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Horrors of Darkness

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  • Gryffon15
    started a topic Horrors of Darkness

    Horrors of Darkness

    Thinking about things that are horror properties in our real world and what they might be like instead in the World of Darkness. Hope y'all find these interesting and invite folks to add their own ideas.

    •'The Blair Witch Project' is a genuine piece of found footage which seems to illustrate the descent into madness and disappearance of three young film students in Brackittsville, Maryland. The footage did prompt searches in nearby communities but nothing came of it. The film has reached underground cult status and while all attempts to create major motion pictures based of it have either been buried or heavily edited, many are fascinated by the tale of the Blair Witch of the Black Woods...

    •'Halloween' is perhaps one of the most aggreguous exploitation films ever made. Or at least it was in the late 70s... Hollywood in the Workd of Darkness has outdone itself recently. In this world, Michael Myers is a real man, a native of Haddonfield, Illinois. In 1963 the six-year old M. Myers murdered his older sister before being institutionalized. 15 years later he escaped and killed 4 people in Haddonsfield before vanishing. He is believed to still be at large, Laurie Strode remained traumatized for life by her experiences, and was outraged to find her story exaggerated and titulated and then the studio created their own fanfiction imaging Michael's future escapades while he remained at large. Her attempted suit was thrown out of court.

    •Camp Crystal Lake, New Jersey is the site of a common urban legend where people seem to have been dying for decades since either the mid 1950s or even earlier according to legend. These real life cases of people dying and reports of a masked figure haunting the surrounding woodland as well as horrific humanoid figures in the lake itself.

    (Inspired by popular horror films and me trying to give these three examples distinct feelings, but I do hope y'all enjoy this. Plus, don't feel obligated to hornshos the stories into splats, I was just thinking about what these stories might be like as realities within the World of Darkness)

  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    A few odd ones.

    Alligator (1980) is at the tail end of the 1970s flood of "when animals attack" films (a trend that was bolstered by both the initial wave of environmental doomsday-ism and the wild success of Jaws), and for such a film that is also clearly a B-movie, it's actually a decent film. It's based on the "pet baby alligator flushed down the toilet" urban legend, in this case with the added bit that said alligator has been feeding on dead lab animals dumped in the sewer system by an unethical pharmaceutical company trying to develop livestock growth hormones. The end result is an alligator the size of a small bus with a massively jacked up metabolism and constant hunger that is roaming around this city's sewer system and eventually out in the open. (One of the highlights is Henry Silva as a big game hunter brought in to try to track the beast, and his scenery chewing elevates what is already a strange film into the realm of wonderfully crazy.) This is one of those things that could easily have happened in the World of Darkness, especially with a company like Magadon and other PENTEX companies (or companies run as Syndicate fronts or even one or more vampires working on ways to increase their food supply). It would probably have turned into one of those "hey remember when" stories, like when the Cuyahoga River caught fire or when the Mayor of Tallahassee was found in a hotel room doing crystal meth with two male prostitutes, brought up from time to time but not a major part of history.

    Chopping Mall (1986), aka Killbots, is as much a comedy as it is a horror film, involving a bunch of teens who work at the mall having a party after hours only to be attacked by the mall's malfunctioning robot security force. It is in some ways a throwback to films of the 50s and 60s mashed up with a slasher film. It was filmed on location at the Sherman Oaks Galleria in LA. The owner was a huge movie fan, so he let a lot of studios film there for little money, and it appears in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, Commando, Valley Girl, and other films, making it the archetypical 80s shopping mall. Anyway, it's another of those things that could have happened, what with a secret conspiracy (Iteration X) looking to advance the use of robot technology in society or something like PENTEX trying to test possible new anti-Garou weapons.

    Trick or Treat (1986) is a personal favorite of mine. It involves a social outcast heavy metal fan (who is really a great inspiration for a non-Goth Hollow One of the period) who gets a hold of the only pressing of the final album of his late heavy metal idol. However, it turns out that said rock star was involved in Satanism and his soul is tied to the record, and when the protagonist plays the album backwards (this was a thing in the 80s) it unleashes his malevolent ghost. It's a weird but fun bit of 80s craziness. And again, it's the sort of thing that could easily happen in the World of Darkness, where Infernalism and demonic pacts are a real thing and restless ghosts - evil and otherwise - tied to material objects are fairly common.

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  • Gryffon15
    replied
    That does sound like really good World of Darkness fodder yeah, I'll put that down and I'll try to look into that one.

    Serial killer movies in general are always one of the things that I imagine as useful for imagining a significant portion of the WoD.

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    So, The Stepfather is a rather low-key 1987 film starring Terry O'Quinn (of Lost fame) as a serial family annihilator who marries widowed mothers in an effort to create an ideal nuclear family only to have it continuously go wrong as his own mental issues derail things. One of the things that makes it so interesting (in addition to O'Quinn's great performance) is that the main character - who has changed identities so often that he know longer seems to know who he really is - is presented as almost normal on the surface (in contrast to the way most serial killers in films get presented as obvious psychopaths) who could almost be sympathetic. I find that the title character makes a rather interesting inspiration for certain vampires, wraiths, or even changelings, and something like this has more likely than not really happened in the World of Darkness.

    (The sequels are skippable, though I give the second film credit for at least trying some things different than the usual slasher film sequels. The 2009 remake, on the other hand, is a car wreck, and not in a good way, tending to screw up everything that the original did that made it work so well.)

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  • Gryffon15
    replied
    Honestly I feel like Chucky would work really well as the former (evil/demonic soul within a doll) that maybe inspires the dark dreams that would create 'copycat inanimae'.

    I'm thinking something along the lines of the reallife stories that surround the 'Annabelle' doll that is supposedly possessed by a demonic entity. A sort of demonic urban legend with a few movie and tv adaptions that allude to a long history of real world accounts of tragedies and paranormal activities.

    (Also I can't speak to the veracity of the real world doll equivalent, although I'm the sort that likes to cross them self just to be on the safe side, so take that as you will)

    Leave a comment:


  • Fat Larry
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuch View Post
    Since I'm a Mage player and not Werewolf player can someone tell me what book Gorehounds are in. They sound like they'd make a good watchdog for my baddie in an upcoming story.

    Like NOoC said, 1st and 2nd edition of Book of the Wyrm.

    They are also fleshed out(pun intended) in Freak Legion, which is a great book for creating Fomori.

    They are in Book of the Wyrm 20th, and there are two types given: The typical Jason Voorhees/Michael Myers slasher, and a new type which is more Patrick Bateman-style.

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  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Hmm. Chucky, evil human soul trapped in a doll body or malevolent Inanimie Mannikin?

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  • Gryffon15
    replied
    I'll have to check them out.

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    I do recommend them, as they have absolutely beautiful set design and a nicely fleshed out mythology behind the stories. 13 Ghosts especially, as the house in it is the sort of thing that screams to be used as a Mage chantry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gryffon15
    replied
    I've actually never seen those so I really can't take any stabs as what those may look like within the World of Darkness.

    •Within a respectably sized mid-western city in the United States, a series of virulent outbreaks in the late 90s caused a quarantine of one 'Raccoon City'. The official story was that a medical research center accidentally released a hybrid strain of rabies into the population and that government action was sufficient to isolate and eliminate the outbreak and reprimand the institution. However details seem oddly scant and many conspiracy theorists now consider Raccoon City to be alongside Area 51, Roswell, Fort Knox, and Point Plesant within sites of note for the American conspiracy theorist canon.

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Anyone want to take a stab at the first couple of Dark Castle films from the turn of the Millennium (House on Haunted Hill, 13 Ghosts, and Ghost Ship)?

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    Originally posted by Tuch View Post
    Since I'm a Mage player and not Werewolf player can someone tell me what book Gorehounds are in. They sound like they'd make a good watchdog for my baddie in an upcoming story.
    They're in the first and second editions of Book of the Wyrm (I don't know about the WW20 material). If you have the revised edition of Mage's Book of Madness, the rules for the Devil-Eaten in the Infernalism chapter can be used to create them and most basic Fomori.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tuch
    replied
    Since I'm a Mage player and not Werewolf player can someone tell me what book Gorehounds are in. They sound like they'd make a good watchdog for my baddie in an upcoming story.

    Leave a comment:


  • Logothétēs
    replied
    Originally posted by No One of Consequence View Post
    I grew up watching most of these films, and still remember reading the novelization of Friday the 13th part 6: Jason Lives in Junior High. (This was back when bookstores had a dedicated Horror section, most of them with wonderfully lurid cover art, something I dearly miss.) Alice Cooper's Constrictor album, which is largely the film's soundtrack, is still one of my favorite albums of that decade. (If you can find the music video for "He's Back (The Man Behind the Mask)" on YouTube, it makes an interesting double feature with Dokken's "Dream Warriors".)

    As far as John Carpenter, a lot of his early films could easily be "True Tales of the World of Darkness". Assault on Precinct 13 is one of my go-tos when explaining what I mean when I describe Werewolf as "a game of Savage Horror", and the sort of thing that could easily have really happened during the 1970s, when several of America's major urban areas were essentially war zones. The Fog is a great small town ghost story built around the very gothic idea of a community's long buried past sins coming back to haunt the current generation. And Christine is one of the better adaptions of Stephen King's earlier work. (And If you've never seen them, I also recommend Carpenter's "end of the world trilogy", three unconnected films that all end with what are effectively planetary doomsday scenarios: The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In The Mouth of Madness.)

    Prince of Darkness with its concept of 'Anti-God' gave off a solid Nephandi/Neverborn vibe. The Mouth of Madness might as well have had an Aswadim the main antagonist.

    Leave a comment:


  • No One of Consequence
    replied
    I grew up watching most of these films, and still remember reading the novelization of Friday the 13th part 6: Jason Lives in Junior High. (This was back when bookstores had a dedicated Horror section, most of them with wonderfully lurid cover art, something I dearly miss.) Alice Cooper's Constrictor album, which is largely the film's soundtrack, is still one of my favorite albums of that decade. (If you can find the music video for "He's Back (The Man Behind the Mask)" on YouTube, it makes an interesting double feature with Dokken's "Dream Warriors".)

    As far as John Carpenter, a lot of his early films could easily be "True Tales of the World of Darkness". Assault on Precinct 13 is one of my go-tos when explaining what I mean when I describe Werewolf as "a game of Savage Horror", and the sort of thing that could easily have really happened during the 1970s, when several of America's major urban areas were essentially war zones. The Fog is a great small town ghost story built around the very gothic idea of a community's long buried past sins coming back to haunt the current generation. And Christine is one of the better adaptions of Stephen King's earlier work. (And If you've never seen them, I also recommend Carpenter's "end of the world trilogy", three unconnected films that all end with what are effectively planetary doomsday scenarios: The Thing, Prince of Darkness, and In The Mouth of Madness.)

    Leave a comment:

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