of the Philippines, your best bet for enough Catholics to make it worthwhile to have an Inquisition is in South Korea, Vietnam, and India, though the native KJ will probably kick the teeth in of any members of the Inquisition that they find (the Shih are one thing, they have a place in Asia, the Inquisition is something entirely different).

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