Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Investor needed: guidance on how one should roll dice for financial godhood

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Investor needed: guidance on how one should roll dice for financial godhood



    So I was just wondering if anyone had a system for increasing resources through investment and finance rolls (Low risk, high risk)

    What difficulties you'd need, successes, how much you'd need to put in...

    So far:
    I'm assuming each dot of resources offers an amount of money multiplicative of the last (1,2,6,24,120,720 and so on) for simplicity's sake. We'll keep the units vague so you can easily imagine them adjust for time. If you had 3 dots of resources ($6) you'd need to quadruple your money for 4 ($24) resources.

    How would you represent doing that? Like, perhaps for an extended roll, what difficulty would you set it, how many successes would they need, each roll would represent how much time? I would assume I'm Gambling a certain amount of dots/hypothetical currency ( probably temporarily) for a certain amount of dots (temporary, that I could make more permanent through more investment) but I don't know how to make such dynamic.

    I recognise we're not playing Vampire: The Count, so simplicity is good. But I can't begin to simplify something i have such little understanding of.


    Throw me/White wolf some money with Quietus: Drug Lord, Poison King
    There's more coming soon. Pay what ya want.

  • #2
    Isn't this what the finance skill used to be all about?

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Dwight View Post
      Isn't this what the finance skill used to be all about?
      Yes, yes it is. Now how do we use it?


      Throw me/White wolf some money with Quietus: Drug Lord, Poison King
      There's more coming soon. Pay what ya want.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by MyWifeIsScary View Post
        Yes, yes it is. Now how do we use it?
        Well the main problem vampires run into is when the markets are open they are asleep so at best they can only be reactionary investors, which can be infuriating waking up to see everything tanked unless they have some serious inside information that will effect the markets the next day.

        I mostly treat it as a downtime action, each week the player rolls it and over the month the accumulated successes or failures determine how things go. If things go great they get temporary resource dots, things go bad they temporary loose permanent ones.

        Comment


        • #5
          Another interesting question is: what mechanisms are in place to keep unscrupulous vampires (i.e., vampires) from manipulating the market without authorization. Even setting aside the super obvious stuff like sabotaging product launches, or perpetrating corporate espionage to get the inside scoop on M&A activities, given the speed at which news travels (and the accessibility that every day people now have to the market,) there's about a million little ways an intrepid vampire could put their hands on the scales. This is particularly the case in the age of corporate cults of personality, such as with Elon Musk and his companies. The most seemingly innocuous stuff can cause bonkers shifts in Tesla or SpaceX's stock value--for instance, that time Musk got high with Joe Rogan on his podcast and started talking about Tesla's market value the way my friends and I used to get stoned and talk about starting a band... except, Musk's off-the-cuff remarks resulted in some pretty wild (albeit temporary) market behavior.

          Another thing is that even if the Ventrue have the very best security and controls over their own corporate systems, IP, facilities, and human instrumentalities, there's nothing to stop people from starting random rumors--and once the Tweet (or Chirp as seems to be the case if NWO: Rev. is any idication) is out there, it's out there. Short of a technomancer wielding god-level powers, I don't see how you guarantee that every instance of a screenshotted tweet/chirp can be deleted, or, even if deleted, how you keep everyone who saw it from reacting to it (i.e., by engaging in market behavior of whatever sort) or discussing it on other places on- and offline. Most recently, amidst the frenzy that was the race to buy/sell Tiktok, we saw various companies gets variable spikes to their stock value based on random rumors disseminated multiple times during every news cycle.


          Sig

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Dwight View Post

            Well the main problem vampires run into is when the markets are open they are asleep so at best they can only be reactionary investors, which can be infuriating waking up to see everything tanked unless they have some serious inside information that will effect the markets the next day.
            Well yes, but no. At least in modern times you can easily trade in other marketplaces that are open.
            This might involve some extra cost but at a certain point they become negligible.

            To answer the question somewhat. I think you could go with the saying the first million is the hardest. Meaning ones you get a little wealthy it becomes easier to accumulate money. A few milestone should be harder than others but it gives a general idea.

            There are a lot of variables that's why the the kept it vague. The multipliers used are okay, you could go quadratic if you want to make it harder (1,4,9,81,...) or some variation of it.
            Generally speaking it depends what the players want to achieve. A profitable short term investment with a quick way to liquidate the assets should be way harder and than a steady long-term investment. It also has a higher risk of losing a lot of money.
            So a good rule of thumb, they longer the investment period the easier the difficulty but you can't access that wealth in that time without a hefty fine. As always exceptions apply.

            Comment

            Working...
            X