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What are we missing to complete the Dark Ages Setting?

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  • #16
    If you're running a game centered around the Ashirra, the Ahl I Batin/Web of Faith, or their Werewolf/Fera counterparts, then the idea of journeying to the Swahili coast, the Ghana Empire, or India's western coast is not unfeasible. Likewise, a period sourcebook for the Laibon or the Three Brothers is just as justifiable as having WoD: Blood & Silk for KotE.


    What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
    Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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    • #17
      In the Companion of Dark Ages V20 there are descriptions of non europeans dominions: Mogadiscio and Mangaluru.

      Recently I wrote a setting for Dark Ages: Kingdom of Georgia, a medieval country in the Caucasus with links with te Byzantine Empire.

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      • #18
        I keep thinking that Rage Across the Black Sea would be a fun period sourcebook. A lot of interesting stuff to play with in that region.


        What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
        Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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        • #19
          I wrote Dark Medieval Armory for Storyteller's Vault because I really felt that Dark Ages needed a book that goes into the weapons and armor of the time - especially considering how... unfortunate... the weapons and armor section in V20 was.

          Other than that, I think Cologne could use some love, it is one of, if not THE, biggest city north of the Alps. Flanders, once of the richest areas of Europe and, depending on how you look at it, an industialized region. The fall of the Second Kingdom of Jerusalem. A sourcebook on the communes of the medieval world, considering how much power they wield in the cities. An updated version of Dark Ages: Werewolf, Mage, Hunter, and Fae to put them in line with V20.

          So, people, get to work on Storyteller Vault supplements!


          Freelance Writer and Storyteller's Vault contributor. Find my work here: http://www.storytellersvault.com/ind...liate_id=17903

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          • #20
            Mage the Dark Ages had strikingly few books for the line. What it needs, in particular is hard for me to quantify. It's been a long time since I looked at the book.

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            • #21
              A book entirely about the Order of Hermes, its Houses, various strongholds and important persons, and how to run the entire thing with the Tremere's fall would have been pretty cool. Though it may have tread too much on Ars Magica territory.

              Something about the Mediterranean area and its proto-Ecstatic and Thanatoic fellowships would be nice.

              Maybe something about medieval science and philosophy that goes into more detail about Craftmasons, Byzantine Artificers, and the like?


              What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
              Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

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              • #22
                Also in the realm of Dark Ages: Mage, perhaps a book about religion in Dark Medieval Europe, primarily concerning 12th and 13th century Christianity and the Roman Catholic Church, its doctrines and various heresies (gnostic and otherwise), especially those concerning natural philosophy, metaphysics and theurgy which would apply to Mages, and the systems of monasteries, religious orders and the universities and how Mages fit into them; how and why the various Eastern Orthodox faiths differ from the Church of Rome; some discussion of Medieval Jews; and several of the Fellowships as seen through a religious lens. This would mainly be the Messianic Voices (with the caveat that for the most part they are essentially a Gnostic sect with Christian window dressing), the Cabal of Pure Thought and how they differ from the Voices proper, just what the Knights Templar are doing, how the Order of Hermes deals with the Church (mainly in the universities probably, but also including those in House Jerbiton who see it as a patron of art and culture, and those in House Flambeau that take up the role of crusader), the Craftmasons and what they were doing during the Albigensian Crusade, the Spirit Talkers from the perspective of Christian hermits, folk magicians and theurgists who deal with angels and demons, Ahl.i Batin that are part of Europe's Christian or Jewish communities, and perhaps a bit discussing the potential of some of the Celtic Christian traditions of early Medieval Britain and Ireland as a possible mask (or even syncretism) for the Old Faith. And this could also potentially introduce the Lions of Zion as a Fellowship.

                In contrast, if Witches & Pagans hadn't already been used as a title in Mage: The Sorcerers' Crusade, I'd suggest it as a counterpart title looking at various pagan folklore traditions throughout Europe - not just the obvious Celtic, Germanic and Greco-Roman ones, but also Iberian, Slavic, Magyar, and others, as well as the various Eastern mystery cults (like those to Isis or Cybele), and how they'd play into Mage, and how they manifest in various Fellowships. This would mainly be the Old Faith, the Valdaermen, and the Spirit Talkers, but also a bit about the Order of Hermes, including some of the practices of the Houses of Bjornaer, Criamon, and Merinita, and perhaps also giving some details about House Diedne for the first time. This could also possibly be a place to present the Cult of Bacchus and the Pomegranate Kore as Fellowships.


                What is tolerance? It is the consequence of humanity. We are all formed of frailty and error; let us pardon reciprocally each other's folly. That is the first law of nature.
                Voltaire, "Tolerance" (1764)

                Comment

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