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  • Ghostbusters Resurrected

    The Jan. 25, 2019 issue of entertainment Weekly has an article saying that Jason Reitman: director of Up in the Air and Juno, is making a follow up to his father Ivan Reitman's Ghostbuster movies. The sequel is set in the present day and assumes that the action we saw in the 80's films took place in the 80's. There is a teaser on the EW website. You can also fine the teaser on YouTube.

    So how would you tie a Ghostbuster sequel into the World of Darkness, Wraith, Orpheus, or Hunter?
    Last edited by moonwolf8; 01-26-2019, 09:40 PM.

  • #2
    The original trio as presented at the start of the first film are textbook examples of the Center for Parapsychological Research (Wraith's The Quick & The Dead, page 29). Something expanded on in the film novelization (in addition to Winston's background in the USAF) is that the hauntings infecting New York City are largely the result of the Ivo Shandor's building design collecting and amplifying paranormal energy, allowing ghosts and other spirits to manifest. The Wraith equivalent would be such a building lowering the Shroud level for the entire city (or at least Manhattan).

    I've no idea what the planned concept for the forthcoming sequel is, so it's hard to say anything about it.

    (As for the 2016 version, I'd have made it a sequel to the first two, set in Chicago, where two or three working class women who've recently lost their jobs find an old 1990s period advertisement for Ghostbusters franchises - an "I Want You" style poster adapted from the Bill Murray posters for Stripes, and decide to give it a shot. The number they call is answered by Tara Strong - voice only, as Kylie Griffin - before being passed off to Annie Potts, whose seen dressed in black as she's returning from Egon's funeral, who's somewhat incredulous at the idea of anyone answering a 20 year old ad. They are sent the franchise starter kit, including proton packs which are basically antiques at this point. This means they have to get a friend of a friend genius engineer - say, Kate McKinnon - to repair and update the gear. The ultimate threat would be related to the University of Chicago's Met Lab and its role in the Manhattan Project. And at the end, as a mid-credits stinger, two MiBs - or WiBs - show up for some reason, so that Sony can have that Cinematic Universe everyone was after 3 years ago. Not that I'm sure what else you would put in it. Charlie's Angels? The Karate Kid? Jumanji/Zathura?)


    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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    • #3
      The Ghostbusters comic book from IDW does have a Chicago franchise. Yes, I was disappointed that they did the 2016 Ghostbusters as a reboot instead of a sequel.

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      • #4
        I confess I've never read any of the Ghostbusters comics. (The only IDW stuff I've read is the MLP stuff and Larry Hama's continuation of the original GIJoe series.) But I did play the Ghostbusters International RPG back in the age of dinosaurs, which was based entirely around the idea of local franchises. (I'm vaguely aware of an IDW comic using the title.). It did expand the mythos to include the idea of vampires, aliens and other weirdness. I suppose if Sony had a successful cinematic universe, you could use my above idea, a fourth MIB film involving new characters, the Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle movie, a Bewitched movie that doesn't suck (because magic is real in this universe), an I Dream of Jeanie movie, and a Fantasy Island movie, entirely tied together with cameos and/or a minor recurring character.

        Then, unrelated, is the giant Bad Boys/Charlie's Angels/21 Jump Street crossover film, titled "GUNS! BEWBS! EXPLOSIONS!!!"


        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post

          (As for the 2016 version, I'd have (snip of all the good stuff)
          It's a shame you don't work with the writers because you've nailed it. Can't think why they didn't go for Ghostbusters the next generation instead of the stupid reboot - I suppose that 'reboots' are what gets film companies all excited these days though....

          Quite liked the film but it just felt displaced as a reboot instead of a sequel.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Dogstar View Post
            Quite liked the film but it just felt displaced as a reboot instead of a sequel.
            From what I understand, Sony was totally all in on wanting to ride the Shared Cinematic Universe Money Train the way Disney was with Marvel (and looked like they might be going to with Star Wars at that time), so in addition to elaborate plans for a Spider Man Cinematic Universe, they were also planning to use Ghostbusters as the start of another one (allegedly also involving a new MiB film as well). And someone apparently decided that this necessitated Ghostbusters being a remake/reboot instead of a sequel, for whatever dumb reasons Hollywood executives have for continuously doing dumb things.

            Personally, I want a 1984 Shared Cinematic Universe, involving Ghostbusters, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai, The Terminator, The Last Starfighter, Dreamscape, CHUD, Firestarter, Gremlins, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Starman, Repo Man, Splash, Beverly Hills Cop and The Philadelphia Experiment.


            What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
            Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
              Personally, I want a 1984 Shared Cinematic Universe, involving Ghostbusters, The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai, The Terminator, The Last Starfighter, Dreamscape, CHUD, Firestarter, Gremlins, A Nightmare on Elm Street, Starman, Repo Man, Splash, Beverly Hills Cop and The Philadelphia Experiment.
              You had me at 1984!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Dogstar View Post

                Quite liked the film but it just felt displaced as a reboot instead of a sequel.
                I love Ghostbusters but am not too fond of the 2016 movie, and honestly I think many fans have it wrong when they say a genuine sequel is preferable to a reboot. A reboot could have worked and better than a sequel, but it would have had to be done right. Not nearly enough ink is spilled, and attention and awareness drawn to, Ghostbusters as brilliant, highly subversive, economic satire about the ridiculousness and excess of '80s.

                For one thing, the movie's real antagonist is...Venkman. He's a parasitic, lecherous, borderline sociopathic con man who trips and falls into a good idea and does right in the end. He's the "good guy" because, well...the movie expects the audience to just accept it without really thinking too much about it.

                Meanwhile, Peck isn't actually the ur-antagonist everyone thought he was -- he was simply framed as a bumbling, power-hungry, intrusive bureaucrat. Peck wanted to investigate the Ghostbusters for perfectly rational, sane, justified reasons. The words "unlicensed nuclear accelerator" should have been quite the cue the Ghostbusters were actually doing insane, dangerous shit with potentially massive ramifications that sorely needed some form of regulatory oversight. Peck saw right through Venkman's bullshit, and sure, things became personal for Peck after Venkman kicked things off by constantly antagonizing him, but in the end he actually did have the law and common fucking sense itself on his side. And, again, Peck is "proven wrong" by raw fucking happenstance that had nothing to do with him or Venkman.

                Peck's only the "bad guy" because the movie tells us he is, and expects the audience to just accept it without thinking too much about it. And also, the EPA at the time had been the target of a protracted Republican-led defamation campaign with environmental deregulation as its core motive, thoroughly captured by the fossil fuels industry, and suffered numerous scandals and court cases thanks to the dubious management of the Reagan administration which culminated in the resignation of Anne Gorsuch, all of which contributed to an air of deep skepticism and distrust of the agency and its goals in the early '80s. Right in the middle of the Ozone layer and acid rain crises.

                That said, back to Venkman. He manipulates Ray into taking a third mortgage on his family home with contemptibly usurious interest rates to kickstart the company, which tells the audience he actually has fuck-all business sense (or care as long as he's playing with OPM), a fact later reinforced during the Sedgewick Hotel sequence when he has to take visual cues from Egon about how to properly evaluate the cost of the Ghostbusters' services. He doesn't even know the financials of his own company. Oh boy howdy, I don't even know where or how to begin unpacking that pile of fuck.

                So, at the end of the Carter administration and throughout the Reagan administration the first wave of major financial deregulation hit. This led to the private equity boom of the '80s, and the real estate and corporate debt bubble which popped in the S&L crisis of '86-'95 or so. At the same time, on Wall Street the debt bubble metastasized into a speculation boom empowered by the birth of computerized trading and reinforced by junk bonds and portfolio insurance, which in turn popped on Black Monday, still to this day the biggest single-day stock market loss in history.

                If you're not old enough to remember the financial crisis of the mid-80s, think of it this way. Pretty much everything you've been told about the 2008 financial crisis by everyone who isn't Robert Reich or Paul Krugman, and how it was this surprising, unprecedented economic crash no one could have seen coming, is one of the biggest crocks of shit in human history. 2008 was pretty much a blow-by-blow repeat of the '80s, up to and including bailouts and the end of the crisis thanks to a tech sector bubble, except the 2008 crash was bigger and longer-lived.

                And also during the '80s, we were undergoing a fairly radical shift in perception of the financial sector. Amid all the cocaine and shoulder pads, out of nowhere jet setters, executives, venture capitalists, brokers and hedge fund managers, and bankers became rock stars. Wall Street became the place to be if you were anybody worth knowing, it was Hollywood for math nerds. Hell, American Psycho was based on popular perception of the financial sector, while allegorizing venture capitalism as serial murder.

                And, of course, it was all a big lie -- the people being deified by popular culture were parasitic sociopaths corrupting and exploiting the hard work of technologists and scientists to gamble recklessly with others' livelihoods, who in reality were desperately over their heads and had no idea of the (market) forces with which they were toying. Just like Venkman.

                So, we have a metaphorical venture capitalist leeching off naive but well-intended scientists who's portrayed as a good guy because society says so but who really isn't, set against a federal regulatory officer who's protrayed as a bad guy because society says so but who really isn't. All so they can fight ghosts during the heyday of voodoo economics, and in the end the Ghostbusters save the day because...they got lucky.
                Last edited by Theodrim; 02-24-2019, 01:00 PM.

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                • #9
                  ^^^^^

                  You and I must've watched different versions of the original Ghostbusters.


                  The Final Frontier

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Fat Larry View Post
                    ^^^^^

                    You and I must've watched different versions of the original Ghostbusters.
                    Well, in that case, what part of my analysis in particular did you find inaccurate?

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